Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2309887 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1943
Filing dateFeb 15, 1941
Priority dateFeb 15, 1941
Publication numberUS 2309887 A, US 2309887A, US-A-2309887, US2309887 A, US2309887A
InventorsDe Camp Alfred Joseph
Original AssigneeDe Camp Alfred Joseph
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Leakproof fuel tank projectile
US 2309887 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Wbb, 2, 1943.

A. J. DE CAMP PROOF FUEL TANK PROJECTILE l LEAK- Filed Feb. l5, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Flb. 2, W43..

A. J. DE CAMP PROOF FUEL TANK PROJECTILE LEK- ' 2 sheets-sheet 2 Filed Feb. l5. 1941 WITNESS Patented Feb. 2, 1943 UNITED STATES TENT FFICE 6 Claims.

The invention aims to provide a novel projectile for rendering leak-proof fuel tanks ineffective and by use of the word projectile, it is to be understood that I comprehend all calibers, even mere bullets. Further, it is to be understood that by leak-proof fuel tank, I comprehend not only leak-proof motive fuel tanks onv planes, trucks, tanks and other equipment, but also fuel shipping and storage containers.

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional View partly in elevation showing the projectile associated vwith a cartridge case.

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional View partly in elevation illustrating the manner in which, after the projectile forms an opening in a leak-proof fuel tank, a tubular member is left in said opening to prevent the sealing material of the tank from closing the same.

Figure 3 is a detail section showing a modified construction for carrying the incendiary powder.

Figure 4 is a detail section showing a modified riflng ring.

Figures 5 and 6 are view similar to Figs. 1 and 2 but illustrating a different form of construction.

Figures 7 and 8 are enlarged detailed sections of portions of Figs. 5 and 6.

Figure 9 is a detail section showing a still further construction for carrying the incendiary powder.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary sectional View showing yet another form of construction.

The preferred form of the invention not only embodies means to prevent closing of any opening formed by the projectile in a leak-proof fuel tank, but also means for igniting the fuel leaking from the tank, and a construction has been disclosed embodying both of these characteristics. The present disclosure is to be considered illustrative rather than limiting, even though the structure shown in the drawings will be rather specifically described. The construction shown in Figs. 1 and 2 will first be described.

A steel-jacketed projectile 3 is provided to be capable of piercing armor and the like, and said projectile may, therefore, form an opening O through a leak-proof fuel tank T as shown in Fig. 2. With present-day projectiles, such an opening formed through a wall of the fuel tank would be immediately sealed by the highly compressed resilient sealing material M and no leakage of fuel would occur. Due to my invention, however, when the opening O is formed, it is prevented from closing, allowing the fuel to leak out of the tank, and in the preferred construction, the leaking fuel is ignited for destructive purposes. y

A central shank l projects rearwardly from the projectile 3 and is snugly surrounded by an open-ended sleeve 5 of any desired metal.` The front end of this sleeve carries a rifling ring 5 to engage the usual riiing of a gun barrel, and the rear end of said sleeve is formed with an eX- ternal forwardly facing shoulder l. The diameter of the sleeve at this shoulder is slightly less than the diameter of the rifling ring 6 and may be slightly more than the rear largest diameter of the projectile 3. When the entire device is in flight, the elements 3, 4, 5, 6 and l travel as a one-piece structure. As soon as the projectile strikes the tank T, however, it forms an opening in said tank. At the same time, forward movement of the riflng ring 6 is arrested, with the result that the sleeve 5 slides forwardly through said ring ring to the limit permitted by the shoulder 1. When this occurs, the forward movement of the sleeve 5 is arrested with the result that the projectile 3 and its shank 4 forwardly withdraw from said sleeve, leaving the latter within the opening O and thus preventing the sealing material M from closing said opening. Leakage of fuel may now take place through the sleeve as will be obvious from Fig. 2, and as above stated, the leaking fuel is by preference ignited. This is accomplished in the present disclosure, in the manner described below.

An inner tube or lining 8 of incendiary powder or the like is provided in the sleeve 5, and appropriate percussion caps S are disposed in front of the shoulder 'l and in operative relation with said tube 8. Thus, when the parts arrive at the relative positions shown in Fig. 2, the percussion caps 9 strike the ring 6 and are fired thereby, with the result that said percussion caps ignite the incendiary tube 8, and the latter ignites the leaking fuel. If the ring ring 6 should by any chance break olf upon impact instead of functioning as above described, then the percussion caps 9 will strike the tank and will be red thereby, and the shoulder 'l will also strike said tank to arrest the forward travel of the sleeve 5.

In Fig. 3, I have illustrated a sleeve Eia surrounding the projectile shank lla and having a shoulder 'la at its rear end, corresponding to the shoulder 'l vabove described. Instead of having the incendiary powder within the sleeve 5a, I provide a hollow ring 8b around the rear end of said sleeve and place the incendiary powder 8a within this sleeve. Also instead of having per- -diary powder 8d.

shown at 3g.

cussion caps to nre the powder, I provide ports 1b through the shoulder 'In through which flame may pass when the propelling charge for the projectile is fired, thus igniting the incendiary powder 8a and causing the device to act as a tracer in addition to eventually firing the fuel should the tank be struck.

Fig. 4 illustrates a modied rifling ring 6a which is forwardly tapered to crowd into the opening formed in the tank (such as O above described), whereupon the sleeve (such as 5 or 5a) will follow through until it comes to rest within the opening.

In Figs. 5, 6, 7 and 8, the projectile body 3b is shown with a relatively soft rear portion 3c which becomes diminished in diameter during passage through a tank wall, leaving a smaller opening in which the shank c of the projectile will shed thc sleeve 5c. The rear portion of this sleeve is bent outwardly, forwardly and then inwardly to provide a combined shoulder 1C and hollow ring receiving the incendiary powder fic. Percussion caps 9C are shown for firing the powder and the `rear end of the ring l@ may have weakened porN tions I9 which will blow out and permit the flame to lire the fuel when the powder 8C is ignited, as will be clear by a comparison of Figs. 5 and fi and Figs. 7 and 8.

Fig. 9 discloses a construction very similar to that illustrated in Figs. 5, 6, 7 and 8. The rear portion ld of the sleeve 5d is first bulged outward- -ly to provide a shoulder and is then folded inwardly providing a hollow ring for the incen- Firing ports 'le have been illustrated through the rear edge of this ring to fire the incendiary powder when the propelling charge for the projectile is red.

In Fig. 10, the projectile body 3e is provided with a soft rear portion 3f corresponding to the portion 3 in Figs. 5 and 6, and the rear end of said body extends back around the sleeve Ee as The sleeve 5e surrounds the projectile shank de and the rear end of said sleeve is provided with an appropriate shoulder ig. It will be observed that no rifling ring is shown. in this view and it may be stated that this-ring may be dispensed with whenever possible. It is also to be observed that no incendiary means is shown in Fig. 10, in which connection, it may be stated that this means may be dispensed with also if desired. v

In various views, C merely denotes a cartridge case containing a propelling charge P for the projectile, and said cartridge case may be associated with other elements in the ways shown or in other appropriate ways. Then too, it must be remembered that with larger calibers, no cartridge case wiil of course be provided for the projectile.

In addition to rendering ineffective tanks such as self-sealing fuel tanks, the incendiary jacket of the invention will burn steel or other metal if the following conditions exist: That the jacket lodge in the side or wing of an airplane where the air strikes with extreme force and the incendiary powder be of suilicient quantity to heat the shoulder 1 to a point at which the metal of this shoulder will start burning. Then, the oxygen 4furnished under pressure by the speed of the airplane will cause the metal burning heat to continue and if the metal around the lodged incendiaiy jacket be a mild steel or some other metal that will burn, the burning heat is apt to do considerable damage before becoming impotent from lack of oxygen or air pressure.

asoassv From the foregoing taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, it will be seen that novel and advantageous provision has been made for carrying out the objects of the invention. Attention is again invited to the fact that the present disclosure is illustrative rather than limiting, and moreover, to the fact that the invention is not restricted to any particular caliber, nor to leak-proof tanks on any particular kind of equipment, nor to materials.

I claim:

l. A device of the class described comprising a projectile body to form an opening through a tank wall, a central shank rigidly secured to the rear end of said body and projecting rearwardly therefrom, a sleeve open at both ends and surrounding said shank, said sleeve having a normally tight separable connection with said shank to permit said shank to forwardly withdraw from said sleeve when the travel of the latter is arrested, the diameter of said sleeve from its iront extremity substantially to its rear end being less than the diameter of said body to permit said sleeve to enter the opening which said body forms in the target, and external stop means on said sleeve for arresting said travel of said sleeve when this sleeve has entered the opening.

2. A device of the class described comprising a projectile body to form an opening through a target, a central shank rigidly secured to the rear end of said body and projecting rearwardly therefrom, and a sleeve open at both of its ends and surrounding said shank, said sleeve having a normally tight separable connection with said shank to permit said shank to forwardly withdraw from said sleeve when the travel of the latter is arrested, the rear end of said sleeve having an external forwardly facing shoulder xedly secured thereto, and a riding ring slidably surrounding the front portion of said sleeve, said riing ring having a tight frictional connection with said sleeve to permit said sleeve to slide forwardly through said riiiing ring to the limit allowed by said xedly secured shoulder vwhen said rifling ring strikes the target.

3. A device of the class described comprising a projectile body to form an opening through a tank wall, a central shank rigidly secured to the rear end of said body and projecting rearwardly therefrom, a sleeve open at both ends and surrounding said shank, said sleeve having a normally tight separable connection with said shank to permit said shank to forwardly withdraw from said sleeve when the travel of the latter is arrested, the diameter of said sleeve from its front extremity substantially to its rear end being less than the diameter of said body to permit said sleeve to enter the opening which said body forms in the target, and external stop means on said sleeve for arresting said travel of said sleeve when this sleeve has entered the opening, said external stop means including a hollow enlargement on the rear end of said sleeve, incendiary powder within said hollow enlargement, and means for igniting said incendiary powder.

4. A device of the class described comprising a projectile body to form an opening through a tank wall, a central shank rigidly secured to the rear end of said body and projecting rearwardly therefrom, a sleeve open at both ends and surrounding said shank, said sleeve having a normally tight separable connection with said shank to permit said shankto forwardly withdraw from said sleeve when the travel of the latter 'is arrested, the diameter of said sleeve from its front extremity substantially to its rear end being less than the diameter of said body to permit said sleeve to enter the opening which said body forms in the target, and external stop means on said sleeve for arresting said travel of said sleeve when this sleeve has entered the opening, said external stop means including a hollow enlargement on the rear end of said sleeve, incendiary powder within said hollow enlargement, and percussion means on said sleeve adjacent the front edge of said enlargement for ring said incendiary powder, the rear edge of said enlargement having means for permitting name from the burning powder to escape.

5. A structure as specified in claim 2 together with incendiary means `carried by said sleeve to ignite the leaking fuel, and a percussion cap carried by said sleeve to ignite said incendiary means, said cap being disposed in front of said shoulder to strike said rifling ring when the sleeve slides forwardly through said ring.

6. A structure as specified in claim 2 together with an incendiary tube within said sleeve to ignite the leaking fuel, and a percussion cap carn ried by said sleeve to ignite said incendiary tube, said clap being disposed in front of said shoulder to strike said rifling ring when the sleeve slides forwardly through said ring.

ALFRED JOSEPH DE CAMP.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2811204 *Oct 1, 1953Oct 29, 1957Kritzer Richard WApparatus for making heat transfer coils
US3021746 *Mar 7, 1956Feb 20, 1962Olin MathiesonFastening device
US3990343 *Aug 7, 1975Nov 9, 1976Uniroyal Inc.Rivets for securing end connectors to conveyor belts
US6843179 *Sep 20, 2002Jan 18, 2005Lockheed Martin CorporationPenetrator and method for using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/517, 102/364
International ClassificationF42B30/00, F42B30/08
Cooperative ClassificationF42B30/08
European ClassificationF42B30/08