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Publication numberUS2310072 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1943
Filing dateMar 27, 1940
Priority dateMar 27, 1940
Publication numberUS 2310072 A, US 2310072A, US-A-2310072, US2310072 A, US2310072A
InventorsFry Benjamin W
Original AssigneeNat Vendors Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vending machine
US 2310072 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 2, 1943. B. w. FRY 2,310,072

VENDING MACHINE Feb. 2, 1943. B. w. 'FRY 2,310,072

VENDING MACHINE Filed March 27. 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Feb. 2, 1943. B. w. FRY

VENDING MACHINE Filed March 27, 1940'y 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Feb. 2, 1943. EL W@ FRY 2,310,072

VENDNG MACHINE Filed March 27, 1940 5 sheets-sheet 5 Patented Feb. 2, 1943 UNTED PTENT GFFICE.

to National Vendors, Inc., St.

poration of Missouri Louis, Mo., a cor- Appication March 27, 1940, Serial No. 326,123

(Cl. S12-63) 14 Claims.

rihis invention relates to vending machines, and with regard to certain more specic feainiresto improvements upon the construction shown in my United States patent application Serial No. 295,005, filed September 15, 1939, for Vending machine.

Among the several objects of the invention may be noted the provision of a vending machine which provides for selectivity of operation from various magazines loaded with articles such as books or the like, including simplified interlock means for preventing more than one operation at a time; the provision of apparatus of the class described which is simpler and more compact than formel` apparatus, including that of said former application, compactness being attained in part by an ejection by article reciprocation instead of one-way article movement; the provision of apparatus of the class described in which a purchaser may obtain the return of a coin after an unsuccessful attempt to obtain an item from an empty magazine or upon a change of mind under certain circumstances; the provision of apparatus of this class in which the iull or empty condition of a magazine is made evident in a simple manner; and the provision of such apparatus which is provided with means for preventing damage in case of an attempted enforced operation under improper conditions, such as, for example, when an improper coin has been admitted to the machine. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the elements and combinations of elements, features of construction, and arrangements of partswhich will be exemplified in the structures hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which is illustrated one of various possible embodiments of the invention,

Fig. l is a front elevation, reduced in scale;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged front elevation of the upper parts of Fig. 1, the front of the casing being removed;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of Fig.A 1 with the casing removed;

Fig. 4 is a vertical section taken on line 4-.4

of Fig. l. certain upper parts being broken away for clarity; p

Fig. ais a fragmentary view similar to thc lower portion of Fig. 4, showing an alternative Vposition of certain coin-released parts;

Fig. 6 is a vertical section taken on line 6-6 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged, detailed front elevation of a single magazine and dispensing means in cooperating position;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged horizontal section taken on line 8 8 of Fig. 4 but showing a coin inserted;

Fig. 9 is a vertical section taken on line 9--9 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 1U is a view similar to Fig. 9 (somewhat extended) showing the start of a forward part of a delivery operation;

Fig. l1 is a view similar to Fig. l0 showing the beginning of the rearward part of the delivery operation;

Fig. l2 is a View similar to Fig. 11 showing an attempted (but blocked) delivery 'operation from an empty magazine;

Fig. 13 is a vertical section taken on line I3-I3 of Fig. 10; and,

Fig. 14 is a substantially horizontal section taken on line I4-I4 of Fig. 10.

Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1, there is shown at numeral I an enclosing casing, in the iront 3 of which are tiers A, B and C of display panels 5, indicating what is carried in magazines 3| behind the respective panels. The term magazine herein means a supply compartment for articles to be vended, such as booklets. For example, the panels 5 may be opaque with suitable display characters (as shown), or, if desired, transparent, so that the articles in the magazines 3| may be seen. In the present example, booklets are the articles being vended, but the invention is applicable to the dispensing of other articles.

Below each tier of four panels 5 and in the casing I is a horizontal transit slot 'I from which branch four, downwardly directed selector slots 9. One transit `slot I and four, branched selector slots 9 are beneath each tier of panels 5. Between the respective slots 'I and the panels 5 and over the respectiveselector slots 9 Yare openings II behind which operate full-empty indicators I3, best shown in Figs. 'l and 9-12.

At the lower end of the casing I is an article delivery outlet .I 5. On the right-hand side is an upwardly-located coin-receiving slot II. At I9 is a slot for a coin-return lever 2| which, when operated in 'the manner to be described, returns a coin through a passage 23 into the outlet I5 at 25.

Inside of the casing I are vertical side supports 21 which are rigidly spaced by means of three rigid shelves 29. Each shelf 29 is located beneath the front of a tier of four magazines 3| (Figs. 2-4 and 9-12).

Each magazine 3| consists of a pair of front corner angle pieces 33 which are held in a sloping position on a cross bar 35, the latter being supported rigidly upon the side plates 21. The rear of each magazine consists of back plates 31 turned up to form corners 39, the respective back plates 31 being fastened upon supports 4|. The supports il are also rigidly carried between the side plates 21. Thus, the side plates 21 are rigidly spaced by, and with the shelves 29 and cross members 35 and 4| form, a rigid structural skeleton in which the tiers of magazines 3| are rigidly supported, The operating parts to be described are movably supported upon this skeleton.

Incidentally, the supports 4| behind the two lowermost tiers of magazines 3| support at their sides deflectors 43 for guiding rearwardly ejected booklets between the back 45 of casing and the deectors 43, so that said booklets are properly sent down to a lowermost guide chute 41 which directs them out to the openings l5, This refers to the booklets from the uppermost tiers, indicated at A and B. Booklets from the lower tier C do not pass behind any deflectors such as 43, but in front of a defiector 159 to the same outlet I5, as will be shown. In short the deiiectors 43 cause the booklets to by-pass otherwise obstructing mechanisms, while no such mechanisms are beneath tier C.

Beneath each shelf 29 is a square (polygonal) shaft 5| which has lateral bearings 53 in the side plates 21 (see for example Fig. 7). The shafts 5| are rotary in their bearings. Inasmuch as all of them, and the mechanisms associated with them are the same, only one has been detailed (see Figs. 2, 4, '7 and 9-12).

On each square shaft 5| is a laterally sliding transit carriage 55 to which is pivoted (at 51) a subcarriage 1| having an operating handle 59. Handle 59 has a finger plate 6| bent forwardly and extending through the transit slot 1. Lateral ears 12 serve to pivot 1| at 51 and springs E3 servenormally to hold the arm 59 against the carriage 55.

By grasping the finger plate 6|, the carriage 55 may be slidingly moved laterally in transit between various positions under the respective magazines 3|. Whenever, but only when, it is over a selector slot 9, the finger plate 6| may be depressed in a plane perpendicular to the sliding movement, with arm 59 then entering a slot 9. In this event, the springs 63 transmit rotary movement from the handle 59 to the carriage 55, as indicated for example by comparing Figs. 9, 10 and 11. However, the springs E3 allow for relative movement between the handle 59 and the carriage 55, should substantial resistance be set up to the rotary motion of the carriage (see dotted lines in Fig. 12). An adjustable set screw E5 provides means for obtaining the proper and desired relative positions between the handle 59 and the carriage 55 Whenever the carriage 55 rotates, the substantially square shaft upon which it is mounted also rotates. 'Ihe sliding connection between the carriage 55 and the shaft 5| is provided with a quadrilateral (lozenge shaped) opening 61, the shape of which is slightly different from that of the shaft, so that upper and lower point bearings may be obtained at 69, thus assuring easy sliding transit without binding and also rotary movements without too much play.

As indicated in Fig. 'i, each carriage 55 has a bottom 'i3 with up-turned arms 'i 5 at the ends. It is through the arms 15 that the lozenge openings 81 are made and through which the shaft 5| passes.

At each end of each square shaft 5| is supported a sector-shaped ratchet 11 which cooperates with a corresponding spring-centered pawl 19 (pvoted on the respective side plate 21) to insure that when rotation of the respective shaft 5| has been substantially started in either direction it will be carried to completion before a return action is effected. The pawls 19 are normally held to the Central position by means of springs 8|. Further description of ratchets and pawls are unnecessary, inasmuch as they are known in the prior art. rIhey are best shown in Figs. 4 and 5.

Each sector 11 on the left side of the machine (Fig. 6) is provided with a roller 83 which extends out through a slot 85 in the corresponding .side plates 21 and into the plane of two interlocking bars 81. The bars 81 also have slots 9| accommodating the ends 53 of the upper square shafts 5|, said ends 53 of the shafts forming limiting stops against both downward and upward motions of the bars. The ends of the bars are so related to the slots that the swinging of only one roller 83 is accommodated at one time. That is, if one roller is in any of its forwardly drawn positions (to the right in Fig. 6), then neither of the others can move forward. For example if in Fig. 6 the upper roller 83 is moved forward, then the lower rollers 83 are blocked against motion by the lower ends of both bars 81. On the other hand, if the central roller is pulled forward, it will move in between the adjacent ends of the bars 81 and will block the motion of the upper and lower rollers. If the lower roller is moved, both bars will be pushed up to block the motion of the upper and middle rollers. Thus an interlock is obtained between tiers, so that only one of the shafts 5| can be rotated by means of its respective carriage 55. Chamfers 8|! facilitate the action.

In addition to the exclusive selective rotary operation as between the three carriages of the respective tiers A, B and C (made possible by the described Vertical interlock 83, 81), each carriage may be moved along its respective shaft 5| to dispense selectively from one, but only one, or another of the four magazines in the tier.

Completion of the description of the construction and operation of each carriage and magazine will now be given (Figs. 4, 7 and 9-13). The back 31 of each magazine has a supporting ledge 93 in which are notches 95 providing for the entry from the rear of pusher members 91 when the latter have been moved in transit into proper registry lposition with respect to the notches (Fig. 13). The pusher members 91 are carried by a frame 99 which has two forwardly extending arms |0| spaced farther apart than the interior width of one magazine 3|. These arms |0| extend to a pivot pin |03 which is carried in the upstanding arms 15 of the carriage 55 (Fig. 7). Spacing pillars |96 are used to maintain proper lateral spacing between the arms |0| of the frame 99 and the arms 15 of the carriage 55. 'Ihe reason for the increased width of the space between arms |0| is so that they will provide an open space at least as wide portion of the pivot pin |03 a rotary ejector pawl as the magazine to permit articles (booklets for example) to drop from the bottom of the magazine and' through the frame 99 as will appear'.`

The rear end of each frame 99 carries openings |25 for both pivotal movement and sliding transit movement upon a bar |21. The bar |21 reaches between the supporting plates 21 and extends through bearing openings |29 (see also Fig. 6) for forward and backward movement. Suitable loose exterior washers |3| held by cotter pins |33 serve to guide the rod |21 in successively parallel positions when the frame 99 moves forward. At the same time, the frame 99 may assume any lateral transit position with respect to the rod |21 to accommodate itself to transit positions of the frame 55 on shaft 5|.

The front of each magazine has its bottom formed by extensions |02 from the respective shelf 29, these extensions providing notches (Fig. 3). Thus, as shown in Fig. 10, the extensions |02 (at the front) and the extensions 93 (at the back) support the front and back ends of the articles (booklets) |01 which are being vended. The articles or booklets are of rectangular form.

At numeral 4 is indicated a follower weight which rests upon the topmost of each stack of booklets |01. This weight has a handle 6 struck up from its upper surface and recesses 8 which register with the recesses |05 in the shaft 29. These recesses 8 are necessary so that the follower weight does not function as a booklet to become itself ejected after exhaustion of a magaZlnB.

At the front support |02 there is an outlet |09 in each magazine beside which is fastened an adjustable lip with downwardly extending prongs H3 passing into openings of those extensions |92 which are central with respect to the magazines 3|. The open portion ||5 under each lip serves to accommodate limited motion of the forward end of a lower booklet |91 (Fig. 1l), but the downward extension ||3 also acts as a limiting stop to further forward movement. The downward extensions ||3 also function as loose pivots through openings ||1 in the indicators |3 (Fig. 14). The indicators have a bottom ridge portion ||9 which pivots at the region of the openings ||1. Each indicator |3 also has faces I2| and |23, the former indicating full and the latter indicating empty when before its respective opening l. The full face |2| is moved into position when the rear portion |20 of the bent plate ||9 is depressed, as when the respective magazine is loaded, as in dicated in Figs. 9-11.

The extension |20 of the indicator |3 lies between the forward end |51 of the lowermost of articles |01 and the central extension |02 and permits riding forward of the article as desired. The thickness of the extension |20 slightly arches the forward edge of the booklet, but this is provided for in the vertical adjustment of the stop l. This adjustment also accommodates various thicknesses of booklets which are being dispensed. When the respective magazine is unloaded, as indicated in Fig. 12, gravity causes the front portion of the indicator |3 to drop to present the empty face |23 opposite the opening At this time the weight 4 is down but its tongue |22 (between openings 3) does not contact the extension |20 because of notch |24 in extension |20. Thus the indicator is not set by the weight to indicate full at this time.

Each carriage 55 supports upon the central |35 which has ears or flaps |31 adapted by suitable positioning of the carriage 55 to become aligned with the front openings |05. This is indicated in Fig. 3. The pawl |35 is supported upon the pivot pin |03 by means of ears |39, and is normally spring pressed upward in a counterclockwise position (as viewed in Figs. 9-12) by means of a spring |4|. A limiting stop |43 on the carriage 55 (contacted by an extension |44) serves to hold the pawl |35 in clearing position for transit with respect to the under side of Vthe stack of booklets |01 in the magazine when the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 9, that is, with the finger piece 6| up. This permits free lateral movement of the carriage 55 on the square shaft 5|, as well as of the attached frame 99 which is moved in transit on the rod |21.

The ejector pawl plate |35 includes a lower nger |45 which cooperates with a finger |41 of a dog |49 which is rotary on a pin |5| in the carriage 55. The upward position of the dog |49 is determined by a stop |52 (Fig. 9) when the spring |4| pushes the ejector pawl |35 counterclockwise. When the ejector pawl |35 is rotated clockwise (by means to be made clear), the finger |45 lifts away from finger |41, permitting gravity to rotate the dog |49 from the position shown in Fig. 9 to the position shown in Fig. l0. When the dog |49 is up, as shown'in Fig. 9, it interferes with a lip |53 upon any attempt to substantially rotate the carriage 55 (see Fig. l2). Otherwise, the dog |49 clears the lip |53 and permits rotation (see Fig. 10).

Operation of the ejector mechanism per se is as follows, referring to a single tier, such as A:

Assuming that the coin release mechanism to be described has been supplied with a suitable coin, the respective finger piece 6| is moved laterally in the transit slots 1 to a position under the magazine having the desired booklet. Piece 6| is then depressed so that its handle 59 passes into the corresponding selector groove 9. Before depression, the position of parts is as shown in Fig. 9. The ejector pawl |35 lies with its lug |44 against the stop |43' on carriage 55. In coming to this position the pawl endsk |31 laterally clear the bottommost of the booklets |01 as well as the inner ends of the extensions |02.

As the finger piece 6| is depressed (after transit to a slot 9), the carriage 55 receives rotary motion through the spring 63 and rotates the shaft 5|, as indicated in Fig. 10. This causes the rear pushers 91 to enter the openings 95 and contact the rear edge |55 of the lowermost booklet |01. At the same time, the rotation of the carriage 55 carries the ejector lug |35 upwardly, so that its tabs |31 are depressed by the lowermost booklet as the lug rotates clockwise relative to the carriage 55 (the latter moving counterclockwise). This action is also shown in Fig. 19. Since the lug |35 rotates clockwise, its finger |45 relieves the finger |41of the dog |49 so that the latter clears the lip or stop |53, and consequently the carriage 55 may be rotated further; VIn other words, further substantial action is not blocked.

It may here be stated that, if further action is blocked, the carriage 55 returns to its initial posi- -tion such as shown in Fig. 9, as does also the bed 99 without ejecting a booklet. The spring for this return action is connected with the coin control linkage, and will be described hereinafter. f

Assuming further movement-from the'position shown in Fig. 10, the front edge |51 of the lowermost booklet is pushed out of the opening ||5 and against the stop ||3 as indicated in Fig. 11. The flaps |31 slip off the end of the booklet and swing through openings |95. During thisimovement, cams |59 on the side bars ||J| of the frame 99 contact an edge 6| of a rotary supporting plate |63 which reaches entirely across the Inachine under the respective tier. This causes the plate |63 to lift into supporting position for the rear portion of the booklet as the rear edge |55 of the booklet drops from the supports 93 (Fig. 1l). Thus the nal action, as indicated in Fig. 1l, is for the ejector pawl |35 to rotate further clockwise (relative to the carriage 55), so as to spring from under the front end |51 of the booklet as shown in Fig. 11. The dog M9 at this time is resiliently held against its stop |52 and upon subsequentl upward movement can spring past ledge |53.

Finally, the customer, having reached the end of the down-stroke of the finger plate 6|, releases it, whereupon the shaft 5| returns clockwise (by spring means to be described) to return the carriage 55 clockwise. This causes the fingers |31 of the ejector pawl |35 to contact the front edge |51 of the lowermost booklet |61 to push it backward, as indicated by comparing Figs. l1 and 9 successively. During this action, the lower end of the dog |49 drags over the lip |53 and snaps into position above it, the spring permitting this action. The booklet as it is pushed backward is pushed over the edge of the plate |63 and is thus directed between the deflector plates 43 and the back 45 to slide out over the curved deilector 41 and out of the opening |5. As the frame 99 returns to the rear, the next highest but bottommost booklet drops into position for a repetition of the action. Each time that the frame 99 moves forward, the supporting shaft |21 moves into returned position in the slots |29.

After a magazine has been exhausted, as indicated in Fig. 12, not only does the indicator plate |9 move into a position to show empty, because of the absence of weight on extension |20, but it is impossible to make another full stroke ejecting action, because under such conditions there is no bottommost booklet to turn the ejector lug |35 clockwise relative to the incipient counterclockwise action of the carriage 55. This means that the dog |99 will never drop clear from the ledge |59. 'Ihis prevents further substantial motion of the carriage 55. This prevents the mechanism from proceeding to a position wherein the pawls 19 catch in the ratchets 11 and prevent a coin (which the custornei' has heretofore deposited) from being discharged into the money box of the apparatus, as will be shown. Thus the coin is left in a position wherein operation of the coin-return lever 2| may retrieve it.

It is important to state here the fact that when the counterclockwise action of the carriage 55 is blocked, as above made clear, the customer may inadvertently apply extra force to the nger plate 6| in an attempt t0 obtain a delivery of an article. This will not have the effect of abusing the mechanism, because it will simply cause deection of the spring V63 to an extent wherein angling occurs between the lever 59 and the'carriage 55, as indicated in Fig. l2.

Although the above operation is described in connection with the top level of the machine at tier A, a similar operation occurs on` each of .new in the present device. .4, 5 and 8. For supporting the pin, a horizontal the levels B and C, by means of the respective carriages vin 'connection therewith. However, in the case of the lowermost level, a supporting bar such as |63 is not used. As the rear edge of the bottommost booklet |01 moves forward and then drops down itis supported upon the edge portion |65 of the defle'ctor plate 49, and then upon the rearward ejection stroke, the front edge falls down and the booklet slides directly out of the opening l5. The purpose of the automatic supporting devices |63 in connection with the upper tiers is to cause the booklet to move to the back of the cabinet in falling so that it does not become entangled in the apparatus in the lower tiers.

The coin controlled mechanism will now be described. This is located on the right-hand side of the machine (Figs. 4 and 5) and comprises a drag link |61 which is normally held in an upward returned position by a spring |68 (Fig. 4). Pivoted to the drag link |61, for use at each of tiers A, B and C are bell-cranks |59. The bellcrank in connection with the upper tier A is not shown in Fig. 4 because of the fact that parts are broken away, but it is the same as the one shown in connection with tier B. Each bellcrank |69 is pivoted at |1| to the right-hand side plate 21, and has a downwardly extending arm |13 with which cooperates a roller |15. Each roller reaches through a slot in the righthand side plate 21. The rollers |15 reach from the right-hand set of ratchets 11 on square shafts 5|. Thus it will be seen that any time that one of the square shafts 5| is rotated by means of its lever 59 it rotates its respective bell-crank |69 and all of the other bell-cranks |69 are likewise rotated by reason of the drag link connection |61. This however does not involve rotation of the other square shafts 5|, because, although the rollers |15 push the levers |13, the reverse action does not necessarily occur.

The purpose of the drag link connection is to insure operation of the lowermost bell-crank |99 when any other one is operated by action of its respective square shaft 5|. The lowermost bell-crank |69 carries a sector extension |11 (shown also in Fig. 8) behind which is received (from a coin passage |19) the controlling coin |99. This type of coin release mechanism is generallyknown and comprises a spur |8| which, if a coin is not in position, upon incipient motion of the sector member |11 comes into contact with a pawl |83 which is normally pulled into a downward position by a spring |95. Thus without a coin, any action of the device is blocked by cooperation between the spur |8| and the pawls |85.

On the other hand, when a coin |99 is in position, as shown in Fig. 5, it acts as a cam over the spur |3| .to lift the pawl |83 so that the pawl clears the spur ISI. This permits full stroke actionof the device and movement of the coin |99 from'a seat ISI and into the channel |81 (Fig. 5) and coin box |89.

Prior to dropping of the coin into the chute |81 it is supported upon said support |9| and is pushed into the chute |31 by the action of a backing pin |93. The addition of this pin or its equivalent, and the provision for its release, is It is shown in Figs.

platform is attached to the sector extension |11. Ears |91 thereon slidably support the pin |93 for lateral movement into position behind the coin |99. A spring 29| normally pushes a lug '293 of the pin |'93'to force the pin into the position shown in Fig.v 8, which is the position behind the coin |99, for moving the coin over into the slot |81 when the sector |11 operates.

To pull the pin |93 out from the coin |99 a bell-crank 205is provided on a pin 201 which in turn is supported upon the horizontal plate |95. One arm of the bell-crank 205 operates behind the lug 203 to withdraw the pin and the other arm is contacted by the depending arm 209 of another bell-crank 2II in a 90 plane. The other arm 2| of the bell-crank 2| I extends out through the slot I9 (Figs. 1, 4 and 5) and has already been mentioned as being the coin return arm.

Whenever a customer desires return of a coin, either before an attempted operation, or after an attempted or unconsummated operation, he simply presses upon the coin return lever 2|, whereupon the bell-crank 2I| rotates counterclockwise thus rotating the bell-crank 205 counterclockwise (Fig. 8) and withdrawing the pin |93 from behind the coin |99. Since the support I9I for the coin slopes slightly to the left, the coin will then roll out over the guide 213 and into a return chute 2|5, at the bottom of which is an outlet 2|1 into the opening I5.

The overall operation from the customers viewpoint will now be described. I-le drops the requisite coin (for example a dime) into the slot I1. The slot I1 passes through a coin selector mechanism 2I8 as indicated in Figs. 4 and 5. If the coin is bad, it sticks at shelf 2|6 and can be cleared only by depressing shelf 2IS to fall through passage 2I9 to be returned at 25. This coin selector mechanism 2|8 per se forms no part of the present invention and other forms may be used if desired. Further description is notnecessary except to state that downward release at 2|6 is effected by a connection 220 with lever 2|, as indicated at 222. The selector mechanism has not been described in detail,

because it is an attachment of one character or another for separating good and bad coins and 4per se forms no part of the present invention.

cated in Figs. 5 and 8. It is held from gravitating to the left by pin |93. This makes the machine potentially operable from any one of the finger plates I in any one of the tiers A, B

or C.

One ofthe nger plates 6I is then moved along its transit groove 1 to the desired panel 5 and depressed into the desired selector groove 9. If the corresponding magazine is full, the bottommost booklet is ejected by means of the forward and backward strokes of frame 99, upon depressing and releasing the respective finger plates, as above described. The depressing action will rotate the corresponding carriage 55 and shaft and also the respective endwise bellcrank |69 Fig. 4). This, through the drag link |61, operates the lowermost bell-crank |69 with its coin control extension |11. All action can hence proceed when the coin is in position, and

Aconsequently a booklet is delivered and the coin is delivered to the coin box |89 through the passage |81.

At any time before pressing down the desired ,nger plate 6|, the customer may change his mind as to the panel from which he wishes to withdraw a booklet. It is expected that he will normally try to withdraw booklets from full panels, but if he inadvertently should place the selector 6I under an empty panel and press it down, rotary action by the carriage 55 would be blocked as indicated in Fig. 12 and above described, before the mechanism would be driven into a position such as to send the coin through chutes |69 and |81 to the coin box |89. Although the customer may then violently push down the nger plate 6|, no damage can be done to the mechanism in its position under the respective empty magazine (see springs |53; Fig. 12)

From this point on, the customer may either decide to take a booklet from another full magazine, in which event he simply shifts the position of the carriage by putting the nger pl-ateII under another magazine; or he may decide that he does not want a booklet at all, in which event he simply depresses the coin return lever 2| and obtains a return of the coin from the chute 2|5 at point 25.

On the other hand, once the customer substantially depresses the finger plate 6I beneath a full magazine he cannot do anything but complete the action. No return action is possible without a delivery of a magazine because of the full stroke ratchets 11 and the cooperating pawls 19. This is `to prevent tampering in order to obtain a booklet and the return of its cost at the same time.

.given tier.

The short and partial forward delivery `stroke and the short, doubling, rearward, ejecting stroke for causing movement of a booklet from its magazine to delivery position results in the machine being quite shallow, considering the length of article being dispensed. Along with this is the ease with which provision may be made for interlocking against operation when a magazine is empty.

Another advantage is that, in the case where a magazine is empty or in the case where a customer changes his mind before operationjis in itiated under any magazine, the customer may obtain the return of the purchase price before delivery of a booklet. That is to say, carriage operation is blocked and no motion is delivered to the coin operated mechanism when no booklets are present in a magazine, and this feature vis so arranged (in connection with provision for return of the coin upon mere decision of the customer) that many parts are saved.

Another advantage is the simple full-empty signal means.

Another advantage is in the safety spring mechanism between the operating finger pieces and the carriages to prevent breakage when rotary motion of the carriage is blocked, as when a magazine is empty and a customer uses undue force.

It is clear that as many magazines may be used in a tier as desired,and also any desirable number of tiers may be used. Various articles may be accommodated at variousprices without change in principle.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As many changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the'invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as-illustrative and. not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

l. A vending machinecomprising a magazine, said magazine having anopen bottom with-front and rear article supporting shelves and having an outlet at the front shelf permitting limited forward movement of an article so as to release its rear portion from the-rear supporting shelf, a L.

reciprocating frame movable forwardto push a lowermost article fromv said rear shelf, whereby it is held on the front shelf, and pawl means at the front portion of the frame responsive upon contact with the .front portion of the lowermost article tomove into position for ejecting the article from the front shelf upon return movement.

2. A vendingmachine comprising a magazine, said magazine having an open bottom withv front and rear article supporting shelves and having an outlet at the front shelfpermitting limited forward movement of'an article so as to release its rear portion from' the rear supporting shelf, a reciprocating frame movable forward to push a lowermost article from said rear shelf, whereby it is held on the front shelf, and pawl means at lthevfront portion of the frame to eject the article from the front shelf upon return movement.

3. A vending machine comprising a magazine, said magazine having an open bottom with front and rear article supporting shelves and having an outlet at the front shelf permitting, limited forward movement of an article so asto release itsv rear portion from the rear supporting shelf, I

areciprocat-ing frame movable forward to push a lowermost article from said rear shelf, whereby it is held on the front shelf, pawl means at the front portion of the frame for ejecting the article-from the front shelf upon return movement of the frame, and means responsive to the vinitial movement of said pawl permitting reciprocation of the frame only when the pawl responds tocontact withan article within the magazine.

4. A vending machinecomplsing a magazine, saidmagazine having an open bottom withfront and rear articlesupporting shelves, and having an outlet .at the` front shelf permitting limited forward movement of an article so as gravitationally. to releaseits-rean portion from the rear supporting. shelf, a reciprocating frame movable forwardly to push a lowermost article from said rear shelf only, pawl means at the front portion of. the frame contacting with the front portion of the lowermost article for ejecting the article from the front shelf upon return movement of the frame, means responsive to the initial movement of said pawl permitting substantial reciprocation of the frame only when the pawlinitially responds to contact with an article within the magazine, said Aframe being adapted to permit passage of ejected articles therethrough.

5. A vending machine comprising a magazine,

Vsaid magazine having an open bottom with front and rear article supporting shelves, and having an outlet at the front shelf permitting limited forward movement of an article so as gravitationally to release its rear portion from the rear supporting shelf, a reciprocating frame movable forwardly to push a lowermost article from said rear shelf only, pawl means at the iront portion of the frame contacting with the front portion of the lowermost article for ejecting the article from the front shelf upon return movement of the frame, means responsive to the initial movement of said p-awl permitting substantial reciprocation of the frame only when the pawl initially responds to contact with an article within the magazine, said frame being adapted to permit passage of ejected articles therethrough, a movable support transverse of the frame and a cam on the frame adapted upon forward movement to move said support into temporary supporting position for an article which is free of the` rear shelf but on the front shelf.

6. A vending machine comprising a magazine, said magazine having an `open bottom with front and rear article supporting shelves and having an outlet at the front shelf permitting limited forward movement of an article so as to release its rear por-tion from the rear supporting shelf, a` reciprocating frame movable forward to push a lowermost article from said rear shelf, whereby the article is held on the front shelf, pawl means at the front portion of the frame responsive upon initial contact withthe front portion of the lowermost article to move subsequently into position for ejecting the article from the front shelf upon return movement of the frame, a stop, a dog organized for movement with said frame and engaged by the pawl and additionally movable by the pawlwhen the pawl contacts said lowermost article, whereby the dog clears the stop, said dog engaging said stop to lock against completemovement of the frame whensaid pawl fails to move in the absence of any article in the magazine.

7. A vending machine comprising a magazine, said magazine having an open bottom with front and rear article supporting shelves and having an outlet at the front shelf permitting limited forward movement of an article so as to release its rear portion from the rear supporting shelf, a reciprocating frame movable forward to push a lowermost article from said rear shelf, whereby the article is held on the front shelf, pawl means at the front portion for ejecting the article from the front. shelf upon return movement of the frame, and means responsive to the initial movement of said pawl permitting substantial reciprocation of the frame only when the pawl responds to contact with an article within. the magazine, whereby substantial operation is prevented' under empty condition of the magazine, and a follower for the column of articles having clearing space to prevent cooperation with the said pawl, so that the follower does not function as `an article to be finally ejected.

8. A vending machine comprising a magazine for a column of articles to be dispensed, said magazine having a forward opening permitting limited forward movement of said articles, said magazine being open at the bottom and having forward and rearward supporting shelves for the column of articles, supporting means for transverse movement of an ejector mechanism into position, a .rotary carriage, a frame pivoted at the front to the carriage and mounted at therear for reciprocation by the carriage, lug means on the rear of the frame for contacting a lowermost article to push it a limited distance and from the rearward shelf upon rotation of the carriage, a stop transverse of the carriage, a dog O'n the carriage normally cooperable with said stop, a movable ejecting pawl adapted upon one movement of the carriage to contact the front of an article to effect movement of the dog to positions whereby carriage movement may continue, but permitting positioning of the dog to block carriage movement when no article is in the magazine, said pawl functioning as an ejector upon reverse rotation of the carriage and return movement of said frame.

9. A vending machine comprising a magazine for a column of articles to be dispensed, said magazine having a forward opening permitting limited forward movement of said articles, said magazine being open at the bottom and having forward and rearward supporting shelves for the column of articles, supporting means for transverse movement. of an ejector mechanism into position beneath said magazine, said ejector mechanism comprising a rotary carriage, a frame pivoted at the front to the carriage and mounted at the rear for reciprocation by the carriage, lug means on the rear of the frame for contacting a lowermost article to push it a limited distance and from the rearward shelf upon rotation of the carriage, a stop `transverse of the carriage, a dog on the carriage normally cooperable with said stop, a movable ejecting pawl adapted upon one movement of the carriage to contact the front of an article to effect movement of the dog to positions whereby carriage movement may continue, but permitting positioning of the dog to block carriage movement when no article is in the magazine, said pawl functioning as an ejector upon reverse rotation of the carriage and return movement of said frame,4 whereby said lowermost article is removed from the forward shelf, said frame having an opening surrounding the lower end of the magazine to permit falling therethrough of said article after removal.

10. A vending machine comprising tiers of article-supporting magazines, a movable lateral guide means associated with each tier, an ejecting means movable along each guide means into position adjacent to any magazine in the associated tier, the ejecting means being organized with the respective guide means to move the guide means when the ejecting means are given additional ejecting movements, means determining that each ejecting means may receive an ejecting movement only when in a predetermined position adjacent rto a magazine in its respective tier, and interlocking means between the respective guide means, whereby only one guide is movable at a time and therefore only one ejecting means is operable at a time to eject from one magazine in its respective tier.

11. A vending machine comprising tiers of article-supporting magazines, a movable lateral guide means associated with each tier, an ejecting means sliding along each guide respectively into position under any magazine in the associated tier, the ejecting means being organized with the respective guide means to rotate the guide means when the ejecting means are given additional rotary ejecting movements, means determining that each ejecting means may receive an ejecting movement only when under a magazine in its respective tier, each ejecting means freely sliding on its respective guide means independently of movement of the other ejecting means, and interlocking means between the respective guide means, whereby only one guide is movable at a time and therefore only one ejecting means at a time is rotary and operable to eject from one magazine.

12. A vending machine comprising tiers of article-supporting magazines, a movable lateral guide means associated with each tier, ejecting means sliding along each guide means into position adjacent to any magazine, the ejecting means being organized with the respective guide means to move the guide means when the ejecting means are given additional ejecting movements in planes perpendicular to the sliding movements, means determining that each ejecting means may receive an ejecting movement only when predeterminately positioned with respect to a magazine in its respective tier, and interlocking means connected between the respective guide means, whereby only one guide means is movable at a time and therefore only one ejecting means is operable at a time to eject from one magazine.

13. A vending machine comprising horizontal tiers of magazines for columns of articles to be dispensed, transit means movable to selected positions beneath the said magazines including means operable in said transit means in a selected position for removing the bottommost article of a column in a respective magazine, and locking means for preventing any substantial ejecting operating movements in said transit means in a selected position when the respective magazine is empty.

14. A vending machine comprising horizontal tiers of magazines for columns of articles to be dispensed, transit means movable to selected positions beneath the said magazines including means operable in said transit means in a selected position for removing the bottommost article of a column in a respective magazine, locking means for preventing any substantial ejecting operating movements'in said transit means in a selected position when the respective magazine is empty, a manually operable member movable with the transit means for effecting opera- Y tion, and resilient means connecting the member and transit means providing for manual operation of said member without operation of the article-removing means when the latter is locked.

BENJAMIN W. FRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2681842 *Jun 24, 1950Jun 22, 1954Internat Mutoscope CorpMultiple magazine type article vending apparatus
US2819139 *Oct 18, 1954Jan 7, 1958Stevenson Irving CContainer for toilet paper rolls
US2825487 *Jan 4, 1952Mar 4, 1958Rowe Mfg Co IncSignal for columnar merchandising machine
US2916126 *Aug 3, 1953Dec 8, 1959Shipman Archie VControl for vending machines and the like
US2998901 *Oct 5, 1959Sep 5, 1961Jr Lloyd S ArnoldStorage and dispensing device for refrigerators
US3105320 *Aug 5, 1960Oct 1, 1963Angelo MilanosDispenser
US5289666 *Mar 20, 1986Mar 1, 1994T. W. Hamilton Design Ltd.Apparatus for applying label tags
Classifications
U.S. Classification221/19, 221/39, 194/256, 221/127, 221/6, 221/245
International ClassificationG07F11/04
Cooperative ClassificationG07F11/04
European ClassificationG07F11/04