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Publication numberUS2310504 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1943
Filing dateMay 21, 1941
Priority dateMay 21, 1941
Publication numberUS 2310504 A, US 2310504A, US-A-2310504, US2310504 A, US2310504A
InventorsAubert Fred B
Original AssigneeAubert Fred B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Control device
US 2310504 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. B. AUBERT Feb. 9, 1943.

CONTROL DEVICE Filed May 21, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet l 7/ K mm Q 5 8 m a 3 m e QJ W Q 3 @m an Q m mm 8 Nd Q INVENTOR 5/14, 6. W Y

M M ATTORNEY Feb. 9, 1943. F. B. AUBERT 2,310,504

CONTROL DEVICE Filed May 21, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1 I 75 INVENTOR Q6 3% 6. W

21 3mm M h ATTORN EY Patented Feb. 9, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CONTROL DEVICE Fred B. Aubert, Grosse Pointe, Mich. Application May 21, 1941, Serial No. 394,472

12 Claims This invention relates to new and useful improvements in control devices and more particularly to a device responsive to change in fluid pressure and which is adapted among other uses for indicating flow of fluid in ,a conduit or for actuating a control means upon the occurrence of fluid flow.

An object of the invention is to provide a control device in which fluid flow is restrained prior to the occurrence of a predetermined operating pressure or pressure differential.

Another object is to provide a novel magnetic actuator for a control means.

Another object is to provide a control means which may be intercalated a fluid conveying conduit.

Another object is to provide a control device which will assure delivery of conveyed fluid prior to operation of a controlled means.

The invention consists in the novel construction and arrangement of parts to be more fully described hereinafter and the novelty of which will be particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed.

In the accompanying drawings to be taken as a part of this specification there are fully and clearly illustrated several preferred embodiments of the invention in which drawings- Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of a portion of an oil burner control circuit and showing the control device of this invention in vertical longitudinal central section;

P18. 2 is a detail view in section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a view in horizontal section of the control device and taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a view in vertical longitudinal section of another form of control device embodying the invention, and r Fig; 5 is a diagrammatic view showing the control device as applied to the lubricating system of an internal combustion engine.

Referring, to the drawings, Figs. 1 to 3, by characters of reference the numeral I designates by the discharge portion of for example, which may function to control the generally the control device of this invention which is intercalated in a conduit or pipe line 2 having an electrically driven fuel supply pump 3 supplied with electric energy from the mains 4. The pump 3 is connected on its inlet side to a fuel source by an inlet pipe or conduit 5. The device I includes a conduit element 6 connected at its opposite ends by an inlet fitting I and an outlet fitting 8 into the conduit 2 so that the element 0 receives fuel from the pump 8 through oil burner ignition circuit, or which might be a flow indicator.

The conduit element 6 is of non-magnetic material, such as brass, and is preferably in the form of a short pipe section having an enlarged cylindrical bore I4 providing an internal annular shoulder I 5 adjacent its outlet end. The fitting 8 which connects the outlet end of the element 6 to the conduit 2 is preferably of the well known form of flared coupling having a sleeve nut It for securing the flared end of the conduit 2 to the outlet end portion ll of the conduit element. The inlet fitting 1 comprises a conduit fitting l8 which has an external clamping flange I9 in opposition to the end face of element 6 and has an end portion screw-threaded into the inlet end of the element bore It. The inlet end of the fltting i8 is externally screw-threaded to receive a coupling nut 20 for securing the flared end portion of the conduit 2 to the inlet end of the element 6. The fitting l8 has a longitudinal bore 2! which terminates at its inner end within the bore H in a cross passageway 22 which communicates at its opposite ends with the bore l4. 7 The inner end portion 23 of the fitting i8 is of reduced external diameter to provide an annular flow passagewa therearound into which the ends of passageway 22 discharge. Extending from the fitting end portion 23 and universally secured in a socket 24 therein, there is a valve member 25 of cylindrical rod form having a tapered metering slot 28 which increases in depth in the direction of flow and to the free end of the valve member as shown in Fig. 2. Longitudinally reciprocal and slidably fitting within the bore it there is a shoulder l5 and at its other end extends into an annular recess "in the piston 21 for abutment with the base of the recess to urge the piston 21 against the fitting end portion 23. The piston 21 is movable by fluid pressure acting against its end face 3| in opposition to spring 29. The piston 21, upon predetermined movement, will uncover the inlet end of metering slot 28 to permit flow through the piston bore 28 and the conduit 2 to the nozzle 9.

Adjacent the shoulder l there is a circumferential recess 32 around the element 6 and in which is positioned an end wall or support 93 having a transverse aperture 34 therethrough. At the opposite or inlet end of element 6 there is an end wall or support 35 which at its lower end has a circular aperture 36 therethrough to receive the fitting 18. The support 35 is rigidly clamped into position against the end wall of element 6 by the flange l9, suitable washers or gaskets 31 being provided to prevent leakage from the bore l4. The support 35 has an aper-.

ture 38 therethrough opposite the aperture 34, which apertures are spaced above or laterally from the element 6. Positioned in the apertures 34 and 38 are the opposite ends of a bridge supporting member 39 of electric insulating material. A removable cover or casing 48 of U- shaped form and having end flanges 4| is slipfitted over the end walls 33, 35 to provide a housing and to hold the end walls and bridg member 39 in fixed position.

Supported on the top face of the bridge member 39 there is a plate-like metal terminal mem- I ber 42 which receives a terminal screw 43 for clamping the end of the lead wire II to the member 42. The member 42 has downturned end portions 44, 44 which extend through apertures in the bridge member 39 to aid in locating and positioning the member 42. The portion 44 extends through the bridge member 39 and serves as a centering and holding means for one end of a compression spring 45 which, at its other end, bears upon and is received in a recess in one end of a switch arm 46. The bearing member 42 has downward extending bearing ears or flanges 41 which fit against the sides of the bridge member 39 and receive and support the opposite ends of a bearing shaft 48. The switch arm 46 is provided with bearing ears or flanges 49 which are apertured to receive the shaft 48 so that the switch arm is pivotally supported by the bridge member 39. The arm 46 has an extension 58 of electric insulating material on which is mounted a U-shaped permanent magnet 5| which overlies a circumferential channel 5| in the element 6. A bracket 52 of sheet metal is preferably soldered to the magnet 5| and is tightly clamped to the insulating member 50 by means of bentover ears 53. A projecting portion or stop finger 54 is stamped or formed out of the bracket 52 and is engageable with the underface of bridge member 39 to limit rotation of the switch arm under the force of spring 45. The switch l8 comprises a movable contactmember 55 carried by the free end of a resilient blade 56 which is electrically connected and secured to the arm 46 by rivets 51 which also secure the insulating member 59 to the arm 46. The ears 41 and 49 together with the shaft 48 serve to establish in part the electric circuit from the terminal screw 43 to the contact member 55. The other contact member 58 ex tends downward from the bridge member 39 toward contact member 55 and has its upper end portion extending through the bridge member 39 and a terminal plate 59, the contact member being riveted or spun over so that it serves to clamp the plate 59 to the top face of the bridge member 39. A terminal screw 60 is screwthreaded into the plate 59 and serves to clamp an end of the lead wire |2 to the plate 59.

In the operation of the control device, Figs. 1, 2 and 3, when the pump 3 is started, pressure will be built up in the conduit 2 against the inlet face 3| ofpiston 21 thereby creating a differential of fluid pressure on the opposite sides of the piston. When the fluid pressure on the piston face 3| overcomes any fluid pressure on the outlet side of the piston and the opposing force of spring 29 against the piston 21, which serves as an armature, the piston will be moved toward magnet 5|. However, before the armature or piston 21 has been moved by fluid-pressure to decrease the air gap sufliciently for movement of magnet 5|, the metering slot 26 will have been uncovered thereby permitting flow of fluid to the nozzle 9. The parts aresorelated that the armature21 must move to a position substantially completely under the magnet 5| before there is suflicient change in the magnetic force between the member 5| and 21 to overcome the spring 45 and move the switch contact 55 relative to and against contact 58. Before the armatur 21 reaches the position for operation of the switch, the metering slot 26 will be substantially wide open, that is, the end wall 3| will have been moved to a position for full flow through the conduit member 2. By providing for continued movement of armature 21 after flow starts to the nozzle 9-and before switch I9 is actuated, a proper discharge from th nozale 9 will be occurring before closure of switch l8 and operation of the relay I3. When the armature 21 is moved beneath the magnet 5|, the magnet will be snapped downward into the channel 5| by its-magnetic force until it is stopped by the wall of element 6. During the movement of the magnet 5|, the contact 55 will have engaged contact 58 so that the continued magnet movement will have stressed the blade 56 thereby providing a flrm electrical contact. Upon stoppage of the pump 3 or a predetermined decrease of pressure against the face 3|, so that the spring 29 can act, the spring 29 will move armature 21 .away from magnet 5| and toward the position shown so that the magnetic force holding switch l0 closed will be reduced thereby permitting spring 45 to open the switch. The spring 29 will then continue the movement of piston 21 until it cuts off flow through the metering slot 26 and stops further discharge from nozzle 9. It should be noted that pulsation of pressure or small change of pressure differential on opposite sides of piston 21 will not result in opening of switch Ill and the switch will not open until the piston 21 has moved substantially out from under the magnet 5|.

In Fig. 4 the control device is generally similar to that of Fig. 1, but in this form the valve member 25 which is universally supported by the end portion 23 of the-*fltting I8 is provided with a conical valve head 6| which is engageable with the annular seat of a valve port 62 in the longitudinal passageway 63 through the piston or armature 21. The inlet portion of the passageway 63 is, for substantially half its length, of converging form, as at 64, in order to lead or guide the valve head 6| to the cylindrical portion-of passageway 63. Thelengtli of the cylindrical portion of passageway 63 on the inlet side of the valve port determines the extent of movement of piston 21 under the fluid pressure against the inlet face 3| before the piston passageway is open for flow to the outlet fitting 8. In this form the bridge member 39 has internally threaded, binding posts 65, 66, secured in and extending through spaced apertures therethrough. The posts 65 and 66 are provided with screws 61 which'secure the ends 2,310 of lead wires H and I2 thereto. The post 88 serves to clampxand secure a ring-like metal terminal block 88 to the under side of bridge member 39. Within the ring or block 88 and secured thereto, there is an upward facing contact member 88 which is electrically connected to post 85 by the block 88. The post 88 receives 1 engine 14. When the engine 14 is the apertured end 10 of a resilient switch blade or arm H and serves to clamp it to the underface of bridge'member 89. The arm 1i extends through the aperture in the block 88 in overlying relation to contact member 88 and carries a cooperable" contact member 12 which is normally held out of engagement with the contact member 88 by the inherent resilience of arm H. At the free end of arm II a U-shaped permanent magnet 12 is soldered or otherwise secured. A stop member 13 extends downward from bridge member 39 for cooperable engagement with the free end of the arm II to limit upward movement of the arm and prevent its contact with the terminal post 85.

It is believed the operation of this form of control device shown in Fig. 4 will be apparent from the description of the device of Fig. 1 but may be briefly stated as follows: When the pressure acting on the face 31 of the armature or piston 21 becomes great enough to overcome any fluid pressure acting against the outlet end or other face of the piston and the force of spring 28,

the piston 21 will be moved toward the magnet 12 when suificient pressure has been built up against face 8| to overcome the opposing force, the piston will be withdrawn from the valve member so that valve head 8| will be within the tapered portion 84 of passageway 83 and there will be flow through the conduit element 8. Such movement of the piston 21 will not, however, have positioned the piston sufiiciently within the magnetic field of magnet 12 to attract the magnet and therefore switch III will remain in open position. As the pressure against face 8| increases, the piston 21 will be moved into opposed relation with magnet 12 thereby reducing the air, gap to increase the magnet attraction between members I2 and 21 such that the inherent resilience of,arm II will be overcome and contact member I2 will be pulled into engagement with contact member 88. The bowing of arm H as'magnet 12 is pulled down against conduit element 8 will hold the contact members in good electrical contact. As in Fig. 1, the vfull flow through piston 21 will occur before the magnet 12 closes switch l8.

Referring to Fig. 5, the control device I of either Fig. 1 or Fig. 4 is shown intercalated in the lubricant supply line of an internal combustion engine 14. A pump I8 driven by the engine in any suitable manner, draws lubricant from the crankcase through a pipe 18 and discharges the lubricant through pipe I! to the control device. From the control device I the lubricant flows to and througha header 18 from, which branch conduits 18 lead to the points to be lubricated. The switch It controls the circuit of the ignition transformer 80 having a battery or other source of electromotive force 8|. One contact of the switch III is connected by a lead wire 82 to the battery 8| and the other contact of switch is connected by alead wire 88 to an ignition switch 84. In the lead-wire 83 there is a signal device or alarm 85 which may be a signal lamp, 9. gong, or the like. In parallel with the switch It there is a manual starting switch 88. In operation of the system of Fig.

the switches 84 and 88 are closed which will co plete the battery circuit through the ignition transformer in order to provide ignition for the in normal operation and assuming that the pump 18 is functioning properly and is delivering oil to the header 18, the switch It will be closed by automatic magnetic action as heretoforedescribed. With the switch IO closed the switch 88 will be manually opened so that thereafter.

ignition will be maintained only as long as both switches l0 and 84 remain closed. It will be apparent that after openingiof switch 88 the engine will remain in operation only if there is lubricant supplied by the pump and supplied in sumcient quantity and at proper pressure to maintain switch l8 closed: It will also be noted that the indicator 88 will be in operation only if the pump is Supply n the necessary quantity of lubricant and will indicate failure of the lubricant supply even though switch 88 should not have been opened after. starting of the engine.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the control devices of Figs. 1 and 4 are capable of use in other types of fluid flow systems such, for example, as water sprinkler systems for extinguishment of fires, wherein the control device would indicate the flow line which is automatically placed in operation as by fusing of the usual sprinkler head.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A control device comprising a conduit element, cooperable magnet and armature members, one of said members slidably fitting within and being longitudinally slidable upon change of fluid pressure in'said conduit element, the other of said members being movably supported external of said conduit element and being movable by change in magnetic force between said members upon movement of said slidable member, and means operable upon movement of said external member.

2. A control device comprising a conduit element, cooperable magnet and armature members, one of said members slidably fitting within and being movable by change of fluid pressure in said conduit element, the other of said members being movably supported external of said conduit element and being movable by change in magnetic force between said members upon movement of said slidable member, said slidable member having a passageway therethrough, a valve member within said conduit element and cooperable with said slidable member to control flow through said passageway, and means operable upon movement of said external member.

3. A control device comprising a conduit element, cooperable magnet and armature members, one of said members slidably fitting within and being movable by change of fluid pressure in said conduit element, the other of said members being movably supported external of said conduit element and being movable by change in magnetic force between said members upon movement of said slidable member, said slidable member having a passageway therethrough, a valve member in said passageway and secured to said conduit element, said valve member having a longitudinal portion fitting said passageway and determining the extent of movement of said slidable member before occurrence of flow through said passageway, and means operable ment having a portion of non-magnetic material, cooperable magnet and armature members, said armature member being slidable within and being movable by change of fluid pressure in said conduit element, a movable control arm supported external of said conduit element, said magnet member being secured to said control arm and being movable by change in magnetic force between said members upon movement of said armature member, said magnet member being limited in its movement by engagement ber operable by said arm.

5. A 'control device comprising a condu1t element, cooperable magnet'and armature members, one of said members being slidable within and being movable by change of fluid pressure in said conduit element, a conduit flow fitting secured to and extending from said conduit element, supporting means external of and secured to said conduit element by said fitting, a movable control arm carried by said supporting means, the other of said members being secured to said arm and being movable by change in magnetic force between said members upon movement of said slidable member, a control member carried by said supporting means, and a control member cooperable with said control member and carried by said arm.

6, A control device comprising a conduit element of non-magnetic material, cooperable magnet and armature members, one of said members being slidable within and being movable by change of fluid pressure in said conduit element, a conduit flow fitting secured to and extending from said conduit element, supporting means secured to said conduit element by said fitting, a movable control arm carried by said supporting means, the other of said members being secured to said arm and being movable by change in magnetic force between said members upon movement of said slidable member, said slidable member having a passageway therethrough, a valve member carried by said fitting and extending into said passageway to control flow therethrough, a control member carried by said supporting means, and a control member cooperable with said control member and carried by said arm.

7. A control device comprising a conduit element of non-magnetic material, a piston of magnetic material slidably fitting the bore of said element and movable by fluid pressure, a spring acting on said piston and opposing movement of said piston by fluid pressure, a magnet movably supported and positioned adjacent said element, said piston having a passageway therethrough for flow through said element and being movable into a position to attract said magnet, a valve member secured to said element and extending into said passageway to determine the movement of said piston for occurrence of flow through said passageway, and switch means operable by movement of said magnet.

8. A control device comprising a conduit element of non-magnetic material, a piston of magnetic material slidably fitting the bore of said element and having a passageway therethrough, a spring acting on said piston 'and opposing movement of said piston by fluid pressure, a bridge member supported in spaced relation to said conduit element, a switch arm pivotally with said conduit portion, and a control memmounted on said bridge member and positioned between said bridge member and said conduit element, a magnet carried by said arm and movable lnto engagement with said element, a spring acting to move said arm and said magnet away ,from said element, said piston being movable by differential of fluid pressure in said conduit element and into opposing relation to said'magnet so that the magnetic force between said piston and said magnet will pull said magnet against I said conduit element and actuate said switch arm, a valve member in said passageway, means securing said valve member to said conduit element, said piston cooperating with said valve member to control flow through said conduit element and acting to open said passageway prior to operation of said arm, and switch means operable by said arm.

9. A control device comprising a conduit element, a piston of magnetic material slidably fltting the bore of said conduit element and longitudinally movable therein by change of fluid pressure, a magnet cooperable with said piston, means supporting said magnet external of and for movement toward and from said element, said magnet being moved by change in the magnetic force between said magnet and said piston, and means operable by movement of said magnet.

10. A control device comprising a conduit element, a piston of magnetic material slidably fitting the bore of said conduit element and longitudinally movable therein by change of fluid pressure, a magnet cooperable with said piston, means supporting said magnet external of and for movement toward and from said element, said magnet being moved by change in the magnetic force between said magnet and said piston, a helical coil spring extending longitudinally within said element and abutting said piston to determine the fluid pressure at which said piston effects operation of said magnet, and means operable by movement of said magnet.

11. A control device comprising a conduit element, a pair of supports spaced longitudinally of and extending in opposed relation from said element, a bridge member extending between said supports in spaced relation to said conduit element, a magnet positioned between said bridge.

member and said conduit element, a movable operating arm carrying said magnet and mounted on said bridge member, a control means operable by said a-rm, and a pressure responsive piston of magnetic material cooperable with said magnet and reciprocal within said conduit element.

12. A control device comprising a conduit element, a pair of supports spaced longitudinally of and extending in opposed relation from said element, a bridge member extending between said supports in spaced relation to said conduit element, a magnet positioned between said bridge member and said conduit element, a movable operating arm carrying said magnet and mounted on said bridge member, a control means operable by said arm, a conduit flow fitting screw-threaded to said conduit element and clamping one of said supports to said conduit element, and a pressure responsive piston of magnetic material cooperable with said magnet and reciprocal within said conduit element.

FRED B. AUBERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2436815 *Mar 15, 1944Mar 2, 1948Gen ElectricPressure operated valve
US2627846 *May 24, 1948Feb 10, 1953Cutler Hammer IncFluid pressure impact device
US2648225 *Jan 15, 1951Aug 11, 1953A V Hemmens Pty LtdLiquid metering device
US2887546 *Jun 26, 1957May 19, 1959W E Anderson IncHigh pressure, explosion proof, fluid flow controlled electrical switch
US2914631 *Nov 20, 1957Nov 24, 1959Glascock Brothers Mfg CompanyProduct empty mechanism
US2963563 *May 22, 1958Dec 6, 1960Houdaille Industries IncFlow actuated signalling device for low and/or intermittent flow rates
US3008018 *May 26, 1958Nov 7, 1961Hammond John SMagnetic switch or valve operator
US3057977 *Nov 27, 1959Oct 9, 1962Raytheon CoFlow switches
US3126463 *Feb 16, 1961Mar 24, 1964 figure
US3303852 *Feb 6, 1962Feb 14, 1967Miller Avy LAutomatic actuated flow controlled valve
US3421124 *Mar 17, 1967Jan 7, 1969Kidd Joseph VDetector switch
US3510616 *Oct 28, 1968May 5, 1970Universal Oil Prod CoVenturi operated flow switch
US3569648 *Feb 7, 1969Mar 9, 1971Schaub Engineering Co IncFluid pressure magnetically operated switch with improved flow-responsive actuator means
US3632923 *Sep 24, 1969Jan 4, 1972NasaFlow-rate switch
US4071725 *Feb 27, 1976Jan 31, 1978Ibec Industries, Inc.Proximity switch for fluid cylinders
US4658646 *Oct 3, 1985Apr 21, 1987Maloney Pipeline Products CompanyMagnetic actuator for mechanical indicator of change of state in a pressurizeable system
US5126722 *Feb 4, 1991Jun 30, 1992Lubriquip, Inc.Point of lube monitor
US8590562Dec 17, 2010Nov 26, 2013Lincoln Industries CorporationFluid flow detection device
DE1152176B *Feb 8, 1960Aug 1, 1963Keelavite Co LtdElektrisches Steuergeraet mit einem magnetischen Kreis
DE1290224B *Jan 31, 1963Mar 6, 1969Wetron VebMagnetschalter
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/81.90M, 200/81.00R, 123/146.50C, 200/81.90R
International ClassificationG05D16/20, G01P13/00, H01H36/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01P13/002, H01H36/00, G05D16/2093
European ClassificationH01H36/00, G01P13/00B2A, G05D16/20H