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Publication numberUS2310570 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1943
Filing dateOct 30, 1937
Priority dateOct 30, 1937
Publication numberUS 2310570 A, US 2310570A, US-A-2310570, US2310570 A, US2310570A
InventorsBriggs Merton B
Original AssigneeI A Simon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stabilizer
US 2310570 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 9, 1943. M. B. BRIGGS STABILIZER I 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Oct. 30, 1937 I the effect of such sudden force.

Patented Feb. 9, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE" STABILIZER Merton B.-Briggs, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor to I. A. Simon, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Application October 30, 1937, Serial No. 112,034

' 26 Claims.

This invention relates to a stabilizing device and is an improvement on the structure shown in the United States Patent to MacLellan No. 2,058,384, October 20, 1936, and my pending application Serial No. 143,157, now Patent No. 2,151,851 issued March 28, 1939, and is used in connection with the steering mechanism of an automobile.

Stabilizers of this type are designed to be positioned between the chassis of the vehicle and a. movable member of the steering mechanism or are adapted to be connected between relative y movable parts of the steering mechanism. The stabilizer of this invention includes a closed cylinder adapted to contain fluid in which a piston is reciprocated under the influence of the normal operation of the steering mechanism. The fluid will normally flow through a restricted passage in the piston head but when any road shock is encountered such as would tend to wrest control of the steering mechanism from the driver, the device becomes instantly operative to overcome The stabilizer normally presents no appreciable resistance to the usual driving effort, but under any condition of road shock, the resistance offered to the hydraulic medium e. g. 'oil through the piston head is so great that it momentarily operates'the valve means located therein to prevent the flow of fluid, and thus instantaneously prevents movement of the steering mechanism under the influence of the shock.

It is necessary that the stabilizer be thoroughly reliable at all times and the present invention ielates to an improved piston that promotes reliability by making the operation of the stabilizer uniform under all conditions of temperature. As will be appreciated, the viscosity of the hydraulic fluid changes under the influence of the temperature and it is an important feature of this invention to provide thermal compensating means to render the operation uniform under all such changes of viscosity. This thermally re-.

sponsive compensating means is incorporated in 'the piston head and is operative to effectively maintain the resistance of the flow passage constant regardless of the viscosity of the fluid.

In stabilizers of this type it has been foun that the instantaneous closing of the valve'is more effective when the piston is moving in one direction than when it is moving in the other, that is, the same valve means in the piston is more sensitive when moving in one direction than when moving in the other. Therefore, in order to make the operation of the device uniform in both directions of piston movement, it is a further object of this invention to provide means to render the operation of the valve equally sensitive regardless of the direction of piston movement.

'Another object of the invention is to provide a piston head that embodies the features set out above and is extremely simple in construction, easily assembled, and completely reliable in operation.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view showing the stablizer associated with a conventional rigid axle front wheel suspension steering mechanism.

Figure 2 is a sectional view of the stabilizer taken on line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Figure .2. I

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Figure 2. i

Figure 5 is a sectional view of the piston head showing the bimetallic element contracted under the influence of a reduced temperature.

Figure 6 is a'sectional view of a preferred form of stabilizer taken on line 22 of Figure 1, the same being an improvement on the structure shown in Figure 2.

Figure 7 is a sectional view of the construction shown in Figure 6 and taken on line 1-4 of Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a sectional view of the construction shown in Figure 6 and taken on'line 8-8 of Figure 6.

The stabilizer of the MacLellan type as explained in the aforesaid patent is particularly adapted to be used in connection with the steering mechanism of an automobile. The method in which such devices are associated with the steering mechanism is set forth in the said patent and my aforesaid application.

Referring to Figure 1, the stabilizer is shown associated with a conventional rigid axle front wheel suspension wherein I0 is the front axle and it the tie rod of the vehicle. The stabilizer 12 is connected between the axle and tie rod preferably having its cylinder end connected to the spring pad 53 by means of the ball joint it and with the piston end connected to the tie rod by means of a second ball joint [5.

Referring to Figure 2, the stabilizer includes a cylinder I6 closed at its ends by'threaded caps H and adapted to contain a suitable hydraulic sion53 of substantially frusto-conical shape. A

second plate 58 cooperates with the plate'l'ii to confine a compressible packing material 55.

This latter plate has a frusto-conical portion terminating in a cylindrical portion as shown. The plate 54 is movable, but is held against bodily movement outwardly of the cylinder by the cap I! engaging a spacer member 56 which acts as a stop for the plate as shown. The coil spring 5'! engages a plate 58 in the cylindrical end of the plate 54 which plate 58 bears on the packing. The other end of the spring engages a packing 59 disposed in a recess in the cap l1. By this construction, when the valve locks and I moves in the direction of the packing, the same is compressed between the movable plate 5| and the plate 54 and thereby caused to flow laterally, and seal the chamber wall and periphery of the piston rod against leakage of the operating fluid. A stop flange 2D is provided adjacent the inner end of the piston rod I8,- and the portion 2| of the rod between this flange and the extreme inner end of the rod is reduced in diameter and threaded. A piston head 22 is threadedly fitted upon the end 2| of the piston rod, and between this head and the stop flange or shoulder 20, there is disposed upon the piston rod a spacer or ring member 23 having a squared periphery. A similar spacer or ring member 26 is positioned between the head and the lock nut 25.

The piston head 22 which closely fits the wall of the cylinder I6 is provided with a plurality of openings 24 adjacent its periphery, these openings being circumferentially spaced as shown in Figure 3. 0n opposite sides of the head and slidably mounted on the spacers 23 and 2B are bi-metallic discs 21 and 28 of less thickness than the thickness of the spacers and which discs are provided with radially extending, circumferentially spaced, arms 29 and 30 respectively that cooperate with the openings 24 to govern the flow of fluid through the piston head 22. It will be observed that the discs are movable upon the spacer members which act as guides therefor and the spacer members are held in fixed relation to the head and the openings 24 therein by means of pins 23', 26' respectively so that the arms 29 and 30 are at all times maintained in proper registration with the openings 24 in the piston head.

The arms 29 and 30 are thermally responsive and form a part of the compensating means built into the device. The operation of these arms will appear more fully below. A plurality of springs 32 which pass through openings 24 engage the ends of the arms to resiliently maintain the discs 21 and 28 and the arms carried thereby spaced away from the adjacent face of the head to normally maintain the flow passage through the openings 24 relatively unobstructed. The free area A between the arms 29 of disc 21 is less than the free area B between the arms of disc 28, this being for a purpose which will be hereinafter explained. The springs 32 are preferably but not necessarily formed of bimetallic metal.

The operation of the device is as follows:

The stabilizer being positioned between the axle ID and the tie rod II as shown in Figure 1, during the normal functioning of the steering mechanism, when the vehicle is turned the tie rod is thereby caused to move relative to the axle, and the piston 22, moving with the tie rod, will reciprocate in the cylinder l6 and the fluid contained in the cylinder will flow freely back and forth through the openings 24 in the piston head, i. e. the fluid flows around the edges of the arms 29 or 30 as the case may be, through openings 24 in piston head 22 and out around the edges of the arms of the disc on the opposite side of the head.

If any unusual force is encountered by one of the front wheels such as a hole, rut, flat tire, sand, etc., the relative movement between the tie rod and axle is greatly and suddenly increased or accelerated due to the sharp diverting force produced by such conditions, which diverting force would normally wrest the steering mechanism out of the driver's control. However, when the stabilizer is connected between these parts as in Figure 1, due to the sudden increase in relative movement between the tie rod and axle, the piston is caused to reciprocate at a sharply accelerated rate in the cylinder and the velocity of the fluid flowing through the piston head is likewise rapidly increased. If for instance the piston is forced to quickly move to the right in Figure 2 and extra resistance is built up by the oil flowing around the edges of the arms 30 which, coupled with the fluid pressure built up against the forward face of the arms 39 instantaneously overcomes the springs 32 and slides the disc 28 and the arms 30 against head 22 whereby the arms cover the openings 24 and seal the same against passage of fluid. With the apertures 24 sealed, no fluid can flow past the piston head and therefore, the piston is held against further movement toward the right relaj tive to the cylinder. This holding of the piston against movement relative to the cylinder is momentary but is for a sufficient time period to prevent the steering mechanism from turning in response to the shock and the effect of the shock is arrested. Thus the driver retains control of the vehicle. Stated in another way, with the closing of the openings or apertures 24, there takes place a momentary locking of the parts which prevents the tie rod II from moving relative to the axle Ill so that the shock encountered is not transmitted to the steering mechanism in a manner to cause the front wheels to divert from their normal course and the front wheels are thus momentarily prohibited from turning.

It is evident of course that if the wheels were suddenly subjected to a force tending to divert them in the opposite diection causing the piston to reciprocate to the left in Figure 2 the arms 29 would be seated, and the operation of the parts would otherwise be exactly as just described.

It will be understood that the discs 21 and 28 and the arms 29 and 30 are prevented from seating against piston head 22 during normal operation because the springs 32 are tensioned to overcome the normal resistance of fluid flow through the piston. But when, as above explained, a sudden shock accelerates the flow of fluid through the passage and the flow resistance and the fluid pressure on the surface of the arms are thereby increased, the tension of springs 32 is overcome and either the disc 21 and its arms 29 or disc 28 and its arms 3|] are forced against one or the other face of the head depending upon the direction in which the force of the shock is exerted.

When the shock or diverting force has been dissipated i. e. arrested, the pressure built up in the end of the cylinder will be quickly released by a comparatively slow by-passing of fluid which takes place around the periphery of head 22 i. e. between the periphery of the head 22 and the cylinder wall I 6. This release of pressure takes place substantially instantaneously after the shock is arrested, the pressures onboth sides of the piston head being thus equalized, the springs 32 will force the respective seated disc and its arms away from the head'and normal operation of the steering mechanism is again had. It is to be understood of course that though the head closely fits the cylinder, 9. small amount of fluidwill flow or by-pass around its periphery and the releasing action above described is instantaneous once the shock or unusualforce has been dissipated.

As previously expressed stabilizers of this type have'been found to be more sensitive whenthe and thus compensate for an increase in the viscosity of fluid due to a reduced temperature.

It is to be understood that the relative thickness of the bimetallic discs 21 and 28 is controlled with relation to the thickness of the ring members 28 and 28 or vice versa so that the discs will have a proper sliding operation under the forces exerted upon either side of the piston head, such that the sharp arresting of diverting forces as above explained and instantaneous release of the locking action will be obtained. The thicmessratio will be determined in most cases by the nature of the hydraulic fluid and the internal diameter of the cylinder.

The preferred form of the device is shown in Figures 6 to 8 inclusive wherein a portion to of proportioning the free. or open areas A and B between the arms as and 30 respectivelyand around their ends. It will be appreciated that the velocity of a liquid flowing through a passage depends upon the cross sectional area of the passage. As the area decreases the velocity increases, and as the velocity increases the resistance increases. This is known as Bemouli's theorum. The flow passage in one instance will be from the left hand chamber through the free area A through the openings 24 through free areas B into the right hand chamber, upon the wheels being turned in the opposite direction the flow will be reversed. Thus referring to Figure 3, the free area A between arms 29 is less than the free area 13 between the arms 30 shown in Figure 4, and therefore, a greater resistance is offered by disc 21 to the normal flow of fluid. This is preferably accomplished by making the overall diameter of the arms 30 less than the overall diameter of the arms 29 as shown.

when the piston moves toward the end through which the piston rod enters the cylinder in the present day stabilizers, the valve. mechanism has been found not to be as sensitive as when moving toward the opposite end of the cylinder. In order to overcome this tendency the resistance offered to the flow of fluid from the pistonrod side has, as explained, been made greater by decreasing the free area A between arms 29. So in moving in thatdirection or toward the left in Figure 2, the usual flow resistance and the increased resistance built up under a shock will as quickly attain sufllcient force to seat the arms against the head as when the piston is acted upon by a force causing .it to move in the other direction.

Also it has been found desirable in order to promote a more reliable operation of the stabilizer to provide means to maintain the flow resistance constant when the viscosity of the fluid changes. This is accomplished by making the discs 21 and 28 and the arms 29 and 30 integral thereon of bimetallic metal. when the temperature varies the bimetallic elements will respond thereto and cause the arms to bend away from or toward the piston head to increase or decrease the distance between the arms and the adjacent face of the head and therefore the flow resistance accordingly depending upon whether the viscosity is greater or less. As shown in Figure 5, the arms have been caused to bend away from the head to reduce the flow resistance the inner end of the piston rod is is cut square and the extreme end is threaded as at M. The discs 39 and d8 of bimetallic metal and the piston head as are provided with square apertures in their central .portions to slidably flt onto the squared portion 39 of the piston rod. The said discs as and dd are provided with integral bi-.

metallic arms M and d2 respectively which have depressions 6% formed adjacent their outer extremities that cooperate with apertures or openings at in piston head t3, the apertures 65 being similar to openings 2 3. The discs and piston head are mounted in spaced relation on the end 38 of the piston rod and are held in fixed relation by nut 41. A spacing ring at is placed; between disc at and nut d1 so that the nut wiil'not interfere with the flexing of the arm 32 either due to fluid movement or to temperature changes. Thearms 4i and 42 are held spaced from the piston head preferably by bi-metallic springs 49 positioned in the openings or apertures 85 and retained between the extremities of the arms 4| and 42, the depressed portions as of which of the spring increases as the temperature induced temperatures.

creases. The reverse is true when the inner metal of the helical form has the greater coeflicient of expansion. This characteristic of a bi-metallic spring has been taken advantage of to obtain the increased tension desired when the working fluid increases in viscosity due to re- By winding the spring so that the inner metal has the greater coemcient of expansion, the tension of the spring increases as the temperature decreases.

Referring to Figure 6, the packing I9 includes a gland housing 60 which is held in position against the cap I! and the adjacent end of the cylinder as shown. The housing at its inner end is provided with a circular flange 6| defining an opening of substantially greater diameter than the diameter of the piston rod whereby fluid may act upon the packing within the housing. Within the housing there isdisposed a movable plate 62 exposed to the fluid as shown and bearing against said flange SI for confining layers of compressible packing material 63. A

coil spring 64 bears "against a movable plate 65 which confines the packing within the housing at that end thereof. The spring at its opposite end engages a packing 66 disposed in the recess These springs Figure 6 is the same as explained with reference to the device shown in Figure 2 except that the arms 4| and 42 flex about the spacers 48' instead of having the discs carrying the arms slide into engagement with the head. This is possible because the depressions 48 flt into and seal the apertures 45. The depressions 46 and the bimetallic springs 49 make for a more sure and even operation of the stabilizer under all conditions. It is seen that the springs increase or decrease their tension to balance out changes in flow resistance caused by viscosity change of the fluid and the depressions 4B insure the complete coverage and sealing of apertures 45 as-the bimetallic arms 4| and 42 are caused to warp under changes of temperature,

Bleeder openings can, of course, be formed in the ends of the arms 21 and 28 in registered relation with the opening 24 or in the depressions 46 to register with the openings 45, but it is preferred to by-pass the fluid between the periphery of the piston head and the wall of the cylinder.

It is to be understood that the invention herein shown and described is subject to numerous other modifications and variations, all of which are considered to be comprehended within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A stabilizer of the type described having a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston means comprising a head provided with openings, said head being mounted adjacent the end of the piston rod and having disks mounted on opposite sides thereof, said disks being provided with a plurality of arms that cooperate with said openings to control the flow of fluid through said head, said arms being adapted to permit free flow under normal flow condition and to cut off flow under the conditions existing when an abnormal shock is encountered, and said arms being thermally responsive to compensate for viscosity changes of the contained fluid. t

2. A stabilizer of the type described having a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston comprising a head having a plurality of openings therethrough, said head being mounted adjacent the end of the piston rod and having disks mounted on opposite sides thereof, said disks being provided with bimetallic arms to cooperate with said openings and being adapted to completely close said openings when an abnormal shock is encountered to control the flow of fluid through the piston.

3. A stabilizer of the type described having a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston comprising a head having openings therein, said head being mounted adjacent the end of the piston rod and being provided with disks on opposite sides thereof, said disks having arms to cooperate with said openings, the free area between said arms and around their ends being so proportioned as to control the normal flow resistance of the piston head.

4. A stabilizer including a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston having an apertured head and thermally responsive compensating means cooperating with said apertures positioned on opposite sides of said head, said means being operative to normally permit a free flow of fluid through said head and being operative to cut off the flow of fluid when an abnormal shock is encountered, said means being also operative to compensate for changes in the viscosity of the hydraulicfluid contained in said cylinder.

5. A stabilizer including a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston, adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston having an apertured head with disks mounted on opposite sides thereof, said disks having arms cooperating with said apertures and being adapted to completely cut oil flow of fluid through said piston when an abnormal shock is encountered, said disks and arms forming compensating means to make the action of the device uniform in both directions of movement under all conditions.

6. A stabilizer including a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston having an apertured piston head and disks mounted on opposite sides thereof, said disks being provided with arms adapted to cooperate with said apertures, said arms being bimetallic and normally held spaced from said apertures and being adapted to substantially close said apertures only when an abnormal shock is encountered.

7. A stabilizer including a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston having an apertured head having disks mounted on opposite sides 'thereof, said disks being provided with arms adapted to cooperate with said apertures, said arms being normally held spaced from said apertures by bimetallic springs.

8. A stabilizer of the type described comprising a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston being provided with an apertured head having disks mounted on opposite sides thereof, said disk being provided with bimetallic arms to cooperate wtih said apertures, said arms being normally resiliently spaced away from said apertures by bimetallic springs passing through said apertures.

9. A stabilizer of the type described comprising a cylinder adapted to contain a fluid and a piston adapted to reciprocate therein, said piston having an apertured head having disks disposed on opposite sides thereof, said disks being proso that fluid may pass freely therethrough during reciprocation of the piston, said arms being adapted to move fromsaid spaced position to substantially instantaneously seal said openings against the flow of any fluid therethrough when an abnormal speed of reciprocation is imparted to said means whereby further reciprocation of said means is instantaneously and completely arrested unti1 the force tending to produce such abnormal speed is overcome.

- '11. A stabilizer of the type described having a cylinder adapted to contain a hydraulic fluid, a piston means adapted to reciprocate therein,

said means including a head having a plurality of openings therein, said head being mounted adjacent the end of the piston rod, discs positioned on opposite sides of said head, said discs being slidably mounted on said piston rod and being provided with arms cooperating with said openings, said arms being resiliently spaced from said openings by a plurality of springs so that fiuid'may pass freely therethrough during reciprocation of the piston and being adapted to move from said spaced position to substantially instantaneously seal said openings against the flow of any fluid therethrough when an abnormal speed of reciprocation is imparted to said means whereby further reciprocation of said means is instantaneously and completely arrested until the force tending to produce such abnormal speed is overcome.

12. A stabilizer of the type described having a cylinder adapted to contain a hydraulic fluid, a piston means adapted to reciprocate therein, said means including a head having a plurality of openings therein, said head being mounted adjacent the end of the piston rod, discs positioned on opposite sides of said head, said discs being slidably mounted onsaid piston rod and being provided with arms cooperating with said openings, said arms being resiliently spaced from said openings by a plurality of springs positioned in said openings and engaging the ends of said arms so that fluid may pass freely therethrough during reciprocation of thepiston and said arms being adapted to move from said spaced position to substantially instantaneously seal said openings against the fiow of any fluid therethrough when an abnormal speed ofreciprocation is imparted to said means whereby further reciprocation of said means is instantaneously and completely arrested until the force tending to produce such abnormal speed is overcome.

13. A stabilizer of the type described having a cylinder adapted to contain a hydraulic fluid, a piston means adapted to reciprocate therein, said means including a head having a plurality of openings therein, said head being mounted ad.- iacent the end of the tioned on opposite sides of said head, said discs being fixedly mounted on said piston rod, said discs being provided with arms cooperating with said openings, said armsnormally eing resiliently spaced from said openings by a plurality of springs positioned in said openingsand engaging said arms so that fluid may pass freely therethroughduring reciprocation of the piston and said arms being adapted to flex from said spaced position to substantially seal said openings against the flow or any fluid therethrough when an abnormal speed of reciprocation is imparted tosaid means whereby further reciprocation of said-means. is instantaneously and completely arrested until the force tending to produce such abnormal speed is overcome.

14. In a stabilizing device, a cylinder containing liquid, a rod having a piston slidably mounted in the cylinder, and yieldingly connectedpressure responsive valve means, one associated with-eachside of the piston to permit the rod to move freely in either direction in the cylinder below a predetermined speed and to check the movement of the rod within the cylinder above said predetermined speed, the valve means remote from the rod being smaller in area than the valve means adjacent the rod 15. A steering stabilizer for a vehicle comprising a cylinder and rod one of which is attached means on each piston rod, discs, posito a fixed part of the vehicle and the other to a movable part of the steering mechanism, liquid L in the cylinder, a piston carried by the rod and slidable in the cylinder and having an opening, a pair of valve means associated with said piston, each of which is operable at times to close said opening, resilient means common to both valve means and disposed in said opening and one of said valve means having a smaller area than the other.

16. In a device to check movement in excess of a predetermined speed, a cylinder having a quantity of liquid therein, a rod movable in the cylinder, a piston having an aperture and carried by the rod, a pressure responsive valve side of the piston for control of the aperture through the piston, a common spring means passing through the aperture and positioned between the valve means normally retaining the valve means open, said valve means operable to check the flow of liquid in either direction through the piston when a predetermined pressure is developed.

17. A stabilizer for the steering mechanism of a vehicle comprising a liquid containing cylinder and a piston movable therein, said stabilizer adapted for connection between a part of the vehicle stationary with respect to the steering mechanism and the steering mechanism, said piston having an intermediate portion slidably engaging the inside face of the cylinder, the end parts of the piston, one on each side of said intermediate portion, being of substantially less diameter than the inside of the cylinder, a valve member slidably mounted on each of said parts and springs normally holding each member away from said intermediate portion, said intermediate portion having at least one passage extending through it at a location radially outward from the end parts, said piston being impassable to the fiow of liquid radially inward from said passage, and a passageway at each member extending from one side of the member to the other, the passageways at the members being out of alignment with the passage in the intermediate portion, when said members are in normal position a substantial flow being permitted through a passageway at one of said members, thence radially between said latter memberand said intermediate portion, thence through said passage, thence radially between the other member and the intermediate portion and then through the passageway at said other member, the first of said members substantially closingv oil the space between itself and the intermediate portion when a sudden relative motion of the piston and the cylinder displaces said first member from its normal position.

18. A stabilizer for the steering mechanism of a vehicle comprising a liquid containing chamber and a plunger movable therein, said stabilizer adapted for connection between a part of the vehicle stationary with respect to the steering mechanism and the steering mechanism, said plunger having an intermediate portion with its engaging the inside face of the chamber substantially preventing liquid from passing between said periphery and said face, the end parts of the plunger being of less crosssection than said intermediate portion, a valve member slidably mounted on each of said parts,

and springs normally holding the members away from said intermediate portion, said intermediate portion having at least one passage extending through it at a location radially outward from the end parts, said plunger being impassable to flow of liquih radially inward from said passage, said members having their outer periphery noncircular in outline providing thereby passages between the members and to the inside of the chamber for permitting a substantial flow of liquid from one side of them to the other, said members having imperforate portions opposite the ends of said passage, the members when in normal position permitting liquid to flow through said passage, said latter'flow being substantially cut off when a sudden relative motion of the plunger and chamber displaces a member from its normal position to move it to the intermediate portion.

19. A stabilizer for the steering mechanism of a vehicle, comprising a liquid containing chamber and a plunger movable therein, said stabilizer adapted for connection between a part of the vehicle stationary with respect to the steering mechanism and the steering mechanism, said plunger having a portion with its periphery slidably engaging the inside face of the chamber substantially preventing liquid from passing between said periphery and said face, valve members adjacent said portion one on each side thereof and slidable to and from said portion, said portion having-a plurality of passages extending through it, and springs extending through said passages into contact with the members on either side of said portion for normally holding the members away from said portion, said members having imperforate portions opposite the ends of said passages, said members when in normal position permitting liquid to flow through said passages, said latter flow being substantially cut oil when a sudden relative motion of the plunger and chamber displaces a member from its normal position to move it to said portion.

20. A steering stabilizer mechanism comprising a cylinder, a rod slidably mounted therein, an apertured piston attached to one end of the rod, disc valves mounted on both faces of the piston, and yielding means urging said discs away from the piston, the disc valve remote from the rod being smaller than that adjacent the rod.

21. An apertured piston attachable to a rod, and valve means mounted thereon regulating fiow through the apertures, comprising discs on both sides of the piston axially slidable in relation to the piston, and means yieldingly urging the discs apart, the disc remote from the rod attachment being of smaller diameter than the disc adjacent the rod attachment.

22. In a steering stabilizer for vehicles, a cylinder having a quanttiy of liquid therein, a rod slidably mounted in the cylinder, connecting means between the cylinder and rod and a fixed part of the vehicle and a movable part of the steering mechanism, an apertured piston carried by the rod, pressure responsive valve means comprising spaced discs positioned adjacent said piston, and yielding means urging the discs away from the piston to enable liquid to flow through the apertured piston when the velocity of travel of the rod is below a predetermined value, the disc remote from the rod having an area smaller than the disc adjacent the rod.

23. In a steering stabilizer for vehicles, a cylinder having a quantity of liquid therein, a rod slidable within the cylinder, valve means carried by the rod comprising an apertured body member, spaced discs adjacent the body member and adapted to close the apertures in the body member under certain operating conditions, one of said discs having a smaller area than the other, and yielding means common to both discs and passing through the apertured body member for urging the spaced discs away from the body member.

ing liquid, a rod having a piston slidably mounted in the cylinder, and yieldingly connected pressure responsive valve means, one associated with each side of the piston to permit the rod to move freely in either direction in the cylinder below a predetermined speed and to check the move ment of the rod within the cylinder above said predetermined speed, the valve means remote from the rod being smaller in area than the valve means adjacent the rod to allow speedier passage of liquid as compared to passage in the opposite direction, shoulders positioned on opposite sides of and fixed with respect to said piston, spacing means confined between said piston and said shoulders, said valve means being slidably mounted on said spacing means between said shoulders and said piston whereby when said valve means are moved against said piston in response to a speed above said predetermined speed the rod movement is stopped.

25. In a stabilizing device, a cylinder containing liquid, a rod having a piston slidably mounted in the cylinder, and yieldingly connected pres sure responsive valve means, one associated with each side of the piston to permit the rod to move freely in either direction in the cylinder below a predetermined speed and to check the movement of the rod within the cylinder above said predetermined speed, the valve means remote from the rod being smaller in area than the valve means adjacent the rod to allow speedier passage of liquid as compared to passage in the opposite direction, shoulders spaced from opposite sides of said piston, and spacing means between said piston and shoulders, said valve means being slidably mounted on said spacing means and being normally biased by reason of said yielding connection toward said shoulders, said valve means being slid against said piston to cut off the flow of liquid through the piston when said rod moves above said predetermined speed whereby further movement of said rod is checked.

26. In a device to check movement in excess of a predetermined speed, a cylinder having a quantity of liquid therein, a rod movable in the cylinder, an apertured piston carried by the rod, pressure responsive valve means associated with each side of the piston, and a compressible member normally retaining the valve means open. said valve means operative to check the flow of liquid in either direction through the piston when a predetermined pressure is developed, the valve means on the side of the piston adjacent to the rod being designed to respond to a lesser pressure than the valve means remote from the rod, to allow slower passage of liquid as compared to passage in the opposite direction.

MERTON B. BRIGGS.

24. In a stabilizing device, a cylinder contain-

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Classifications
U.S. Classification188/276, 137/854, 188/282.8, 137/468, 236/101.00E, 188/300, 188/280, 137/613, 137/599.1, 236/101.00R, 188/27, 188/317
International ClassificationF16F9/50, F16F9/52
Cooperative ClassificationF16F9/52
European ClassificationF16F9/52