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Publication numberUS2313120 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1943
Filing dateDec 11, 1941
Priority dateDec 11, 1941
Publication numberUS 2313120 A, US 2313120A, US-A-2313120, US2313120 A, US2313120A
InventorsCharles D Bonsall
Original AssigneeStandard Railway Devices Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerator car
US 2313120 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. D. BoNsALL 2,313,120 RBFRIGERATOR CAR Filed Dec. 11, ,1941 4 .sheets-sheet 2 vMarch 9, 1943.

. Vf/,zz/enzar l v C/z @Mga/250mg!! March 9, 1943. c. D. BoNsALL.

VREFRIIGEMTOR CAR Filed Dec. 11, 1941 4 Sheefs-Sheet 3 [72 uen Zar.' Charlas i90/25a!! M9 1943- c. D. BoNsALL. 2,313,120`

' I REFRIGERATOR CAR v sued neg. 11, 1941 4 sheets-Sheena Fggf@ Patented Mar. 9, 1943 REFRIGERATOR CAR Charles D. vBonsall, Chicago, Ill., assigner to v @y Standard Railway Devices Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Delaware Y Application December 11, 1941, Serial No.A 422,498

14 Claims.

The device or system relates to insulated refrigerator cars used to transport perishable commodities, such as vegetables, fruits, berries, meats, eggs, frozen fish, etc., and to maintain such commodities while in transit within a predetermined range of temperatures, thus necessitating the use of a cooling means in the summer and a heating means in the winter. It, has been found that perishable commodities which have not been allowed to get too cold (freeze) or too hot (bake) have a high market value because they have a longer storage life.

The object of the invention is to provide a cooling means in a refrigerator car which will obtain a lower temperature or a more even temperature of the lading in the car than in the present conventional refrigerator car; retard car wall leakage by retarding infiltration of air through the vertical walls of the car; to vary the amount of refrigeration produced without increasing or decreasing the amount of refrigerant; to provide means-to refrigerate one side of the car more or less than the other side of the car without increasing or decreasing the amount of refrigerant; to increase the lading capacity of the car; to rapidly reduce the teinperature of a warm lading in the car; to provide a car adaptable to use either wet ice, dry ice, eutectic ice or brine as a refrigerant, and to provide a single refrigerant container in which either a solid or a liquid 'refrigerant may be used.

Another object of the invention is to obtain a positive circulation of air between a refrigerant chamber and the lading compartment of a refrigerator car; to obtain a relatively short path of movement of the circulating air and a relatively fast movement of the circulating air; thereby obtaining a lower temperature and a more even temperature to the circulating air, and also obtaining a lower temperature and a more even temperature of the car lading than in the conventional end bunker refrigerator car. 'By obtaining a lower temperature to the circulating air between the refrigerant and the lading a warm load (such as fruit with the iield vheat therein)v can be cooled quicker than in the conventional car, thus reducing the amount of spoilage which frequently occurs when the cooling system is too slow, therefore, another object of the invention is to provide a cooling means which can be used to precool a car before it is loaded or precool a warm lading after it is loaded in the car and before the car is moved.

Another object, of the invention is to provide a positive circulation of air between thev refrigthe car.

erant chamber and lading compartment of a refrigerator car by placing the refrigerant chamber in the upper part of the lading compartment and providing an uninterrupted insulated flue from the refrigerant chamber to an air space below a foraminous secondary floor, and a'further object is to form the floor of the refrigerant chamber to cause the cooled air to move by gravity into the above mentioned insulated flue and to form the ceiling of the lading compartment to direct; the air warmed by the lading into the refrigerant chamber.

Anotherobjectv ofthe invention is to provide a heating means below the lading compartment, or adjacentthe lower part thereof, (or perhaps in the air space below the foramnous floor) so that said ceiling will direct the air warmed by the heating means into the refrigerant chamber and said chamber iioorA will cause the relatively means so that the movements of the air current between the respective refrlgerants and the v lading compartment will bev in coextensive vertical planes extendingcrosswise or laterally of In the present so-called end bunker car a refrigerant chamber is located at each end of the car and assuch a car is about thirtyfour feet between end bunker bulkheads, the length of the path of circulating air in onehorizontal direction is one-'half of this distance or seventeen feet; whereas in my arrangement, the length of each path of circulating air in one horizontal vdirection is about four feet. This means thatfeven though the speed of the movement of air isfthe same in my car as in the conventionalrend bunker car (which it is not) the circulating air would more frequently be cooled by the refrigerant which would result in a colder air and a more even temperature of the circu- ,lating air and also a colder lading and a more v cool the lading. However, this is now customary.

Another object is to so place refrigerant containers near the roof and adjacent the side walls of the car so as to provide iues between the refrigerant and the walls, roof, drip pan and adjacent containers, whereby air may circulate on all six sides of the container `(that is, completely surround it), so as to obtain the maximum area of refrigerant exposure to the circulating air. Y

Another object of the invention is to provide somewhat independent movements of circulating air adjacent each` side wall of the car which cooperate to balance each other under normal conditions andmaintain substantially vthe same temperatures on both sides of the car, and another object is to provide means to cause the refrigerating meansor heating means on one side of the carto function more than the 'corresponding means on the other side of the car. When trains are making long runs from west to east (as from .Wenatchee, Washington, to New York, N. Y.,) in the winter it may be desirable to heat the north side of the train more than the south side thereof.

preventing leakage or shortsiin the circulating air system which would decrease the volume of moving air and also reduce its speed. A more rapid circulation of air causes the air to come in contact more frequently with the refrigerant thereby lowering the temperature of the air so as to increase its heat absorbing capacity. In other words, one of the objects is to provide a positive or forced .circulation of air between the refrigerant and the lading in the car. v

Another object is lto p rovide a refrigerant container positioned relative to the air flues to cause circulation of air between the refrigerant chamber and the lading compartment of the car inv which either a wet ice, dry ice, eutectic ice or brine may be used as a refrigerant, and a. further object is to provide a wet ice container (with foraminous walls) in which a dry ice container (with solid walls) may be placed in such a position so that the dry ice will function as a refrigerant to cause the aforesaid circulation of air betweenthe refrigerant chamber and lading compartment.

Another object of the invention is to arrange the elements-comprising the cooling device so that the cold air moving from the refrigerant chamber will pass through air circulating flues within, or adjacent to, the vertical walls of the car. Another object of the invention is to provide vertical air iiuesfiny an insulated side door corresponding with and functioning the same as the circulating air ues in the other part of the side walls. 'In such an arrangement the coldA service the air in the side wall and side door ilues is warmer than the air outside the car whichalso retards infiltration of air through Trains of refrigerator cars'hauling` the wall.

perishable commodities are moved as fast as sixty miles per hour which increases the infiltration of air through the walls and roof of the car. Also the fast movement of long and heavy trains, together with the severe shocks of switching, cause considerable racking and Weaving of the cars, causing leaky walls, and thus necessitating protection against air entering through the walls of the car.

Thev refrigerant being positionedbetween the lading compartment and the roof of the car constitutes an additional insulation for the upper part of the car so that the amount of insulation in the actual roof of the car may be reduced.

Another object of the invention is to drain the melted ice of a wet refrigerant into ducts within or adjacent to the vertical walls of thecar so as to further cool these vertical walls. The above mentioned air circulating fiues may be used for these drains. These ducts preferably extend to the outside of the car and are preferably provided with water seals.

Another object of the invention is to position the refrigerant containers (or refrigerant chambers) adjacent the roof of the car so as to increase the area of the floor space over the conventional car which has a refrigerant bunker lin each end of the car extending from the floor to the ceiling of the car, Without increasing the length or width of the car, and thereby increase the carrying capacity of the car. The conventional car can not .be loaded to within less than two feet from the ceiling on account of the high temperature of the atmosphere near the ceiling spoiling the commodity, whereas owing to the colder temperature of the air adjacent the ceiling of the lading compartment of a car of the type herein described and claimed, the lading may be piled very-close to the ceiling withoutdamage to the lading.

Another object of the invention is to attach the refrigerant containers to the car structure so that they can be removed and replaced independently of each other and without disturbing the roof of the car.

Another object is to provide a plurality of re= frigerant containers, preferably arranged in rows near the Aroof of the car and adjacent each of the side Walls, with each of said containers pro- `vided with means for loading it with a refrigerant independently of the other containers so that some of the containers may be filled with refrigerants, while the others remain empty or one end only of the car may be refrigerated. The refrigerant containers adjacent the doorways, Where the most heat leakage occurs, may be made deeper, wider or otherwise made to hold more refrigerant. In the above mentioned arrangements a more even distribution of the cold air may be provided.

Another object of the invention is to provide ,a frame work Within the car and to support; the

refrigerant containers to both such frame work peratures desired.

Another object isto provide a refrigerant container having separate compartments for the reception of water ice and dry ice and to arrange such container so that water ice and dry ice may be loaded through the same hatch to the respective compartments.

Another object is to provide means for stage cooling the air which circulates within a refrigerator car. In order to accomplish this, I Ycirculate the air first adjacent the relatively high temperature refrigerant, such as water ice and then adjacent the relatively low temperature refrigerant, such as dry ice. Such an arrangement results in meltage of the low priced water ice and in economy of the relatively high priced dry ice while, at' the same time, taking advantage of the low temperature of the dry ice. Another advantage is that the air is cooled to a very low temperature by the dry ice and at the same time is humidified by the water ice.

A still further object is to collect the melted Water ice and to interpose such melted ice between the dry ice compartment and the floor of circulating air. The relativelyc'old dry ice tends to freeze the melted water ice and the circulating air tends to maintain it in the melted state. Consequently, the water ice (either melted or frozen) interposed .between the dry ice and cir-- culating air acts as a medium of heat exchange between the dry ice and circulating air. The temperature of suoli medium tends to a moderate temperature intermediate the temperatures of the water ice and dry ice. Y l

Other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following detailed description by referring to the accompanying drawings.

In the. drawings:

Fig. l shows a typical cross section of a raliway refrigerator carincorporating my improved method of refrigerating the lading in the car and also showing methods of supporting and associating the refrigerant containers with the car structure, the containers including means to utllize dry ice. i

Fig. 2 is a cross section of upper part of the.

construction shown in Fig. 1 extending longitudinally of the car` A Fig. 3 is a 'plan of a railway refrigerator car showing the preferred arrangement of the refrigerant containers in the car.

Fig. 4 is a diagram showing the relative position of the refrigerant containers to the other parts of the car. r

Figs. 5, 6 and 7 show a modified construction wherein the refrigerant container is supported by members which do not interfere with the movement of air below the container.

Figs. 8 and 9 are views each similar to the upper part of Fig. 1 showing modified constructions.

My invention is adaptable to a refrigerator car having spa'ced apart insulated cari walls 2; an insulated roof 3; an insulated floor 4; a foraminous floor or oor rack above the insulated iioor and an air space S'between said floors.

A refrigerant container 8 is positioned near the.

roof 3 of the car and adjacent each of the side walls 2-2 of the car. These containers 8 are made with foraminous walls when wet ice or eutectic ice is used as a refrigerant; with solid walls when brine, or dry ice 'is used as a refrigerant,

partially solid and partially foraminous if desired; for instance,the foraminous part l0 may be used to hold wet icefor precooling the car and lading and the solid part Il may be used to` hold dry ice to provide refrigeration in transit. Each refrigerantvr container 8 Vis preferably spaced apart from the roof 3 of the carto provide anl air flue I3 therebetween and also preferably spaced apart from the adjacent side wall 2 of the car to provide an air flue I4 therebetween.

- arrangement the air-can completely surround the refrigerant container so that all six sidesform coolingareas for the circulating air. The refrigerant containers!! preferably have horizontal bottoms, as shown in Figs. 1 and 4,`to retain the refrigerant evenly distributed over the bottom to maintain a large lareabf contact` between the circulating air and the refrigerant.

An insulated partition 30 is preferably provided on the inside of each car side (and end) wall 2 and. spaced apart therefrom to provide a vertical wall flue 3| which communicateswith the airspace 6 below the foraminous floor 5 and also communicates with the air nues I3-l4 having contact with the refrigerant inthe refrigerant containers. These air ilues 3l are preferablyI separated into a plurality of vertical fiues soas to create a pull or draft from the refrigerant to the space below the foraminous floor. The 'vertical flue 3l is preferably lined on both sides with thinv sheets of metal which are preferably painted with brine resisting bituminous material. 'I'hese metallic sheets of metal protect the side wall 2 and partition 30 from moisture and rotting and also prevent innltration. I

An insulated partition Il! is provided below each K of the refrigerant containers 8 which preferably also form the floor of the refrigerant chamber. v

This insulated partition 40 is spaced apart from the refrigerant container so as to provide an air flue l I therebetween which communicates with the vertical air flue 3l near or in each side wall of the 'car and the vertical air ilues in the yside door. i

This partitionA Mis preferably inclineddownwardly and outwardly (see Figs. 1 and 4). so 'that they air cooled and densiiied by the refrigerant will move by gravity toward and into the vertical nues 3l. Each partition 40 preferably `comprises 'I'he insulated partition 4l) may comprise one -or more layers of'tongue and groove boards with insulation ltherebetween if desired.

The insulated partitions 40 on the opposite sides of the car are spaced apart to provide an air passageway 50 adjacent the longitudinal center of the car through which the warm air rises and moves into the refrigerant chamberson opposite sides of the car. The inclined partitions 40 direct the air warmed by the lading into and through this passageway 50.. The margins of the inclined partitions 40 adjacent the passageway 50may be provided with insulated members 52 .extending upwardly therefrom so as to further raise the bottom of the air entrance ports into the refrigerant chamber above the 'lower portion of the inclined partition 40 so as to cooperate with the inclined partition to directvthe movement of circulation of air. These upstanding members 52 will also serve as splash boards to prevent meltfed-ice or -,brine from splashing into .the lading compartment and willalsoserve to prevent ice,l from accidentally getting into .the lading compartment when theiefrigerant container is being filled. These members 52 are Vspaced away from the refrigerant container to provide flues 53. `'Ihe insulated partitionlUbelow the refrigerant container 8 and the insulated partition 30 between the side wall 2 and the lading compartment are associated to form a continuous uninterrupted insulation from the passageway 50 to the foraminous floor 5 and the air flue 4| below the refrigerant container 8` and the air flue 3| kbetween the insulated partition 30 and the side `wise to the car which moves theoretically independently of each other, but which in fact cooperate withV each other to balance the temperature of the air on opposite: sides of the lading compartment of the car. Thearrows show that the air warmed by the lading rises upwardly and is` guided by the inclined partition 40 into the passageway 5|) and coming in contact with the refrigerant in the refrigerant containers 8 is cooled and densiiied, and therefore moves down the inclined partitions 40 to the vertical car wall flues 3| through which it descends by gravity into the space 6 below the foraminous floor 5 fromv whence it'rises to replace the aforesaid warmed'air. The rising warmed air causes a pull on the cooled air in the side wall nues and also the gravity push of the cooled air in the side wall flues causes the warmed/air in the lading compartment to rise. Y

In the application of my invention to a refrigerator car, as shown in Figs. l, 2 and 3,the refrigerant container 8 for use with wet ice or Y eutectic ice as a refrigerant, comprises ametallic frame 50 .having foraminous walls provided by the use of a' netting, expandedmetal or perforated plate. yThis refrigerant container 8-is positioned below the hatch` opening l5 for filling and is preferably provided iwith an upstanding flange 6| which underlies a` flange of the hatch frame 62-to direct the iceinto the container. The upstanding flange 6| is preferably provided with inwardly deflected louversv 63 to allow air tc circulate over the refrigerant but these louvers are bent inwardly to direct ice or brine into the refrigerant container 8. Y When dry ice or brine is used as a refrigerant the refrigerant container will be provided with solid or non-perforated walls. shown having the part adjacent the side wall 2 with solid walls for use with dry-ice and the remaining portion I0 of the container with foraminouswalls for use with wet ice. Wet ice is frequently used to precol the car (and sometimes also the lading) while dry ice is frequently used to maintain the desired temperature while the car is in transit. y

The lower rafters 'l0 extend between and are supported by the opposite car side wall 2-2 and prferably each comprise an inverted channel section "having outwardly projecting lateral,

ers 8 restupon and are supported by these raft.

ers 10 insuch a manner-as to allow the containers to expand and contract as their temperature varies. In other words, the containers] are slidably supported by the supports '|2 and a stop 14 (see Fig. 2) or other means is positioned adjacent the ends of the containers to limit such expansive movement.

The upper arched rafters 15 are positioned adjacent the roof structure 3 and extend between and are supported by the car side walls 2--2 and the containers 8 are suspended from these upper rafters by the straps 16. In this arrangement the containers aresupported by both the upper and lower rafters.

The length of each container is less than the distance between the anges of adjacent lower rafters (see'Fig. 2), so that after part ofthe partition 40 has been removed a container 8 ping them out of the way.

Fig. 3 is'a plan view of the cars of`Figs. 1 and 2 and shows the relation of the refrigerant containers 5, hatch openings I5, spaces I1 between adjacenty containers and passageway 50.

The damper 95 is pivotally mounted upon the lower rafters 10 and is movable to vary the area of the passageway 50. The damper 95 is preferably controlled by thermostats positioned in the lading compartment.

I also preferably provide a door 96` slidably mounted (91) upon each of the upwardly projecting insulated members 52 to form a restrictable extension thereof so as to provide means to vary the amount of air flow from the passageway 50 to the refrigerant container adjacent one car wall, relative to the air flow from the passageway 50 to the refrigerant container adjacent the other car wall.

The end walls should be provided with insu- I lated flues as heretofore described for the side In Fig. 1, theA refrigerant container 8 is members nally extending timber |29, which yis'engaged Refrigerant containers |01 are positioned near the roof and adjacent to the side walls but are preferably provided with spaces or' iiues on vall six sides of each container as heretofore 'described. I preferably provide a plurality of containers |01 on each side of the car for simplicity of manufacture; installation and removal from the car and I also preferably provide spaces or air conduits |08 betweenV the ends of adjacent containersso that'the length of each container |01 is less than the distance between the adjacent rafters or less than the distances between the flanges '|0| of adjacent rafters. V

An insulated partition ||0 is spaced b'elow the containers |01 to form an air flue therebetween as heretofore described.

Angular frame members ||2 are provided having one arm ||3 supporting the floor or lower wall 4 of the container and the other arm ||5V extending upwardly adjacent one of the side walls of the container. These framemembers ||2 extend longitudinally of the car beyond the refrigerant container |01 and are attached'to the rafters |00 so as to support the refrigerant and the refrigerant container upon the rafters. The upstanding arnrA ||5 resists the inertia of the refrigerant whether such refrigerant is dry ice, wet ice or brine. The upper frame members 1 are just the length ofthe container.

Carrying members forY supporting the floor of the vcontainer between the opposite angular frame members ||2 extend'upwardly within the ucontainer and also resist the inertia of the refrigerant. '.ByY projecting the angular frame vmembers ||2 and carrying member |20 upwardly instead of downwardly they do not project into the ue and restrict the area thereof. By this arrangement the inside vertical height of the car may be increased, or putting it another way, the height of the car overall may be decreased.

'I'he lengthof the frame members ||2, preferably also vthe lengthof the carrying member |20, is less than the distances between the flanges |0| of adjacent rafters |00.and theends of the angular frame members 2 and carryby the meat hooks, is supported by ets upon theA meat Vrack 2.5.

.The refrigerator cars'disclosedin Figs. Sand 9 are similar to that disclosed in Fig. 1 except Vfor details of the structures. The side walls derive their principal'strength from the side posts |36, to which are secured the outerl(|38) and inner (|39) side plates.' .The outer` side plates |38 support the( roof |4I,v including the hatch frames |42, and the inner side Vplates |39 support the side ue structures |44 as `well as the carlines |45. The carlines V`|45 support thc refrigerant containers as well ,as the partitions 40 and the members 52. i

Inthe modification shown in Fig. 8, ther'rethe brackfrigerant containers each 'comprisea waterV icecompartment |5| provided by the integrally the brackets |03 and |04 respectively so Vthat when it is desired to remove the container |01 Y by lowering it the brackets |03 and |04 are moved lengthwise of the rafter whereupon the refrigerant container with the angular frame ||2 Vand carrying member |20 attached thereto may be lowered without disturbinglthe rafters.

A plurality ofl vertical columns |23 are positioned within each of the side vertical flues. These columns |23 are supported at their lower ends to the sub-structureof the lcar in any convenientV manner. The Vreirigarent containers are partially supported by these columns preferably by attaching the parts of the 4angular frame member ||2 outside of the 'refrigerant' The central part of the meat rack is supported by the link |26 which vis attached to the longitudinally extending beam |21 which in turn is supported by the rafters |00. The longitudi- Ij preferably support` these meat racks upon some1 of the columns |23.'

formed bottom |53, outer wall |54, and inner wall |56.and a dry ice' compartment |51 provided by thebottom |59, inner wail |56 and outer-wall |60. The common inner wallY |56'is preferabiy made of materiau having high heat conductivity vand the bottoms |53, |59 are preferablyinclined downwardly toward the inner wall |56 so that the respective Vrefrigerants` are thrust against the wall |56.4 Heat mayj then now from one refrigerant to anotherfand .there willV be a tendency,V to` equalize temperatures in the two compartments.

The container |50 is preferably provided-with tainer |50 and are attached at theirfends toV the `carlines |45. Overflow apertures-11| may be provided for overflow of meltedwater ice.

Air` in the lading chamber 36, being warmed by Y the lading, rises through the passageway 50 and then flows through the flues 4| vbetween the partitions 40 and containers |50. The refrigerant in the compartment |5| may be pure waterV ice at a temperature of 32 degrees or brine or eutectic ice ata temperature as lowas 6 degrees below zero. The air is cooled bythe bottom |53 and outer wall |54, not as low as :the temperature of Ythe refrigerant, butapproaching such temperature .the compartment |51 mayfcontain dry ice at a temperature as low as .109 degrees l d below zero and the air, asit continuesfthrough vthe flue 4|, is cooled substantially morethan' is possible by use of the refrigerant in compartment ward the lading vchamber `36.

In the modification shown inFig. 9, .the Vrefrigerant containers .|15 each comprise a water ice compartment |16 `and `a dry-ice compartment |18, the water icecompartment |16 having a por-f tion |19 which underlies the dry ice compartment |18.

liquid is cooled from abovepby the dry ice which has a tendency to freeze the liquid and is warmed `from the bottom by the circulating air.' The The portion |19 is in the lowest part of the i container |15 so that liquid formed-by meltagey Vof the water ice drains into'the'portion- |10. Sucha solid or liquid and the temperature may be lower than the temperature of the water ice and higher than the temperature of the dry ice. `'I'he second y stage of the refrigeration does not cool to as low a temperature as that heretofore described due to the insulation of portion` |19 andthe dry ice is 'therefore conserved. e Y

Details of thestructure of the car shown in Fig. 9 are similar 'in most respects to that shown in Fig. 8. f' The accompanying drawings illustrate the preferred formV of the invention, though itis to be understood that the invention is not limited to the exact details of construction shown and described, as it is obvious that variousv modifications thereof, within the scope of the claims, will occur to persons skilled in the art.

'I'his is acontinuation in part of my pending application filed Nov. 2, 193,8, Serial Number 238,441," which in turn is a division of my appli-Vv cation led Nov. 16, '1936, Serial Number 111,058

2,313,120 contents of the portion |19 may therefore be space, an airv inlet opening to said chamber remote from said last mentioned wall, means for which'matured into Patent No. 2,136,999 on Nov.

1. In combination with the walls, roof and floor of a refrigerator car, a hatch in'said roof, a re-v frigerant'container below said hatch and a subv stantially'vertical partition in said container below said hatch, whereby wet ice and dry ice may be loaded through said hatch into said container, the dry ice on one side and the wet ice on the other side of said partition, meanstodirect av flow of circulating air adjacent the bottom ofV said container, and means, interposed between saidV air and said dry ice, to collect liquidrby meltage of said wet ice.

2. -In combination with the walls, Vroof and'floor of a refrigerator car, a hatch in said roof, a refrigerant `container below said hatch, lmeans to divide said container 'into a dry ice compartment and a water ice compartment, and means to circulate airv first adjacent said wet ice compartment and then adjacent said dry ice compartment.

Y3.y In combination with the walls, roof and floor of a refrigerator car, a hatch in said roof, a refrigerant container below said hatch, means to divide said container into a dry ice compartment V and a water ice compartment, means forming an air nue adjacent the bottom of said container,

and means to induce an 'aircurrent in said ue adjacent 'said water ice and dry ice compartments respectively.

4. 4In lcombination with the walls, roof and floor of `a refrigerator car, a foraminous rackV larranged toV support the lading upon said floor s andprovide a space therebetween, a refrigerant chamber below the roof, aV container in said chamber, a flue associated with one of said walls for. conducting air from said chamber to said space, an air inlet opening to said chamber remote from said last mentioned wall, means for `loading dry ice lfinto a 'part i of said 'container l adjacent said wall and wetice into a part of said circulate air. first adjacent said water ice compartment, then adjacent said dry ice compartment, and then into said ue.v

5..In combination with the walls, roof and 1 'containerI remote from said wall, said dry ice and wet ice being rarranged in thermal conductive relation with eachother, and means to circulate airfirst -adjacent said water ice compartment, then adjacent said dry ice compartment, and then into said flue. A Y l 6. Two .stage refrigerating means for use in a refrigerator car-comprising a wet ice compartment and a dry ice compartment and means to direct a flow of circulating air first adjacent said wet ice compartment and then adjacent said dry ice compartment.

7. In-,a refrigerator car having walls, roof and floor which define a lading compartment, a refrigerant containerbelow the roof and above the lading compartment,` said container comprising a compartmentr adapted to contain a vrelatively warm refrigerant and a compartment adapted to contain a relatively cold refrigerant and means to direct a flow of circulating air first adjacent the first mentioned compartment, then adjacent the second mentioned compartment, and finally into said lading compartment.

8. Inja refrigerator car havingwalls, roof and fioorwhich define a lading compartment, a refrigerant container below the roof and above the lading compartment, 'said container comprising a compartment adapted to contain a relatively* warm refrigerant and a compartment adapted to contain a relatively cold refrigerant in heat transfer relation 'with said relatively warm refrigerant and means to direct a flow of circulat-v having a portion arranged to receive liquidA Y Aformed by meltage of said refrigerant, said first mentioned `compartment being disposed, at least partially, contiguous to said air and said portion` being interposed between said air and said second v mentioned compartment.

l0. In a refrigerator car, a container compris- Y ing a. compartment adapted to contain refrigerant formed of frozen liquid and a compartment adapted to contain dry ice, means to direct a flow of circulating air adjacent said container and means to collect liquid formed by meltage of said refrigerant, said last mentioned means being interposed between said air and said dry ice.

ll. In a refrigerator car of the overhead refrigerant Uype,` a single refrigerant container adapted to simultaneously containwater ice and dry ice inseparate compartments, and means container remote from'V said'wall, and means tow;

to circulate air first adjacent said water ice compartment and then adjacent said dry ice compartment.`

' 12. Refrigerating means for a refrigerator, in- A cluding a container, means to divide said container into a relatively cold refrigerant compartment and a relatively warm refrigerant compartment, said cold refrigerant compartment having solid` walls `and said warm.refrigerant compartment having foraminous walls. Y j

' 13.'v Two stage refrigerating means for use in a refrigerator car comprising a relatively cold refrigerant compartment and va. relatively warm refrigerant compartment, and means to direct a. flow of circulating air horizontally adjacent the bottoms of said compartments, rst adjacent one and then adjacent the other of said compartments.

14. Two stage refrigerating means for use in a refrigerator car comprising a relatively cold refrigerant compartment and a relatively Warm refrigerant compartment, and means v.to direct a flow of circulating air. rst adjacent one and then adjacent the other of said compartments.

CHARLES D. BONSALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2550935 *Feb 18, 1948May 1, 1951Pike Robert DMethod and system for refrigeration of railroad cars
US5660057 *Jul 30, 1996Aug 26, 1997Tyree, Jr.; LewisCarbon dioxide railroad car refrigeration system
US5979173 *Aug 22, 1997Nov 9, 1999Tyree; LewisDry ice rail car cooling system
US7703835Aug 11, 2006Apr 27, 2010Weeda Dewey JSecondary door and temperature control system and method
US20080036238 *Aug 11, 2006Feb 14, 2008Weeda Dewey JSecondary door and temperature control system and method
US20100270826 *Apr 14, 2010Oct 28, 2010Weeda Dewey JSecondary door and temperature control system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/332, 62/388, 62/431, 220/592.2, 62/424
International ClassificationB61D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D27/0081
European ClassificationB61D27/00D2