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Publication numberUS2313128 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1943
Filing dateNov 18, 1940
Priority dateNov 18, 1940
Publication numberUS 2313128 A, US 2313128A, US-A-2313128, US2313128 A, US2313128A
InventorsDensten Ulysses G
Original AssigneeStrong Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid control valve
US 2313128 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Marh,9,1943. 'QGBENSTEN 42,313,128-

FLUID CONTROL VALVE Filed Nov.A 1s, 1940 l A fromm Patented Mar. 9, 1943 FLUID coN'rRoi.' VALVE Ulysses G; Densten, Haddonllleights, N. J., as signor to` yStrong Manufacturing Company, Portland, Greg., a corporation-'of Oregon Application November 18, 1940,v Serial No.'366,096

5 Claims. (Cl. 25T-10) My invention relates toY luid control `valves and has for its particular object the'provision of a `valve of this character Vwhich is quick acting, but one which when seated quickly will not produce water hammer or surge which willtend to unseat the Valve element. A further object oi' my invention is to provide a Valve of this character which will not leak, and one in which the seal for the Valve is proportionate to the pressure of the fluid which it controls. A further object of my invention is to providea valve of this character which includes a valve element which may present a number of' diiferent surfaces to its seat and thus this valve element will not become gouged out or deformed due to repeated bearing at one point `on Vsaid valve.

These and other objects of my invention hereinafter pointed out are attained in a fluid control valve having a tubular body defining a transverse annular seat in its bore and a movable closure element adapted to be movedfintoand out of engagement with said seat. The closure element comprises a single stem the 4inner'end of which extends intothe body and carries -a spherical resilient valve elementA rotatably mounted on said stem, and the outer end of which carries a spring-pressed retaining member. Intermediate said ends Ais a semispherical pivot ele ment which engages a recessed seat in thebonnet of said valve, and a resilient sealing element surrounds said stem so that pressure exerted against said semispherical sealing element will tend to hold the latter in its seat to compress the sealing element and to prevent leakage therethrough.

The details of my invention and their mode of operation are hereinafter described with reference to the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of a faucet embodying my invention with portions broken away ,to show details of construction, in this view the valve is shown closed;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary section of saidsaine embodiment of my invention in which the `parts have been shown moved to open the valve, in said figure al1 of the parts of the valve surrounding the stem are shown in section;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the stem assembly;

Fig. 4 is a section through a modification of my invention with the valve element shown seat ed and dotted lines indicate the 'position to which the valve stem is moved to open the valve; and

Fig. 5 is a perspective View of the sealing element seated between the semispherical pivot element and its Yseat to prevent leakage .at this point.

' Ihavevillustrated myinvention as being embodiedin 'a rfaucet or bib-type valve as illustrated in Figs; 1 and 2. Said valve includes-a tubular body I having screw-threads for engaging a standard pipe sleeve. The neck la of said body is threaded, as at 3,- for engaging a removable bonnet Il. A sealing element or cupped washer 5 vis clamped between the top of said neck and withinsaid `bonnet and it can be compressed by the threaded connection between the bonnet and said neck. Said sealing elementor washer is preferablyvmade vof rubber or similar elastic materialand is'pierced as at 5a to -pass valveV stem l Abut to retain the semispherical pivot eleabout the center of curvatureof said pivot element 6 and thus may rotate vthrough a small angle. The provision of said sealingelement thus prevents leakage around said stem.

The underside of bonnet 4 isprovided with a curved recess 4a which corresponds generally in curvature'to the sweep of the pivot element 6 and the sealing element is formed to correspond to said sweep and -has an outstanding lateral flange 5b which may be gripped between the bonnet and the top of the'neck Ia. To accommodate the said angular movement ofthe valve stem; I cut away said bonnet at a relatively wide angle so that the bonnet will not interfere with the angular movement ofsaid stem. A coiled spring 8 -surrounding said stem and lies within the skirt of a retaining member 0r handle 9 which tends ltoy hold said pivot element tightly in `position in therounded seat and to compress the sealing element therein. The compression of said .spring maybe varied by screw-threading the'hand-le 9 onto the threaded end 'Ia of said stem.V Likewise, the-partsrassembled on said stem but removable therefrom can be detached-by unscrewing said handle from said fitted portion laito'permit themv to. be removed. Inasmuch as said stem 'I is permitted to rotate about a longitudinalv axis with respect to the body, I interposea cap I0 Vbetween thebonnet and the retainingmember v9. Said cap is journalled upon an upstanding ange I2 formed upon the bonnet. I alsoprovide a cupped disc I I on the inner end ofthe handle .9 sothat said disc and handle together formi said.v retaining. member and vhouse the spring` 8- therein. The skirted portion I3 of said handle is' counter-bored to a larger diameter than the` threaded lportion for engaging.

the end 'la of the stem and it is within said counter-bored portion of said skirted flange I3 that the spring 8 is housed.

The upper surface of the cap I is provided with one or more cam faces I4. In the embodiment shown in Fig. 1 the valve is adapted to move only from a vertical position as shown in Fig. 2 to an angular or sloping position shown in Fig. 1 to move from open to close position. Thus only one cam face I4 is necessary and said cam face is slotted as at Ma to limit said movement. The upper portion of said cap is attened as at I5 so that the stem may be held in the position it is shown to occupy in Fig.,2. That. i is, the under surface of the disc' Il beingflat and the cam face I5 being flat and varranged perpendicular to the stem causes the stem to remain in position when two said fiat surfaces' are opposed. When the stem is tipped, however, in a counter-clockwise direction as the parts are indicated in Fig."2, it Willmovel' to fully closed position, as is shown in Fig. l, because of the engagement of said disc I I with the cam face IIS.l Inasmuch as uid being controlled tends to move the spherical Valve element I6 towards its seat I'I, I preferably makethe compression on said spring 8 quite heavy so that the engagement of the disc on the fiat face I5 will be sufficient 'to hold the valve open'even in the presence of a large quantity of iiuids flowing rapidly against and -around the sphericalvalve element |,5 i.. Y `The valve element I6 is preferably journalled upon the reduced portion 'Ib of the stem and a head 'lc at the extreme end ofsaid-'stem holds-said valve element inplace. -I preferablyV make said valve element I6 of rubber or some similar elastic material. If rubber would tendto become deteriorated by the uid being handled, I preferably use some equivalent material such, for example, as the compound sold under the trade name neoprene. This is likewise true of the sealing element 5 which wouldbe attackediby the same type of fluid. f

`I deem it quite important that said' valve'element be made of some elastic material andpreferably I form said valve elementftohave a consistency comparable in elasticityto the banks on the sides of pool andbilliard tables. AThis is for the reason that, witha valve element of 'this' character, I have found thati't tends to eliminate water hammer. In a water pipe, for example, these violent vibrations are somewhat difiicult of analysis having todo withthev mass of water or other liquids being directed through a conduit, and with the elasticity of the pipe 'and iittings. A' pre-disposing factor usually encountered is a loose valve stem, the water hammer starting wheen the Valve is open and continuing asI the valve stemivibrates. I have found 'that the valve embodying my invention '-"having Vthe valve element of such elasticity as has" been d'e' scribed does not produce water hammer even after the valve is worn. This result seemingly can be attributed to two factors. First, the material of which said valve elementv is made yields so readily that the naturalpriod of the vibrations is lengthened to such an extent that .they

are damped out by the rest" ofthe system, second,` the rubber itself v'-'fserves as a damping agent.V When VI speak of rubber I, 'of c ourse, r`e f er to any similar material which may be utilized for said valve element. `The stem I'n'raybe-ro-v tated about a longitudinalaxis andsaid rotation cio would move the valve element' so that-different 75 surfaces of the valve element would be brought into contact with the valve seat I 1. Because of the fact that said valve element is rotatable upon the stem it also tends to permit said sphere to move slightly even though the stem is not rotated to present new faces of the valve element to its seat. This change in position of the valve element tends to produce equal wear about its periphery and thus the valve has a long operating life. It also tends to prevent the formation vof ridges or grooves in the valve element which tend to permit leakage when the valve is permitted to stand in one position for a long time and then is changed to a new position. Also because Aof the yieldability. of said Valve element, it tends to conform to` theshape of the seat even though the valve element does become distorted either by pressure 'or by wear.

When it becomes necessary to open up said valve, this may be accomplished by unscrewing the bonnet 4 from its threaded connection 3 whereupon the entire valve stem assembly, bonnet and cap may be lifted out. Likewise the sealing element 5 can be replaced by unscrewing the handle 9' andthe valve element I5 can be replaced merely by slipping the rubber member off over the head 'Ic and from off the narrow portion Tb, the material-of which said valve element is made being sufficiently yieldable and resilient to laccommodate removal and replacement.

In Fig.` 4 I illustrate a slightly different type of valve structure, the tubular body being illustrated as' having two threaded pipe connections, |80. andlb. The threaded inlet connection is I8a and threaded outlet connection is Ib. In said modification I illustrate how a valve of this characterlcan' be arranged so that the stem assembly can move in two directions from vertical to open and close the valve."Tothis end the'slot I4b in cap I4 in said modicationis slotted. an equal distance beyond the iiattened surface I5 rather than only to one side thereof as is shown in the first embodiment. Thus the valve stem assembly can move from the position shown in full lines to the position shown in dotted lines as is shown in said Fig.l 4.1 Otherwise said modication is identical to that shown in previous figures and similar letters of reference are given to the parts thereof. i

-I--I'claimz 1.' A fluid control valve having a tubular body deiiningatransverse annular seat about its bore, a movable closure element adapted to be moved into and out of engagement with said seat, said closure element comprising a stem, the inner end of which extends into said body, and the outer end of which lies exteriorly thereof, a spherical valve element mounted upon the inner end of said stem, a spring-pressed retaining member carried by the outer end of said stem and a semispherical pivot element arranged intermediate the ends of said stem, a removable bonnet for saidbody defining an aperture leading laterally from the bore of said body, through which aperture'said stem passes, a rounded seat surrounding the inner face of said yaperture for accommo' a movable closure element adapted to be moved into and out of engagement with said seat, said closure element comprising a stem, the inner end of which extends into said body, and the outer end of which lies exteriorly thereof, a spherical valve element mounted upon the inner end of said stem, a spring-pressed retaining member carried by the outer end of said stem and a semispherical pivot element arranged intermediate the ends of said stem, a removable bonnet for said body defining an aperture leading laterally from the bore of said body, through which aperture said stem passes, a rounded seat surrounding the inner face of said aperture for accommodating said pivot element, an elastic sealing element secured across said rounded seat, pierced t pass said stem but to retain said pivot element, said sealing element lying between said pivot element and said rounded seat, a cap engaging said bonnet, said sealing element being secured between said bonnet and said body, a cam face eccentric to the semispherical pivot element formed adjacent said aperture and upon said cap in operative engagement With said retaining member, and a Way of limited length formed in said cap through which said stem extends to limit the pivotal movement of said stem with respect to said cam face.

3. A fluid control valve having a tubular body defining a transverse annular seat about its bore, a pivotally mounted closure element adapted for engagement with said seat, said closure element being removably secured to said body and being retractable as a single unit therefrom, said closure element comprising a stem, the inner end of which extends into said body, and the outer end of which lies exteriorly thereof, a spherical valve element mounted directly upon the inner end of said stern, a spring-pressed retaining member carried by the outer end of said stem and a pivot element fixed to said stem and arranged intermediate the ends thereof and having a sealed ball-and-socket bearing with said retaining member, and said stem being journalled for free rotation in said retaining member.

4. A fluid control valve having a tubular body dening a transverse annular seat about its bore,

va pivotally mounted closure element adapted for engagement with said seat, said closure element being screw-fitted to said body and being retractable as a single unit therefrom, said closure element comprising a stem, the inner end of which extends into said body, and the outer end of Which lies exteriorly thereof, a spherical valve element journalled for free rotation upon the inner end of said stem, a spring-pressed retaining member carried by the outer end of said stem and a pivot element fixed to said stem and arranged intermediate the ends thereof and having a sealed ball-and-socket bearing with said retaining member.

5. A uid control valve having a tubular body defining a transverse annular seat about its bore, a pivotally mounted closure element adapted for engagement With said seat, said closure element being screw-fitted to said body and being retractable as a single unit therefrom, said closure element comprising a stem, the inner end of which extends into said body, and the outer end of Which lies exteriorly thereof, a spherical valve element journalled for free rotation upon the inner end of said stem, a spring-pressed retaining member carried by the outer end of said stem and a pivot element fixed to said stem and arranged intermediate the ends thereof and having a sealed ball-and-socket bearing with said retaining member, said stem being journalled for free rotation in said retaining member, and said spherical valve element and said seat having substantial resilient engagement and accommodation one with the other.

ULYSSES G. DENSTEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2707981 *Jun 16, 1950May 10, 1955Earle E CroweCitrus fruit juice extractor
US2757688 *Aug 4, 1953Aug 7, 1956Klingler Karl ATwo-way valve
US2809800 *Dec 29, 1954Oct 15, 1957Produktionsmateriel AbValve mechanism for nozzles or similar tubular members
US2852225 *Jun 4, 1954Sep 16, 1958Klingler Karl ASelf-sealing valve construction
US2867123 *Mar 8, 1956Jan 6, 1959Mcdonnell & Miller IncSealing means
US2872152 *Mar 22, 1954Feb 3, 1959 budwig
US2885117 *Apr 8, 1954May 5, 1959Sylvania Electric ProdMica feed apparatus
US3685794 *Apr 23, 1971Aug 22, 1972Autotrol CorpFlapper valve assembly
US5314164 *Jul 17, 1992May 24, 1994Mks Instruments, Inc.Pivotal diaphragm, flow control valve
US5549135 *Aug 30, 1995Aug 27, 1996Taimei Kinzoku Kogyo Co., Ltd.Ball Valve
US5660207 *Dec 29, 1994Aug 26, 1997Tylan General, Inc.Fluid flow meter
US5765283 *Jul 23, 1996Jun 16, 1998Millipore CorporationMethod of making a flow controller
US5850850 *Jul 23, 1996Dec 22, 1998Millipore CorporationFlow controller, parts of flow controller, and related method
US5901741 *Nov 20, 1995May 11, 1999Millipore CorporationFlow controller, parts of flow controller, and related method
US8123196 *Oct 7, 2009Feb 28, 2012Chernoff Larry JIntegrated valve system
US8763986 *Feb 9, 2012Jul 1, 2014Kwc AgSanitary fitting having a covering element for protecting a control cartridge
US20120204344 *Feb 9, 2012Aug 16, 2012Kwc AgSanitary fitting having a covering element for protecting a control cartridge
DE1122335B *May 16, 1958Jan 18, 1962Paul BockAbsperrventil, insbesondere fuer WC-Spueleinrichtungen
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/215, 251/235, 74/18.1, 251/335.1
International ClassificationF16K1/14, F16K1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16K1/14
European ClassificationF16K1/14