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Publication numberUS2314332 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1943
Filing dateJun 10, 1936
Priority dateJun 10, 1936
Publication numberUS 2314332 A, US 2314332A, US-A-2314332, US2314332 A, US2314332A
InventorsFerris Donald K
Original AssigneeFerris Donald K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for washing articles
US 2314332 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, 1943. FERRls 2,314,332

APPARATUS FORWWASHING ARTICLES Filed June 10, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Y Q Li 41's ATTORNEY-3 D. K. FERRIS 2,314,332

APPARATUS FOR WASHING ARTICLES Fil' ed June 10, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 K BY W2 W 1 11 I 1/ I I 1 I I 1 I 1/ 1 I, ,z I

March 23, 1943.

ATTORNEYS March 23, 1943.- D. K. FERRIS APPARATUS FOR WASHING ARTICLES Filed June 10, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 BY Q fig ZZSATTORNEYS March 23, 1943. D. K. FERRIS 2,314,332

APPARATUS FOR WASHING ARTICLES Filed June 10, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 k s. ia. L s. a

INVENTOR.

' %z's ATTORNEY.

March 23, 1943. K FERRls APPARATUS FOR WASHING ARTICLES 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 10, 1936 ZmAO l B590 2255 'l ZumO NAN Z0 NOPOE dub-(3 For. rlu I55 g ll mm 2. m wwzimfivl zimai OMWOJU Patented Mar. 23, 1943 I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE APPARATUS FOR WASHING ARTICLES Donald K. Ferris, Geneva, N. Y.

Application June 10, 1936, Serial N0. 84,504

27 Claims.

' other articles and including an improved arrangement of electrical devices for heating and controlling the flow of the washing and rinsing fluid.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved liquid heating unit embodying a container or receptacle for the liquid having electric heating means for generating steam and means by which to control and employ the steam to vary the level of the liquid and to control and effect discharge of the liquid from the unit.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved arrangement of electric heating and circuit controlling devices within the liquid holding receptacles under the control of the liquid and adapted to operate or function in a predetermined timed relation to insure delivery of the heated washing and rinsing supplies of water to the washing chamber at proper intervals and at the desired temperatures.

A further object of the invention is to provide in a machine of the class described, a washin chamber and individual compartments for supplying pre-washing, washing, and rinsing liquids thereto with electrical devices for generating steam in the compartments containing the washing and rinsing liquids to efiect discharge of the liquid therefrom at predetermined intervals,

and in which apparatus electrical devices are also provided for circulating the liquid within the washing chamber and for controlling the drain passage leading therefrom, said electrical devices operating automatically in a predetermined sequence to successfully complete the required operations. I I

A further object of th invention is to provide receptacles in which to heat the washing and rinsing liquids and one or more heating devices in each of the receptacles for heating the liquid as well as for the purpose of generating steam to provide pressure within the receptacles sufllcient to effect discharge of the liquid to the washing chamber and also to provide means for varying the position of the heating device or devices relative to the level of the'liquid in order to be able to vary the period required to effect the discharge of the liquid from each receptacle, and to make it possible to be able to better control the intervals of discharge of the liquid from the several receptacles and the temperature at which the liquid is supplied to the washing chamber.

To these and other ends the invention resides in certain improvements and combinations of parts, all as will be hereinafter more fully described, the novel features being pointed out in the claims at the end of the specification.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a sectional elevation of a washing machine embodying one form of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional elevation on line 22 of Fig. 3;

i .3 is a front elevation as viewed from the right of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional plan taken substantially on line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional elevation through the receptacle containing the rinse water;

Fig. 6 is a plan viewillustrating the manner of constructing the switch and heating units for controlling and heating the liquid;

Fig. 7 is a sectional elevation on line 1-1 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged sectional elevation on line H of Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is a top plan view of a slightly modified form of heating unit;

Fig. 10 is a sectional elevation taken on line |llll of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary sectional elevation illustrating the latch mechanism for securing the cover for the washing chamber in closed position with the magnet for releasing the latch shown in normal deenergized position;

Fig. 12 is a similar view showing the armature of the magnet in position to effect release of the latch when the armature becomes deenergized.

Fig. 13 is a part sectional elevation illustrating the drain for the dish washing chamber and associated parts;

Fig. 14 is a similar view showing the drain valve in closed position Fig. 15 is a diagrammatic view showing the electrical devices and the circuit connections therefor;

Fig. 16 is a plan view of one of the hinges for raising the cover of the machine when the latching means therefor is released;

Fig. 17 is a transverse sectional elevation through the hinge shown in Fig. 16;

Fig. 18 is a view in elevation of a modified form of the invention, and

Fig. 19 is a sectional elevation of another modification.

Fig. 20 is a diagrammatic representation of a portion of the machine.

The same reference numerals throughout the several views indicate the same parts.

The present invention embodies generally, liquid heating apparatus in which steam is generated in a receptacle containing the liquid by means of a suitable heating device such, for example, as an electric heater of any preferred type. The steam is collected and controlled in such a manner as to exert pressure on the liquid sufficient to force it downwardly through a suitable outlet or to raise it to a predetermined level for discharge from the receptacle at a point above the normal level of the liquid. A siphon is preferably employed for withdrawing the heated liquid from the receptacle for discharge to any de sired point when raising the level of the liquid, as distinguished from forcing it downwardly within the receptacle. The siphon will begin operation after the water has reached the boiling point and sufllcient steam has been generated to exert pressure on the liquid to raise it to the required level.

When the apparatus is to be used for heating water for dish washing purposes it can be directly associated with a dish washing machine of any suitable design, such, for example, as that shown in Fig. 1. In this case three receptacles are employed for receiving the pre-wash, the wash, and the rinsing water, respectively, the pre-wash water being discharged directly to the dish-washing chamber. The electric heating and circuit control devices within the receptacles containing the washing and rinsing water are so designed and relates as to function or operate in a predetermined sequence whereby to eflect heating and delivery of the washing and rinsing water to the dish washing chamber at predetermined intervals, the rinsing water being delivered thereto as soon as the main supply of wash water has been discharged therefrom. In other words, the apparatus is so designed that it is only necessary to place the dishes and a suitable detergent within the washing chamber and the water within the diiferent receptacles provided, the operations thereafter being automatic, the motor circuit being closed by the water to start the motor for driving the impeller whereby to circulate the water within the dish washing chamber. Furthermore, the drain valve for controlling the discharge of the waste water is automatically opened and closed at proper intervals and the latch for maintaining the cover for the dish washing chamber in closed position is automatically released to allow the cover to swing to open position as soon as the final rinsing operation is completed.

Referring to the drawings, Ill represents the outer casing of the machine having top and bottom frame members II and II, respectively, to which the side walls of the casing are attached, the frame member il carrying the end wall lid of the receptacle. Suitably supported within the casing is the washing machine proper, designated generally by the reference numeral l3 and comprising a container having a washing chamber it into which extends an impeller I! for circulating and discharging the washing fluid in contact with the dishes it supported by any suitable means, such as the rack II shown in Fig. 1.

The impeller is mounted on the shaft of an electric motor [8, suitably connected with the lower end of the container It. The container has a drain pipe I! extending therefrom which is provided at its outer end with a valve ll for closing the outlet II, the valve being normally held in open position by a spring 22 and closed by an electro-magnet 23 included in the motor circuit and operated as described hereinafter.

Surrounding the drain pipe I! is a heating coil 24 for warming the water contained within the pipe, the coil being in the form of an adjustable resistance for controlling or regulating the flow of the current, as more fully described hereinafter.

Disposed within the casing II is a tank 25 for receiving the waste water discharging from the drain pipe when the valve 2| is opened, the tank being removably supported On guides 26 suitably connected with and supported by the casing ll.

Separate tanks or receptacles are provided for the pre-wash, wash, and rinsing water, these being designated'by reference numerals 21, II, and 2!, respectively, the receptacle 2! having a small compartment Ill disposed therebeneath through which the rinse water is by-passed on its way to the washing chamber for a purpose described hereinafter. The receptacles or compartments 21 to Ill, inclusive, are preferably formed of metal and may, if desired, be constructed as a unit and secured to the front, rear and end walls ll, 32, and II, respectively, which are disposed within the casing II and formed of suitable insulating material.

A measuring tank or receptacle I4 is provided for measuring the water to be delivered to the compartments 21, 28, and 2!, said receptacle being supported for a swinging movement from the horizontal position shown in Fig. 2 to the vertical position shown in Figs. 1 and 5 by a plurality of hinges Ii which connect the tank with the front wall of the casing I II. The measuring tank has three compartments 21a, Ila, and 20a for measuring the pre-wash, the wash and the rinsing liquids for discharge respectively to the receptacles 21, Z8, and 2! upon swinging the measuring receptacle from the horizontal position shown in Fig. 2 to the vertical position shown in Fig. 1.

The water level of the measuring receptacle is indicated at I, an overflow passage 31 being provided in insure proper measurement of the water by the several compartments of the receptacle. The adjacent side walls of the liquid measuring compartments are provided with openings 38 for the passage of the liquid from one measuring compartment to another, whereby the receptacle may be filled by discharging the liquid to either of said compartments, said adjacent walls being spaced apart at their inner ends to provide openings II to afford clearance for the side walls of the receptacle 2! as shown in Fig. 4.

The measuring receptacle is provided with a suitable lock or latch ll for cooperation with a keeper 4| on the casing II to secure the receptacle in the normal position shown in Fig. 1. The latch is provided with a lever 42 for releasing the same which may be employed to swing the receptacle to and from normal position. The measuring receptacle is provided at its opposite ends with stop lugs ll for engaging the inner face of the front wall of the casing to hold the receptacle in the horizontal position shown in Fig. 2.

The pre-wash water discharged from the messuring compartment 21a into the receptacle :1 will flow immediately from the latter through a digcharge conduit 44 which is extended into the washing chamber 14 and so positioned as to discharge the liquid in contact with the blades of the impeller ii for proper distribution or circulation by the latter.

As previously stated, the wash and rinsing water will, upon swinging the measuring receptacle from the position shown in Fig. 2 to that shown in Fig. 1, be discharged into the tanks or receptacles 28 and 29, respectively, to fill the same substantially to the level indicated at 45a in Fig. 5. The receptacles 28 and 29 constitute heatin compartments for the main supply of wash water and the rinse water, respectively, each being provided with heating means described hereinafter.

Disposed within th heating compartment 28 is an inverted container 28b and mounted within the heating compartment 29 is a similar container 29b. The air trapped within the container 28b by the liquid delivered to the heating receptacle 29 will be forced out by the liquid through a vent pipe 45 extending upwardly within the easing i8 and terminating in a supporting plate 48, Figs. 2 and 3. A similar vent pipe 4'! extends from the inverted container 29b to the supporting plate 48 for carrying off the air trapped in said container by the liquid entering the same.

The open ends of the vent pipes are closed by a strip of rubber 49 or other suitable material secured upon the side walls of the measuring compartment 21a at the outer ends thereof as shown in Fig. 4, said member moving into engagement with the supporting plate 48 after the air has escaped from the inverted container 28b and 29b. J

The receptacles 28 and 29 are each provided with electric heating devices described hereinafter, for heating the liquid to generate steam, the heating devices being so disposed with respect to the inverted containers as to cause the steam to collect within the upper ends of the containers for the purpose of exerting pressure on the liquid suillcient to force it from the containers, thus causing the liquid to be raised to a predetermined level within each of the receptacles at which level it will flow therefrom through a suitable outlet provided for the purpose.

Preferably means is provided for siphoning the liquid from the heating chambers when it reaches a certain predetermined level therein. To this tend the receptacle 28 is provided with a siphon tube 58 the shorter leg of which is extended withuid lying between the spaced blades or contacts of the heater serves to complete the circuit. This is true also of the switches 88 and 5'! in the upper and lower portions of the container 29b as well as of the switches 58 and 59 in the liquid receiving compartment 38.

The switch and heater construction is shown in Fig. 6, in which the supporting plate 6| has a plurality of laterally extending spaced blades bla lying between the bla s 62a of the supporting plate 82. The blades a e held in spaced relation and are insulated one from another by the parts 83, formed of rubber or other suitable insulating material, said parts in certain of the switch and heater units being projected below the blades as shown in Fig. 8 to form supporting means for the units. The number of the blades of any particular switch or heater unit may be varied to vary the capacity of the unit as desired. Furthermore, the size of the blades and the distance between the same may also be varied to regulate or control the capacity of the heater. It is found desirable to place certain of the heater and switch units within small liquid holding containers for maintaining one or more closed circuits after the main supplies of liquid have been discharged from the heating receptacles to the dish washing chamber.

Two of such containers are indicated at 64 in Fig. 3, one adjacent the bottom of the liquid heating receptacle 29 for supporting the heater and switch unit 51 and another in the compartment 38 for supporting the switch units 58 and 59. The construction of the container 64 is best shown in Figs. '1 and 8, in which the blade insulating parts 83 are shown resting on the bottom of the container. The containers 84 are necessary at the points indicated in order to maintain a closed circuit when the rinse water in the compartment 29 is below a predetermined level, as'

for example when practically all of the supply of rinse water has been discharged to the dish washing chamber, at which time it is desired to prevent opening of the closure.l3a for the washing chamber and to keep the motor running whereby to operate the impeller to complete the rinsing operation. Under these conditions of operation the liquid within the receptacles 84 will be, sumcient to maintain the motor circuit closed for the desired length of time and the electro-magnets 23 and 88 energized to prevent opening of the drain valve and release of the latch for the clo- I in the receptacle substantially to the bottom ff thereof, the longer leg being connected with the '"pipe' 44 leading to the dish washing chamber as shownln Fig. 1.

Asimilar siphon tube 5| has its shorter leg disposed within the receptacle 29 containing the 'rin'se water, but in this case the longer leg of the tube isbent at its lower end and extended within the small liquid receiving compartment 38 imjmediately below the receptacle 29, the liquid beingdischarged to said compartment for a purpose described hereinafter. The compartment 38 is connected with the liquid discharge pipe 44 by ;a short pipe 52, as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 3. The means for heating the washing and rinsing water in the receptacles 28 and 29 preferably comprises multiple surface immersion heaters of the grid type, one of which is shown at 53 in the sure Ho. The discharge end of the siphon Si is directed towards the container 64 in the compartment 38, so that the siphon fills the container 84 before any substantial amount of liquid is discharged through the discharge pipe 52. With the present arrangement the main supply of wash water delivered to the receptacle 28 is about half of the amount of rinse water delivered to the receptacle 29. Since the rinse water is not needed until after the supply of wash water has been exhausted, it is necessary to so proportion the size or capacity of the heaters in the receptacles 28 and 29 as to insure proper timing of the same whereby to start siphoning of the rinse wa ter for discharge to the dish washing chamber as soon as the main washing operation is completed.

The timing operations can be controlled in different ways, as for example by the use of the modified form of heating unit shown in Figs. 9

and 10 in which the heater is mounted on a suitable-support 6" which may constitute the bottom wall of the liquid holding receptacle or be in the form of a container similar to that shown at 84 in Figs. 7 and 8. The modified heater except for the means for controlling its capacity, is of the same construction as the one shown in Fig. 6, and has therefore been given the same reference characters.

The current draw of the heaters in water of any given conductivity depends on the area of the active surfaces of the heater, the distance between the same, and the temperature of the water between said surfaces. It has been found that the conductivity of water increases rapidly with an increase of the temperature and this is an important factor in determining the current draw. If a thin strip of insulation is placed between the active surfaces of two of the heater leaves, the current will be forced to travel around the edges of the strip in order to reach the opposite leaf. In doing so it will travel for a part of the way through water of a lower temperature than that through which it would travel if the strip of insulation were not used. Thus the current will be reduced since its path of travel is increased through water the conductivity of which is decreased. By inserting a variable number of strips of insulation between the leaves of the heater or the switch the current can be limited as desired. An example of this method of current control is illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10 in which two relatively long and short strips 66 and 61 of insulating material are shown between certain of the leaves of the heater.

A screen Ila is provided in the bottom of the washing chamber Il which is spaced from and opposite the inlet end of the drain pipe I I as shown in Fig. 1. The screen forms a pocket between the impeller and the conduit open at one side at the top which is provided for the purpose of trapping food particles released by the washing or cleansing operations, which if allowed to remain in the water would tend to collect on and adhere to the dishes after completing the rinsing operation. Such particles are of course kept in circulation by the action of the impeller, buttend to gravitate toward the bottom of the dish washing chamber. During the course of the agitation of liquid by impeller IS, the food particles tend to be trapped on the right hand side of screen Ila, so that after a comparatively short time substantially all of the particles find their way to the right hand side of screen Ila where they are trapped, later to be discharged through the discharge valve when it is opened. This construction collects practically all of the food particles on the right hand side; but if any remain on the left hand side they are of such small quantity as to be negligible.

The closure I3a for the dish holding container I3 is hingedly connected with the inwardly ex tending portion Ila of the end wall I I of the cas-. ing III by means of a suitable number of hinges. one of which is indicated at I in Figs. 16 and 17. These hinges are of a well known typ and each embodies a torsion spring N, the spring operating to raise the closure substantially to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 1 when the latch for the closure is released, upon completion of the rinsing operation, by the solenoid or elecmagnet ID. The latch is held in latching position when the door is closed by a spring H. The latch has a pivoted dog II thereon which is swung outwardly by the lug II on the armature II of the magnet when the latter is energized, at which time the armature is moved from the position shown in Fig. 11 to that shown in Fig. 12. The magnet is deenergized by the opening of the switch it at which time the spring I! will return the armature to the position shown in Fig. 11. When this is done, the lug ll, through engagement with the dog ll, will trip the latch and release the cover for movement by the springs II of the hinges ll to the dotted line position shown in Fig. l. The latch many be manually released when desired, by moving the releasing member II from the position shown in Fig. 11 in a direction toward the latch to swing the latter upon the arm II against the resistance of the spring ll.

In the control of the temperature of the water. it has been found that the current flowing through the blades of the heater and the water therebetween effects a rather rapid generation of steam. It will be obvious of course that the nearer the bottom of the receptacle the heater is placed the longer it will take to collect sumcient steam in the upper end of the inverted container to force the water therefrom due to the fact that a greater quantity of steam must be condensed before the temperature of the water can be raised to a point at which the steam will be given of! at the level of the liquid. In other words, if the heater is placed adjacent or even with the surface of the water, the steam generated by the heater will be quickly liberated since the amount of water to be. heated before the steam. will begin to escape will be relatively small compared to the quantity to be heated when the heating unit is placed in the bottom of the receptacle.

It will be seen therefore that if the heater is made adjustable for movement up and down within the receptacle, that the time required to accumulate sufficient steam above the level of the liquid in the inverted container to raise the liquid to a level within the receptacle at which it will start operation of the siphon can be controlled and varied as desired. To this end the heater 53 in the receptacle 2. is provided with supporting parts II which are apertured to receive the upstanding threaded rods 82 fixed upon the bottom of the receptacle. The rods are provided with nuts .3 adjustable thereon to raise or lower the supports II to position the heater it at the desired level within the receptacle.

The modification'shown in Fig. 18 embodies a single unitaryheating device which can be used for heating liquids for various purposes, said unit being adapted for use in laboratories, bath rooms or wherever it may be desired to provide for a relatively quick supply of hot water or other tro-magnet supported by a bracket "a, de-' 7 pending within the casing III from the end wallintermediate its ends upon an arm I3 carried by the brackets "a for supporting the electroliquid. This device comprises a receptacle Ila having a hinged cover 32a, the receptacle being provided with an inverted container 334 from which extends a vent pipe Ila having its upper end terminating in a support Na and closed by the cover 32a after the receptacle has been filled with liquid'to a predetermined level as indicated for example at "a.

A multiplesurface heater of the type shown for example at 53 in Fig. 3 is disposed within the receptacle, the heater and the parts for raising and lowering it within the receptacle being the same as shown in Fig. 2, have been given fat-j 2,819,832

the same reference numerals. The adjustable strips of insulation 99 and 91 shown in Figs. 9 and 10 are also shown in Fig. 18, being provided for, the same purpose in both cases.

A si min tube 500- .has its short leg disposed within the receptacle 3 la. the longer leg of which can be adapted for discharging thehot water or liquid to any desired point. When the liquid is delivered to the receptacle it will rise within the inverted container 99a, and cause the air to escape through the vent pipe 34a, which however will be closed by the cover 324 when the latter is moved to closed position, whereby to prevent the escape of steam from the inverted container.

The multiple surface heater 53 will serve both as a means for heating the liquid and for closing the circuit, the circuit connections not being shown. However, if preferred, a switch corresponding to the switch 51 of Figure 3 can be placed within the receptacle for controlling the circuit if found advisable. Furthermore, an additional heater can be positioned within the receptacle above the one shown, corresponding to the heater 54 shown in Fig. 3, to increase the temperature of the liquid if desired. It will be understood that the modified heating device is entirely automatic, the only operation required being that of placing the required amount of liquid within the receptacle.

In order to start the machine the measurin tank 34 is filled and the contents of receptacles 21a, 29a, and 29:: thereof discharged into the receptacles 21, 29, and 29, respectively. The prewash water received by the intermediate receptacle 21 will begin immediately to discharge through the supply pipe '44 to the washing chamber H. The switch 51 in the receptacle 29 being immersed within the liquid, will close the motor circuit, current flowing through the conductor 95, switch 51, conductor 95, motor l9, and back through conductor 91. Current will also flow through resistance 24, heaters 53 and 55 in receptacles 28 and 29 respectively.

As soon as the water reaches a predetermined level in the inverted container 291), the upper switch 59 therein will be closed, current flowing through conductors 95 and 98, switch 59, conductors 99 and 99, electro-magnet 23 and conductors 9i and 91, thus energizing the magnet to eiIect closing of the drain valve 29 to retain the prewash water in the washing chamber M. This water serves to dissolve the soap or washing compound, and being cooled by the walls of the washing chamber will soften the particles of food adhering to the dishes, such for example as egg, flour and other material which might become baked on the dishes if hot water were first used within the washing chamber.

As soon as steamis generated within the receptacle 28, it will collect in the upper portion of the inverted container 29? and will then begin to force the water from the container whereby to raise the level within the receptacle 29 to a point at which to start operation of the siphon 59, which will deliver the main body of washing water to the supply conduit 44 for discharge to the washing chamber H, where it will be mixed with the small amount of pre-wash water therein after the latter has been circulated by the impeller in contact with the dishes to effect softening of the food particles and other materials adhering to the dishes. The main washing operation will then begin, and will continue until the drain valve is opened.

In the meantime, the multiple surface heater 55 within the receptacle 29 will serve to heat the rinse water therein, steam being generated which will collect in the upper end of the inverted container 29b whereby to force the water from the container to-raise the level within the receptacle 29. As soon as the steam has forced the water below the level of the switch 59, current will cease to flow through the electro-magnet 23 which will then become de-energized and allow the spring 22 to open the drain valve 29 to permit the wash water to escape into the tank 25. Assoon as the water reaches the heater 55 the latter will be included in the motor circuit and will afford additional heating mearfisior the liquid substantially at the level of its discharge from the receptacle.

At about the time the heater 5 becomes immersed the rinse water in the receptacle 29 will have reached the inlet end of the by-pass pipe 5la through which a small amount of water will flow to and through the supply pipe 49, and into the washing chamber where it will serve as a pro-rinse supply for washing out the soapsuds and food particles which may have accumulatedin the lower portion of the chamber ll but without disturbing the soapy film or suds adhering to the walls of the upper portion of the chamber and the dishes, it being understood that this will be done with the drain valve at open position and with the motor circuit closed through switch 51 to continue operation of the impeller.

After the pre-rinse operation is completed, the water will be raised to a level in receptacle 29 at which it will start operation of the siphon 5| to withdraw the main supply of rinse water from the receptacle. The rinse water is discharged by the siphon tube into the small compartment 39 containing the switch units 59 and 59, at

which time the switch 59 will be closed to again energize the electro-magnet 23 to efl'ect closing of the valve 29 for maintaining the rinse water in the washing chamber, current then flowing through switch 51, conductors 92 and 93, switch 59, conductors 94 and 99, electro-magnet 23 and conductors 9| and 91.

Switch 59 will also be closed by the water entering compartment 39, current flowing through switch 51, conductor 92, switch 59, conductor 95, electro-magnet 69 and conductors 95 and 91. Thus the electro-magnet 99 for releasing the closure no will be energized whereby its armature will be moved from the position shown in Fig. 11 to that shown in Fig. 12, at which it will be held during the final rinsing period. After the main supply of rinsing water has been withdrawn from the receptacle 29, there will still remain a certain amount of water in the small container 59 within which the switch 51 is disposed which will be sumcient tokeep the motor circuit closed and the motor running..

At the same time the water within the small containers 69, within which the switches 51 and 59 are disposed, will be suflicient to close said switches so that the electro-magnets 23 and 59 will remain energized for the desired length of time. When the water in the containers 55 has boiled down to a level below the blades of the switches therein, the motor circuit will be opened and the electro-magnets 23 and 59 will become de-energized at which time the drain valve 29 will be moved by the spring 22 to open position and the armature I8 of magnet 69 released for movement by the spring 19 to release the cover latch 12 whereby the springs II will raise the cover to the dotted line position shown in Fig. 1 in order to provide for ventilation of the washing chamber and proper drying of the dishes before removing the same from said chamber.

It will be understood as previously stated, that the adjustable resistance 24, in series with the water heaters 53 and 55, is employed not only to limit the current draw of the heaters when waters of different degrees of conductivity are used, but also to heat the drain pipe I! to warm or heat the water held therein during the washing and rinsing operations.

It will be understood that either hot or cold water may be used in starting the machine, but that if hot water is used the time required to generate suflicient steam in the receptacles 2| and 29 to raise the liquid to a level at which to start operation of the siphons will be considerably reduced.

It will also be understood that where the machines are used in different localities having water the conductivity of which varies, that the current can be regulated accordingly by means of the variable resistance indicated diagrammatically at 24 in Fig. 15.

While the liquid contact switches shown in Figs. 3 and 5 are provided primarily as circuit controlling means they nevertheless constitute electric heating devices which will serve to increase or raise the temperature of the liquid by reason of the discharge of the current therethrough and through the leaves of the heater.

By placing the leaves of the heater 54 in superimposed relation as shown in Fig. 3, the supply of heat will be gradually increased as the level of the liquid rises since the leaves will be successively contacted by the liquid. Furthermore, by placing the heater 54 near the level of discharge of the liquid from the receptacle 2!, the rinsing liquid can be delivered to the dish washing chamber at relatively high temperatures which may be controlled or regulated by increasing or decreasing the capacity of the heater.

It will be noted that the vent pipe 45 is extended a considerable distance within the inverted container 281) and it will be understood that the liquid within the container will not rise above the level of the lower end of the pipe by reason of the air trapped within the upper portion of the container, which cannot escape since the pipe will be closed by the liquid when raised to the level indicated in Fig. 2. It will be further understood that the air trapped within the upper end of the container will tend to expand upon being heated by the liquid whereby to increase the pressure on the latter. When steam is generated within the container the pressure will be increased and the liquid raised to the desired level within the receptacle 28.

The modification shown in Fig. 19 embodies a liquid heating device or receptacle of a type which may be substituted for the heating receptacles shown in Figs. 1 to 5, inclusive, if desired. The modified receptacle is indicated at "a and has a liquid supply pipe "a which may be connected with any suitable supply source such, for example, as a water supply pipe having a valve for controlling the flow of the water. Extending from the receptacle is a discharge conduit 86a adapted to be projected within the dish washing chamber i4 and to deliver the liquid thereto for circulation therein by the impeller l5.

Any desired number of liquid heating or circuit controlling devices of any preferred type aamasa may be disposed within the receptacle a for heating and controlling the ilow oi the liquid. one oi such heaters being shown by way of example at "a in Fig. 19, which may be of the liquid contact type shown in Figs. 1 to 5, inclusive, or of any preferred design.

It will be understood that liquid heating receptacleg of the type shown in Fig. 19 may be substituted for the receptacles 2| and 20 of Figs. 2 and 3 and provided with the same or corresponding liquid heating and circuit controlling devices for cooperation in heating and controlling the iiow of the liquid and for energizing the electro-magnets for controlling the operation of the drain valve and latch means for the closure of the washing container. It will be further understood that in such an arrangement the siphon tubes will be omitted, but that a compartment corresponding to that shown at II in Fig. 3 and'including the switches or circuit control devices therein may be connected with the receptacle "a containing the rinsing liquid to function in the manner and for the purpose previously described herein.

Furthermore, since with the modified type of receptacle shown in Fig. 19 the liquid is discharged directly to the washing chamber by the pressure of the steam within the receptacles, they may be located within the casing Ill below the washing container or so arranged therein as to permit the size of the casing to be reduced to a minimum.

A self closing valve 88a is provided at the discharge end of the supply pipe 85a which will be automatically closed by the pressure of the steam within the receptacle. The level of the liquid in the receptacle a is indicated at "a, it being understood, however, that the quantity of liquid placed within the receptacle may be varied as desired and that the heating devices may be ad- Justed or placed at diflerent levels within the receptacles, as diiferent conditions may require.

In the operation of the machine the compartments of the measuring tank are first provided with the desired quantities of pre-wash, wash, and rinsing water and upon swing the tank from the position shown in Fig. 2 to that shown in Fig. l, the water will be discharged to the receptacles 21, 28, and 29, respectively, the prewash water being preferably discharged by gravity to the washing chamber ll as shown along line ill of Fig. 20. Upon discharging the washing and rinsing water to the receptacles 2| and 29, respectively, the heaters 53 and II will begin to heat the water therein. At the same time the motor control switch 51 within the receptacle 2! will be closed by the water to start operation of the motor and likewise the switch I will also be closed by the water to permit the coil 23 to become energized to eflect closing of the drain valve 2|. The impeller I! will then circulate the cold or tepid pre-wash water within the washing chamber and mix it with the detergent placed therein, the circulation of the mixture in contact with the dishes serving to soften and loosen the food or foreign particles adhering to the dishes, and particularly the albuminous materials which are difilcult to remove when allowed to dry on the dishes as diagrammatically indicated between the line I 00 and Ill oi Fig. 20. At the completion of the period of circulation of the pre-wash water the main supply of wash water, under the pressure of the steam generated within the receptacle 2', will be discharged to the washing chamber and mixed with the pre-wash water and circulated in contact with the dishes to wash the same as indicated at line lfli of Fig. 20. At about the time the washing operation is completed the rinsing water within the receptacle 29 will be forced below the switch 56 by the steam in the inverted receptacle 29b. thus de-energizing the magnet 23 for closing the drain valve and allowing the latter to be opened by the spring 22 to permit the water to discharge from the washing chamber as indicated between lines lill and I02 of Fig. 20.

At about the time this operation is completed the water within the receptacle 29 will be forced upwardly therein by the pressure of I the steam to a level at which a small amount of pre-rinse water will discharge through the restricted by-pass m to and through the conduit 44 to the washing chamber where it will be discharged in contact with the upper ends of the impeller blades at which time the impeller is still being driven by the motor as indicated at line I03 of Fig. 20. Due to the relatively small amount of pre-rinse water permitted to discharge through the by-pass Sid and its rather slow rate of discharge from the conduit 44, the greater portion of the water will be acted upon by the upper ends of the blades oi the impeller and thrown oil by the same in a lateral direction within the lower portion of the washing chamber only, whereby to effect discharge of the soap-suds and food particles which may have accumulated therein, it being understood that at this time the drain valve is still at open position. However, since the pre-rinse water is not permitted to circulate within the upper portion of the washing chamber the soapsuds adhering to the walls thereof and to the dishes will remain thereon and be taken up by the main supply of rinse water which is discharged by the impeller to all parts of the washing chamber with the drain valve in closed position.

By the time the pre-rinse operation is completed the steam in the receptacle 29 wfll have raised the water to a level sufllcient to start operation of the siphon 5| which will then begin to deliver the water to the compartment 39 for passage therethrough to and through the conduits 52 and 33 to the washing chamber as indicated at line iii of Fig. 20. When the water is discharged to said compartment it will close the switches 59 and 59 therein to energize magnets 23 and 60, respectively, the former for operating the drain valve to close the outlet of the washing chamber and the latter for moving the door-controlling armature 18 from the position shown in Fig. 11 to that shown in Fig. 12 for effecting release of the latch for the door when the final rinsing operation is completed, whereby to admit air to the washing chamber to facilitate drying of the dishes therein.

Upon delivery of the main supply of rinse water to the washing chamber it will be circulated therein by the impeller at which time the soap-suds or film of soap adhering to the upper walls of the washing chamber and to the dishes will become mixed with the rinsing water and circulated therewith in contact with the dishes as indicated between lines I03 and I05 of Fig. 20.

After substantially all of the rinsing water has been discharged from the receptacle 29 and the compartment 30 to the washing chamber, the motor will continue to operate for a short period to complete the rinsing operation, the motor switch during this time being kept closed by the small amount of water held within the upper container 94 within which the switch is disposed. The switches It and 59 disposed within the lower container 64, which serve to control the magnets 23 and 39, respectively, are likewise kept closed by the wather therein during the completion of the rinsing period. However, as soon as the water has boiled down within the switch holding containers 94, the motor will stop and the magnets become de-energized to allow the drain valve and door for the washing chamher to be automatically opened by the springs associated therewith as indicated at line ilSof Fig. 20. v

I claim:

1. In washing apparatus, a containerfor the washing liquid, means including an electric motor for circulating the liquid within the container, a receptacle in which to heat the liquid, said receptacle having an outlet for the liquid connected with the container, electric heating means within the receptacle for heating a body of liquid therein normally below the level of said outlet to generate steam within the receptacle, means for maintaining the steam in such relation to the liquid as to cause it to exert pressure thereon suflicient to discharge it through said outlet to said container, and an energizing,circuit for said motor and electric heating means, said heating means operating as a switch and being closed by contact with the liquid within the receptacle.

2. In washing apparatus. a container for the washing liquid, an impeller for circulating the liquid within the container, an electric motor for operating the impeller, a receptacle in which to heat the liquid, a conduit for discharging the liquid from the receptacle to the container, an electric heater within the receptacle for heating a body of liquid therein to generate steam, means for maintaining the steam in such relation to the liquid as to cause it to exert pressure thereon sufllcient to discharge the liquid through said conduit to said container, said heater having spaced contacts closed by the liquid, and an energizing circuit for said motor in which the heater is included.

3. In washing apparatus, a container for the washing liquid having an outlet, an impeller for circulating the liquid within the container, an electric motor for operating the impeller, a receptacle in which to heat the liquid, a conduit for discharging the liquid from the receptacle to the container. an electric heater within the receptacle for heating a body of liquid therein to generate steam, means for maintaining the steam in such relation to the liquid as to cause it to exert pressure thereon sufllcient to discharge the liquid through the conduit to the container, said heater having spaced contacts closed by the liquid, an energizing circuit for said motor in which the heater is included, a drain valve for said outlet, and an electro-magnet for operating the valve.

4. In washing apparatus, a container for the liquid having an. outlet, an impeller for circulating the liquid within the container, an electric motor for operating the impeller, a receptacle in which to heat the liquid, a conduit for discharging the liquid from the receptacle to the container, an electric heater within the receptacle for heating a body of liquid therein to generate steam, means for maintaining the steam in such relation to-the liquid as to cause it to exert pressure thereon sufllcient to discharge the liquid through the conduit to the container, an energiaing circuit for said motor and heater, a drain valve for said outlet, an electro-magnet for operating the valve connected to the circuit, a closure for the container, latching means for the closure, and an electro-magnet for controlling the operation of the latching means connected to said circuit.

5. In wash n apparatus, a container having a washing chamber, a receptacle for the washing liquid, a second receptacle for the rinsing liquid, conduit means connecting said receptacles with the washing chamber, an electric heating device within each of said receptacles for generating steam therein, said devices including spaced contacts closed by the liquid, means within each receptacle for causing the steam to exert pressure on the liquid to discharge the liquid through the conduit means to the washing chamber, said heating devices completing their respective operations in a predetermined sequence whereby the rinsing liquid will be delivered to said washing chamber at a predetermined time subsequent to the delivery of the washing liquid thereto, an impeller within the washing chamber, an electric motor for operating the impeller, and means forming an energizing circuit in which one of said electric heating devices and said motor are included.

6. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality oi liquid holding receptacles, means for heating the liquid within the receptacles, means for conveying the liquid of the different receptacles to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid within the washing chamber discharged thereto from each receptacle, and means controlled by a variation in the level of the liquid in certain of the receptacles and operating at the expiration of each period of circulation to effect discharge of the liquid from the washing chamber.

7. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid holding receptacles, means for heating the liquid within the receptacles, means for conveying the liquid of the different receptacles to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid within the washing chamber discharged thereto from each receptacle, and means operating automatically at the expiration of each period of circulation to effect discharge of the liquid from the washing chamber, said means including an electro-magnet and a circuit therefor having switch means controlled by a variation in the level of the liquid within certain of the receptacles.

8. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid holding receptacles, means for conveying the liquid of the different receptacles to the washing chamber at preretermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid within the washing chamber discharged thereto from each receptacle, said means comprising an electrically operated device having a circuit including switch means disposed within one of the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when it is at different predetermined levels therein.

9. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid holding receptacles, means forconveying the liquid of the different receptacles to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid within the washing chamber discharged thereto from each receptacle, said means comprising an electrically operated device having a circuit including switch means disposed within one of the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when it is at predetermined levels therein, and means operating automatically at the expiration of each period of circulation to effect discharge of the liquid from the washing chamber.

10. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid feeding receptacles, means for conveying the liquid of the receptacles to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid of the different receptacles within the washing chamber, said means comprising an electrically operated device having a circuit including switch means disposed within one of the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when at different predetermined levels therein, and means operating automatically at the expiration of the different periods of circulation to effect discharge of the liquid of the diflerent receptacles from the washing cham her, said last mentioned means including an electro-magnet connected to the circuit and a plurality of switches for controlling the same connected to said circuit, said switches being disposed within certain oi the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when at different predetermined levels therein.

11. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid feeding receptacles, means for discharging the liquid of the receptacles to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid of the different receptacles within the washing chamber for predetermined periods, said means comprising an electrically operated device having a circuit including an electric switch disposed within one of the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when at predetermined levels therein, and means operating automatically at the expiration of the different periods of circulation to effect discharge of the liquid of the different receptacles from the washing chamber, said last mentioned means including a drain valve for the washing chamber and also including an electro-magnet connected to the circuit, and switches connected to the circuit for controlling the operations of the magnet, said switches being disposed in different receptacles and each being closed and opened by the liquid at different levels therein, the opening of the different switches being timed to occur, respectively, at the expiration of the different periods of circulation.

12. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid feeding receptacles, electric heaters therein, one disposed within each of the receptacles for heating the liquid to a predetermined temperature, means connected with the receptacles for discharging the liquid therefrom to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals. electric means operable when energized to circulate the liquid of the different receptacles within the washing chamber for predetermined periods, electric switch means closed and opened by the liquid of one of the receptacles controlling the operation of said electric means, and means operating automatically at the expiration of each period of circulation to discharge the liquid from the washing chamber.

13. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid feeding receptacles, means connecting the receptacles with the washing chamber, electric heaters therein, said heaters being disposed within certain of the receptacles for generating steam therein under pressure sufiicient to effect discharge of the liquid from the different receptacles at predetermined intervals through said connecting means to the washing chamber, electric means operable when energized to circulate the liquid of the different receptacles within the washing chamber for predetermined periods, electric switch means controlling the operation of said electric means closed and opened by the liquid of one of the receptacles, and means operating automatically at the expiration of each period of circulation to discharge the liquid from the washing chamber.

14. In washing apparatus, a container having a discharge conduit, a plurality of liquid holding receptacles, means for discharging the liquid of the different receptacles to the container at predetermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid of the different receptacles within the container for predetermined periods, said means comprising an impeller and an electric motor for operating the same, an electric circuit for the motor including switch means disposed within one of the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when at predetermined levels therein,

a heating coil for said discharge conduit connected to the circuit, and means connected to said circuit and operating automatically at the expiration of each period of circulation to eflect discharge of the liquid from the container through said conduit.

15. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a closure for the chamber, latching means for the closure, a plurality of liquid feeding receptacles, means for delivering the liquid of the receptacles to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals, means for circulating the liquid of the different receptacles within the washing chamber for predetermined periods, said means comprising an electrically operated device having a circuit including switch means disposed within one of the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when at predetermined levels therein, means operating automatically at the expiration of each period of circulation to effect discharge of the liquid from the washing chamber, said last mentioned means including an electro-magnet and a plurality of switches connected to said circuit, said switches being disposed within certain of the receptacles and closed and opened by the liquid when at different predetermined levels therein, and means connected to and controlled by said circuit and operating automatically upon completion of the washing operations to eiIect release of said latching means.

16. A washing machine comprising a plurality of feed receptacles, means for heating liquid in said receptacles, a washing chamber, 'an impeller in said chamber, means for feeding liquid from said receptacles to said chamber sequentially automatically when the liquid in said receptacles has been properly heated, liquid discharge means for said washing chamber, and means controlling operation of said discharge means automatically in response to liquid conditions in said receptacles.

17. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid feeding receptacles, electric heaters therein, one disposed within each of the receptacles for heating the liquid to a predetermined temperature, means connected with the receptacles for discharging the liquid therefrom to the washing chamber at predetermined intervals, electric means operable when energized to circulate the liquid of the difierent receptacles within the washing chamber for predetermined periods, electric means operating automatically at the expiration of each period of circulation to discharge the liquid from the washing chamberand an electric switch means closed and opened by the liquid in one of the receptacles controlling the operation of one of said electric means.

18. In a dish washing machine, liquid-holding means, heating means for said liquid-holding means, means responsive to a rising temperature of one body of liquid in said liquid-holding means for exerting a control on an operation of said dish washing machine, means responsive to rising temperature of another body of liquid in said liquid-holding means to exert another control on said operation, and means utilizing liquid heated in said liquid-holding means for washing dishes in said machine.

19. In a washing machine, a washing chamber, a liquid circulator for said chamber, a plurality of liquid holding devices, heating means for said devices, starting means for said circulator, means dependent on the heating of liquid in one of said devices for introducing liquid into said washing chamber and exerting a control on a washing operation. and means dependent on the heating of liquid in another of said devices for terminating said'washing operation.

20. In a washing machine, a washing chamber, a liquid circulator for said chamber, a plurality of liquid holding devices, heating means for said devices, starting means for said circulator, means dependent on the heating of liquid in one of said devices for introducing liquid into said washing chamber and exerting a control on a washing operation. and means dependent on the heating of liquid in another of said devices for terminating said washing operation and initiating a second washing operation in said chamber.

21. In a washing machine, a washing chamber, a liquid circulator for said chamber, a plurality of liquid holding devices, heating means for said devices, liquid measuring means for said devices, means responsive to the operation of said liquid measuring means for initiating the operation 01' said liquid circulator, means responsive to the heating of liquid in one of said devices for introducing liquid heated in one of said devices into said chamber and exerting a control on a washing operation, means dependent on the heating of liquid in another of said devices for terminating said washing operation, introducing liquid heated in one of said devices into said chamber, and initiating a second washing operation.

22. In a washing machine. a washing chamber, a liquid circulator for said chamber, a liquid holding receptacle provided with a steam trap, heating means for said liquid holding receptacle, means responsive to the accumulation of steam in said steam trap for discharging liquid from said receptacle into said washing chamber. and means responsive to the presence of liquid in said receptacle governing the operation'of said circulator.

23. In a washing machine, a washing chamber, operating means for effecting a washing operation in said washing chamber, a liquid holding device, heating means for said device, means for starting said operating means, and means dependent on the heating of liquid in said. device for terminating the operation of said operating means.

24. In an apparatus of the character disclosed, a first liquid holding means, a second liquid holding means, means for heating liquid in both said liquid holding means, control means responsive to the heating of said first liquid holding means for initiating an operation, contro1 means reholding means for terminating said first operation after a predetermined time and inwiating a second operation.

25. In washing apparatus, a washing chamber, liquid holding means, means for conveying liquid from said liquid holding means to the washing chamber, means for circulating the liquid within the washing chamber discharged thereto from said liquid holding means, said means comprising an electrically operated device having a circuit including switch means disposed within said liquid holding means and closed and opened by the liquid when it is at different predetermined levels therein.

26. A washing machine comprising feed receptacle means, means for heating liquid in said receptacle means, a washing chamber, means for swung mucncnb 000185 01 water H0!!! 5510 I6- ceptacle means to said chamber sequentially automatically when the liquid in said receptacle means has been properly heated, liquid discharge means for said washing chamber, and means controlling operation of said discharge means automatically in response to liquid conditions in said receptacle means.

27. In a washing machine, a washing chamber, a plurality of liquid holding devices, heating means for said devices, means dependent on the heating of liquid in one of said devices for introducing liquid into said washing chamber and exerting a control on a washing operation, and means dependent on the heating of liquid in another of said devices for terminating said washing operation.

DONALD K. FERRIS.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification134/57.0DL, 134/111, 134/188, 134/105, 392/328, 134/95.1, 134/186, 134/106, 134/96.1, 137/581, 134/97.1, 134/99.1, 137/124, 392/331
International ClassificationA47L15/42, A47L15/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47L15/4259, A47L15/4297, A47L15/06
European ClassificationA47L15/42J6A, A47L15/06, A47L15/42W