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Publication numberUS2315242 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1943
Filing dateAug 10, 1942
Priority dateAug 10, 1942
Publication numberUS 2315242 A, US 2315242A, US-A-2315242, US2315242 A, US2315242A
InventorsBriggs Quentin L, Voyls Raymond A
Original AssigneeBriggs Quentin L, Voyls Raymond A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Moving toy and projector therefor
US 2315242 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 30, 1943. Q I S ETAL 2,315,242

MOJYING TOY AND P ROJECTOR THEREFOR Filed Aug. '10, 1942 fizzxeizz or-s 3 8. 34 fi Um 50 w Patented Mar. 30, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT! OFFICE MOVING TOY 2,315,242 ANDPROJECTOR THEREFOR Quentin L. Brim and Raymond A. Voyls,

- Chicago, 111.

Application August 10, 1942, Serial No. 454,204 Claims. (01. 46-81) It is also an object to provide a toy and projector utilizing air pressure as the propelling force, which are so constructed that the air pressure acts on the toy for an appreciable length of time suflicient to permit the toy to accelerate to a desirable speed.

Another object is to provide a toy such'as an I airplane and projector of the foregoing character in which a seal betweenthe projector and airplane is established in bringing the two into cooperative relation, so that built up in the projector acceleration of the airplane.

Still another object is to provide a projector for a toy such as an airplane, which comprises a piston and cylinder to creat the air pressure, and a nozzle or discharge tube to receive the-toy airplane, and in which the cylinder is of substantialpressure may be readily suiiicient to cause rapid 1y larger diameter than the nozzle to insure a sufficient volume of air under project the airplane.

A further object is to provide a toy airplane pressure to effectively projector provided with a cylinder of larger diameter than the nozzle as mentioned above, so that the speed of movement of the air in the nozzle is proportionally greater than in the cylinder, thus imparting to the airplane a speed much greater than the speed of the hand in moving the piston.

A still further object is to provide a toy airplane and projector utilizing air pressure to project the airplane, and in which the airplane is provided with a rearwardly opening hollow body subjected to air pressure created in the projector, so that the air under pressure within the hollow body will, after the airplane has left the projector and no longer receives pressure therefrom, produce a rocket action in escaping from the body.

It is a further object to provide a novel toy airplane and projector which may be made oi materials, suchas wood and paper. not subject to restrictions due to war conditions, and suitable for inexpensive manufacture.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a projector and toy airplane embodying the features of our invention.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section of the projector with the airplane-positioned thereon.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view of a portion of the airplane.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view'on a reduced scale showing the airplane justafter it has left the projector. I

While the invention is susceptible of various modifications and alternative constructions, I

have shown in the drawing and will herein describe in detail, the preferred embodiment, but it is to be understood that I do not thereby intend to limit the invention to the specific formdisclosed, but intend to cover all modifications and alternative constructions falling within the spirit and scope or the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

A device embodying the features of the invention comprises a projector in the form of a manually operated pump, and a toy adapted to be placed thereon and to be projected therefrom, at a speed sufiicient to move through a considerable distance, by air pressure created by the pump and acting directly on the toy. To this end I have provided a projector comprising-a piston and cylinder type of pump adapted to be manual- 1y operated and having anelongated nozzle extending therefrom. The toy may be in the form of a vehicle or a projectile to fly through the air. In the present instance, I have shown an airplane comprising a body member having wing and tail structure secured thereto. The body member is adapted to be placed in telescopic relation with the nozzle of the projector for a substantial distance. As illustrated herein. the body is in the form of a tube closed at its front end and telescoping over the nozzle. When air pressure is created in the pump such pressure acts directly on the interior of the body member of the airplane and forces it off the nozzle and into the air at a suiiicient, speed to cause it to fly or glide To cause the entire period of the telescopic relation, the nozzle of the projector has a relatively snug fit 'withinthe body of the airplane, that is, a sumciently snug fit to prevent any material loss of.

[to move, to give the airplane a rapid acceleration.

In order to accelerate the airplane to a' sumciently great speed, the construction is such that a sufficient volume of air under pressure is created to maintain pressure on the airplane during its entire passage along-the nozzle and so'that the speed of the plane is not limited to that of the manual movementof the piston. To this end, the diameter of the cylinder of the pump is substantally greater-than the diameter of the nozzle or the internal diameter or the body of the plane. Thus the volume of air under pressure created by the pump is suflicient, despite some leakage, to maintain the propelling force during the entire movement of the plane along the nozzle. --Moreover, such difference in diameter makes it possible-to have the plane accelerated to a speed much greater than one is capable of giving the'piston of the pump in operat-. ing it by hand.

Further, not only is the propelling force acting on the airplane during its entire movement along the nozzle, but-immediately after the airplane has left the nozzle, the air pressure then existing 'withinthe body of the airplane produces a forward thrust on the airplane in the nature of :a rocket action in reducing to normal atmospherlc pressure.

The entire 'device, that-is, .both the projector and the airplane, is made of simple inexpensive materials which are notsubject to restriction due to war-conditions. Thus the projector or pump may have its cylinder 'or barrel and its nozzle 1 made of paper-board with the end plugs for the cylinder and the piston and piston rod made of wood, while theairplane may be made entirely of paper board except for the plug in the front end which preferably is made of wood.

, As illustrated in the drawing, the preferred embodiment of my invention comprises a projector,

indicated generally at in, and a vehicle or projectile such as an airplane, indicated generally at i I.

\Since the projector is such as to cause acceleration of the airplane by air pressure, the projector comprises preferably a piston pump having a barrel or cylinder I2 in which is mounted a piston l3 having apiston rod 14. The ends of the cylinder are closed by plugs 'i 5 having shoulders i6 abutting against the end edges of the cylinder and a reduced portion il extending a short distance into the cylinder. The plug [5 at the rear end of the cylinder is provided with a central aperture to permit the piston rod I 4 to extend therethrough and to be guided thereby. On the outer end of the piston rod is a handle, such as a ball ill, by which the piston may. be readily manipulated. The plug iii in the front end of the cylinder is provided with a central aperture and an elongated tubular element or nozzle 20 extending therefrom. To simplify the attachment of the nozzle, the aperture is of sufficient diameter so that the nozzle fits firmly therein.

p 2,815,242 the air pressure to act to its fullest extent during The projectile cooperating with the projector, as mentioned above, is for purposes of illustration in the form of an airplane and preferably comprises a body 2| having a wing structure 22 and a tail structure 23 secured thereto. While in the case of some forms of projectiles the body may telescope either inside or outside of the nozzle, the body 2| is in the form of an elongated tube adapted to fit over the nozzle 20. Preferably the flt between the body 2| and the nozzle is such that very little loss of air pressure will occur therebetween and yet the two may readily slide relative to each other. In the front end of the body member 2| is a closure plug 24 so that the air pressure from the pump will cause the airplane to slide oil the nozzle 20. Preferably the plug 2i has a shoulder 25 abutting the end of the body 2| and a tapered portion 26 extending into the body. Thus when the airplane is telescoped over the nozzle 20, the front end of the nozzle will encircle the tapered portion 26 of the plug 24 and will have a wedging action between the tapered portion and the body 2|. This provides an effective seal so that air pressure is quickly built up to the maximum for initiating movement of the airplane .relative to the projector. This insures rapid acceleration of the airplane.

As mentioned above, the body of the airplane and the nozzle 20 telescope for a substantial length so that the air pressure created by the pump acts on the plane for a relatively sustained "period of time. This permits the airplane to be accelerated for a sufllcient period so that when it leaves the projector it will have speed enough to glide for a considerable distance. Moreover, rapid acceleration of the airplane is brought about by the fact that the diameter of the cylinder of the pump is considerably larger than the internal diameter of the body of the airplane.

Thus, in the present instance, the internal diameter of the pump is substantially twice as large as the internal diameter of the body 2|. This provides for approximately four times the volume of air under pressure produced by the pump for a given length of movement or the piston as the volume of the body of the airplane for the same length. Therefore, neglecting. any slight leakage, the airplane can be accelerated to approximately four times the speed of the movement of the piston. This feature insures suflicient acceleration of the airplane and adequate pressure acting thereon during the entire period that the body of the airplane is moving along the nozzle. Also the pressure on the airplane acts on the front end of the body so that the airplane moves straight forward and does not tend to tumble.

At the point where the body of the airplane leaves the nozzle 20 the pressure within the body is still that created by the pump. Immediately after the body leaves the nozzle, the air under pressure reduces to atmospheric pressure by rushing out the rear end of the body. This gives a forward thrust to the airplane in the nature or a rocket action further accelerating the airplane.

The construction of both the projector and airplane is such that it may be made out or inexpensive materials and at a low cost of production. Thus, the barrel or cylinder l2 and the nozzle 20 of the pump, as well as the tubular body 2| of the airplane may be made of paper board of standard form. The wings 22 and tail 23 of the airplane may also be made of paper board of suitable thickness.

The' plugs IS in the ends of the cylinder and the plug. in the front end of the airplane, as

of the body of the toy and having a discharge nozzle adapted to telescope snugly withthebody of the toy, a pressure stroke of the pump being adapted to. create air pressure to force-the toy and the nozzle out of telescopic relation, the larger diameter of the pump insuring sustained pressure on the toy during its passage from the nozzle.

5. A projector for a toy having an elongated- I tubular body closed at its front end and open at its rear end, comprising a manually operated piston type pump having a discharge nozzle adapted to telescope snugly within the tubular body of I the toy, said pump having a substantially larger and the body 2l. By pointingthe projector in I the direction it is desired to have the airplane travel. and then forcing the piston. forwardly with a relatively quick stroke, the, airplane is forced off the nozzle at a considerable speed and will glide for a relatively great distance through the air."

From the foregoing, it isa'ppare'nt that I have provided a novel toy and projector in which air pressure produced manually is utilized to accelerate the toy to a suflicientinitial velocity to move for considerable distance. The air pressure acts on the toy for .a relatively great length of time so that in the case where the toy is an airplane it becomes sufllciently accelerated to have a flying or gliding speed. The difference in diameter between the pump and the body of the airplane creates suflicient air under pressure to insure an adequate propelling; force and to cause the airplane to move at a considerably greater speed than the movement of the piston of the pump. Moreover, the seal between the front end of the nozzle of the pump and the airplane insures that the pressure created in the pump quickly reaches its maximum to rapidly accelerate the airplane. Further acceleration of the airplane is caused by the rocket action of the air under pressure escapingfrom the body at the time it leaves the nozzle.

We claim as our invention:

1. A projector for a toy airplane having an elongated hollow body comprising a manually operated piston pump having an elongated tubular discharge nozzle adapted to be telescopically received in the body of the airplane, the telescoped portions of said nozzle and said body being of substantial length whereby air pressure created by the pump may act on the body of the airplane for a suillcient length of time to permit the airplane to be accelerated to flying speed.

2. A projector for a toy airplane having an elongated hollow body comprising a manually operated piston type air pump having a discharge nozzle adapted to be inserted into the hollow body of the airplane from the rear end of the latter, said body and said nozzle telescoping for a substantial length whereby the air pressure created by the pump acts on the airplane for a substantial period of time to suiilciently accelerate it for flying.

3. A projector for a toy having an elongated tubular body closed at its front end and open at its rear end comprising a manually operated piston type pump, and an elongated nozzle adapted to be telescopically received in the tubular body for substantially the entire length thereof and to fit relatively closely within said body whereby air pressure created by the pump will act to accelerate the toy.

4. A projector for a toy having a body, comprising a manually operated piston pump having a diameter substantially greater than the diameter diameter than the diameter of the tubular body whereby the volume of air displaced by' the pump will cause the toy to move at substantially greater speed than the movement of the piston to rapidly accelerate the toy.

6. A projector for a toy having a tubular body closed at its front endby a tapered plug and having its rear end open, compris ing a manually operated'piston type pump having a tubular discharge nozzle adapted .to be telescopically received within the bodyoi' the toy, the front end of said discharge nozzle being adapted to wedge between said tapered plug and the body to effect a sealing relation to attain maximum pressure before initial movement of the toy and thereby insuring rapid acceleration of vthe toy.

. 7. A toy airplane and projector therefor, the projector comprising a manually operated piston pump provided with an elongated nozzle, the airplane having a hollow body adapted to be telescoped snugly over the'nozzle for a substantial length'and adapted to be projected therefrom by air pressure generated by the pump and acting internally on the hollow body, said air pressure being sustained by the action of the pump during the period while the airplane and nozzle are in telescopic relation to accelerate the airplane to fllying speed, the pressure remaining in the hollow body immediately after the airplane has left the nozzle producing a rocket action further accelcrating the airplane.

8. A toy airplane adapted to be projected into the air by air pressure created within a tubular element and comprising a body member having wing and tail structure secured thereto, said body member comprising an elongated tube open at its rear end and adapted to be telescoped and fit snugly over said tubular element, and closure means for the front end of said elongated tube shaped to eil'ect a seal for said tubular element when engaged thereby, the air pressure created within said tubular element forcing the body member of the tubular element and thereby pro- Jecting the airplane into the air.

9. A toy airplane adapted to be projected into the air by pressure created within a tubular element and comprising a body member having wing and tail structure secured thereto, said body member comprising an elongated tubular member and a plug closing its front end, the tubular body member being adapted to be telescoped over said tubular element and the plug being constructed to seal the end of said tubular element, the air pressure obtained ,because of such sealing relation acting against the plug in the front end of the body member to initiate movement of the airplane and project it into th air. 10. A toy airplane adapted to be projected into the air by air pressure created within a tubular element and comprising a body member having wing and tail structure secured thereto, said body member comprising an elongated tube and a plug In lts tront end, sald plug having a shoulder fitting against the end of the tube and a tapered portion extending mm the tube, th tube being adapted between the tapered portion of the plug and the tube to eflect a sealln relation therebetween and thereby permit the building of substantial pressure immediately prior to initial movement or the airplane.

QUENIIN L. BRIGGS. RAYMOND A. VOYLS.

.Pntent 30,. 2,31 13 or, commion;

I March 50, 151g. "gnnu mrxj'p nnmes', ET 111..

It is hereby-certified. tiat error appear sin the printed specification or the'above numbered patent i'equir hmg correction as follows: Page 5, seeond'ceimnn, line 56, 01m 8;,"f ei-i 1". read --off---- and. that the said Letters Patent shopld be read with; this-correction therein that the same may conform to the i'e'c o'rd ef-tizhe case-i xfthe Patent Office.

signed 'aiadsealedthiaflth day Jane, A-. 1).191

I Heniy Van Arsdale, (Seal) I j'Acting comissioner' of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2572782 *Sep 27, 1948Oct 23, 1951Hagemo Ingvald JRepeating toy airplane projector
US2587535 *Oct 13, 1948Feb 26, 1952Scott Joseph CAutomatic bubble forming device
US2587536 *Oct 13, 1948Feb 26, 1952Scott Joseph CBubble blowing device
US2587537 *Oct 21, 1948Feb 26, 1952Scott Joseph CBubble blowing apparatus
US2820321 *Nov 23, 1955Jan 21, 1958Bromo Mint Company IncToy airplane
US3077876 *Aug 12, 1960Feb 19, 1963Richter Gunther MLaunching devices
US3513819 *May 31, 1966May 26, 1970Specialty Ideas IncStraw projectile shooter
US4329808 *Jan 22, 1981May 18, 1982Mattel, Inc.Paper-airplane-making and launching device
US4332103 *Jun 27, 1980Jun 1, 1982Life-Like Products, Inc.Model aircraft glider
US4897065 *Jan 30, 1989Jan 30, 1990Marvin Glass & AssociatesToy vehicle and handheld pneumatic launcher
US5058561 *Apr 20, 1990Oct 22, 1991Harvey StarrPopgun for cylindrical projectiles
US5224464 *Oct 28, 1991Jul 6, 1993Tonka CorporationToy archery set
US5242323 *Jul 16, 1992Sep 7, 1993Mark RappaportAir-pulse powered toy bow and arrow set
US5299966 *Feb 22, 1993Apr 5, 1994Rose Iii Thomas MProjectile toy apparatus
US5695153 *Nov 16, 1995Dec 9, 1997Northrop Grumman CorporationLauncher system for an unmanned aerial vehicle
US7410124 *Feb 19, 2004Aug 12, 2008Aai CorporationLightweight air vehicle and pneumatic launcher
US7584925Oct 23, 2007Sep 8, 2009Aai CorporationLightweight air vehicle and pneumatic launcher
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/63, 124/65, 60/269
International ClassificationF41B11/00, F41B11/12
Cooperative ClassificationF41B11/641
European ClassificationF41B11/641