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Publication numberUS2315512 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1943
Filing dateMar 8, 1939
Priority dateMar 8, 1939
Publication numberUS 2315512 A, US 2315512A, US-A-2315512, US2315512 A, US2315512A
InventorsBlair Everson Roy
Original AssigneeBlair Everson Roy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chlorine feeding device
US 2315512 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 6, 1943. R. B. EVERSON CHLORINE FEEDING DEVICE Filed March 8, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. B Bur jf'uezzson/ ATTORNEYS,

April 6, 1943.

R. B. EVERSON 2,315,512

CHLORINE FEEDING DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March a, 1959 5a -4 54 45 .fi/G z 50 .I i I IN VENTOR ATTORNEY Patented Apr. 6, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CHLORINE FEEDING DEVICE Roy Blair Evcrson, Chicago, Ill. Application March 8, 1939, Serial No. 260,559

Claims. .(CL 210-28) The present invention relates to the art of treating liquids with gaseous reagents and more particularly to the treatment of liquids by the controlled addition thereto of predetermined amounts of chlorine.

The present invention more particularly contemplates the provision of a mixing or feeding device, as above, which is particularly adapted to handle chlorine, for example, and is capable of controlledly applying the gaseous reagent to the treatment of water for sterilization and purification purposes, and provides a device which is capable of operating safely and efiiciently for relatively long periods while unattended. It is important in the present art to provide devices which will facilitate the regular and efficient flow of reagents. That is to say, since necessarily small and carefully adjusted amounts of reagent are to be introduced continuously during operation, it is evident that the stream or flow introduced must be maintained under control, as devices of the present class are conventionally used in conjunction with water supply conduits wherein the pressure of the flow may and frequently does vary with changing degrees of rapidity and violence.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a device in which the gaseous reagent is not only controlled in such a manner as to prevent undesirable variations thereof but which at the same time permits a relatively wide selective control of gas feed, while at the same time assuring intimate admixture of all of the gas with the flow of water.

A yet more specific object of the present invention is to provide a control device as above for admixing a reagent gas together with a liquid to be treated and wherein the admixture occurs at a fixed, negative pressure for each setting of the device, but wherein the degree of the pressure is varied in accordance with the flow of gas applied thereto and particularly wherein a controlled increase in the admission of gas to the mixing chamber results in the uncovering of additional admixing ports to facilitate the chemical reaction.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a suction and mixing chamber in which the degree of suction decreases with the controlled increase in the admission of reagent gas for facilita ing adjustment f gas flow in the feeding conduiss, it. being an important object of the present invention to provide such a construction which is capable of operating regularly at all times and free from variable conditions occurring in the liquid conduits.

Among other objects of the present invention are to provide control means for supplying a treatment gas from a source of supply at a widely varying head and to dispense the gas to the system under predetermined pressures controlled in accordance with the pressure of the liquid under treatment; and to provide a gas throttle control device for reducing the pressure of the supply gas by feeding to the system at a constant pressure, which device is adapted to automatically stop the gas flow at pressures above feed pressure.

Numerous other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent throughout the course and progress of the following specification, wherein:

Figure 1 is a more or less diagrammatic layout of the present invention showing the several parts and conduits in operative interconnection, certain of the parts being broken away and shown in section in order to more clearly illustrate the invention. The mechanical supporting means for the various elements are not disclosed for the reason that frames and supports of many widely varying types are known and could be provided by any skilled mechanic, and the disclosure of any such supporting structure would necessarily confuse the disclosure of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a detail sectional View through the gas control and throttling device shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a partial view of a modified system employing a diiTerent gas control;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view through the gas control device used in the system;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view taken centrally through the flow meter shown in Fig. 1; and

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken centrally through the check valve shown in Fig. 1.

Referring to Figures 1 and 2 of the drawings, wherein the present invention is disclosed more in detail, there is shown a conventional gas dispensing cylinder or tank in controlled by a valve at tank outlet fitting l2. The fitting is connected through a conduit I4 to a needle valve [6 and a filter l8 for further controlling the gas liberated from the tank In and separating the impurities. The conduit l4 ultimately connects with a gas regulator 20, which is shown more in detail in Figure 2 of the drawings. The regulator 20 has for its purpose to supply gas to the system at a constant pressure regardless of the normally occurring changes in the ga cylinder Hi. The regulator comprises an upstanding housing 22 flanged outwardly adjacent its lower portions as at 24 for securement to a lower casing 26 by means of machine bolts 28. A movable diaphragm 30 is clampingly mounted between the housing 22 and casing 26. The diaphragm has mounted centrally thereon an attachment block 32, which has a central threaded extension 34 extending through an aperture in the center of the diaphragm and engaged by nut and washer combination 36. Attention is directed to the fact that the diaphragm assembly 30 is, therefore, fluid-tight, wherefore it will at all times separate substances on either side thereof. It will also be understood that the diaphragm 30 is sufilciently flexible to permit vertical reciprocation of its central portions. When using the device for the regulation of chlorine gas, in accordanc with one of the preferred applications of the present invention, the diaphragm should comprise some chlorine resistant material, such as tantalum or silver. A valve member 38 projects downwardly from the block 32, as shown in Figure 2, for cooperation with an annular'valve seat 40. The valve seat is mounted in a partition wall 42, which is integral with the lower casing or housing casting 26. It should be noted] that the partition 42 normally divides this lower casing into two compartments, the right-hand compartment, as shown in Figure 2, being supplied with gas from the conduit M. The compartment on the other side of the partition 42 communicates with the lower face of the diaphragm 30 and supplies the regulated gas to an outlet conduit 44. It will be apparent, therefore, that the flow of gas past the valve 38 and the valve seat 40 will be controlled thereby, in accordance with the position of the diaphragm 30. The diaphragm is controlled by means of liquid pressure in the chamber 22 supplied through a conduit 46, which conduit leads from the source of liquid which it is the purpose of the present invention to treat by means of the gaseous reagent, and the control of which will be hereinafter described more in detail. The diaphragm block 32 serves as a mounting for a rod 48 extending centrally upwardly through the upper casing and chamber 22 and through an apertur in its top wall. A vertically adjustable collar or nut 52 threadedly engages the top end of the rod 48 and clamps a compression spring 50 between the collar and the upper wall of the housing. Therefore, the spring 50 tends to bias the diaphragm in an upward position, where the valve 38 is normally closed. The effective tension of th spring of course may be adjusted by adjusting the nut 52. A removable cap 54 is threadedly mounted on the casing 22 to enclose the spring 50, the nut 52 and the end of the shaft 48.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that in operation the valve 38 is normally closed, so that no gas is admitted from the inlet chamber into the outlet chamber of the device. The device is set into operation by the admission of fluid pressure through the conduit 46 to apply a corresponding force against the upper face of the diaphragm 30, forcing it downwardly against the tension of the spring 50 to open the valve 38. Sinc the gas passing the valve sets up .an increased force against the lower face of the diaphragm, a condition is reached where the gas pressure on the lower face of the diaphragm plus the force of the spring 50 balances the force created by the water on the upper face of the diaphragm, assuming of course that the conduit 44 is closed or sufficiently throttled to prevent escape of any inordinately large amount of gas. That is to say, gas will be supplied to the conduit 44 at a constant pressure, depending upon the water pressure in the conduit 46, regardless of the gas pressure in the inlet or feed conduit l4. The present device, accordingly, serves to reduce to a predetermined value the pressure of the gas from the supply tank In, which, as is known, may vary within wide limits. Pressure gauges 5! and 53 serve to indicate, respectively, the gas pressures in the inlet and outlet chambers of the regulator. A needle valve 55 permits final adjustment of gas flow in the conduit 44.

The conduit 44 terminates at the top portion of a cylindrical t wer 58 adapted to initiate mixing of gases with a suitable liquid, such as water. The tower, accordingly, has an open lower end which is immersed in a water supply box 66. The

'water for the box 66 is supplied from a. main water supply line 68 continuously through an orifice, as will hereinafter be described more in detail. The water level in the box 66 may, accordingly, vary within relative wide limits, depending on the water demand of the device, and in order to care for excessive demands there is provided a branch water supply line which communicates with the water supply box 66 through the agency of a float control valve 12. In the event, therefore, that an abnormal amount of water is withdrawn from the box, the float valve ultimately operates to supply-the needed excess. The overflow drain 14 protects against abnormalities in operation.

The main water supply conduit 68 communicates with an electrical shut-off valve 16, a strainer 18, and a water pressure-reducing valve having water pressure indicating gauges 82 and 84 on either side thereof. The water supply from the pressure-reducing valve 80 is supplied to outlet conduit 86, therefore, at a. predetermined reduced pressure. The conduit 86 is directed reversely in the form of a trap, as show in Figure 1, and thence communicates with an ejector 88. The ejector maybe of any conventional type adapted to create a suction in its side arm 90. It should be noted that the side arm leads directly to a fitting 92, passing through the top wall of the tower 58 and terminating in a downwardly directed, open-ended length of pipe or conduit 94. Accordingly, the liquid under constant pressure passing through the conduit 86 and the ejector 88 to its point of passage creates a suction in the tower 58, tending to draw the contents thereof into the main flow of water and, accordingly, to raise the liquid within the tower 58, as indicated in the drawing.

Attention is particularly directed to the fact that the downwardly directed length of pipe 94 is provided with a series of spaced apertures 96 to permit the water to rise to varying levels within the tower and for admitting gas in fine streams to the resultant flow of water. That is to say, the water which is raised upwardly from the supply box 66 will be drawn into the pipe 94 and the ejector 88 by the suction created therein, the flow of gas being supplied through the pipe 44 at the same time being drawn through the apertures 96 for admixture therewith. The size of the apertures 96 should be preferably selected in accordance with the preferred range of operation of the device, as will hereinafter appear more in detail. In accordance with one preferred embodiment, the apertures 96 possess a diameter of about .010 inch and are spaced a distance of at least one inch, about ten apertures being provided in axial alinement.

As hereinbefore mentioned, the main water supply to the box 66 is continuously supplied from the main water conduit, and this is ac complished by means of a so-called bleeder or orifice pipe I communicating with a venting pipe 98 which 1eads below liquid level in the supply box, as seen in Fig. 1. While the orifice Hill is somewhat restricted, the water supply passing therethrough and down the pipe 56 to the box 66 is substantially the same as that normally drawn from the box.

Since the water supply through the orifice I00 cannot at all times balance the rate of water flow from the tower 58, the water level in the box 66 will vary. It should be noted, however, that in the event that an excess amount of water is taken through the conduit 94, the dropping of the water level in the box will increase the head against which the suction of the ejector 88 must operate, and accordingly the systemtends to ultimately balance. I

It should be noted that the venting conduit 88 leads to the outer atmosphere. As a result, if the system, for some abnormal reason, be

. placed under negative pressure, atmospheric air in the conduit 98 will immediately be communicated directly through the branch pipe or orifice I00 to the main line 86 in suiiicient amount to break the vacuum, and preventing further movement of liquid into the main supply conduit.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that in operation a constant flow of water passes through the conduit 86 and the ejector 88, creating a suction in the branch conduit 86 to draw into the main line 88 a mixture of gas and water from the pipe 94. Control of the water flow may be effected intermittently from a remote point by the magnetic valve "I6, although a manual control valve may be substituted therefor. Actuation of the valve to open position results, therefore, not only in the creation of predetermined water pressure in the conduit 86, but also in the transmission of this pressure to the conduit 46 to actuate the diaphragm 30 downwardly and supply treatment gas to the needle valve 55 under predetermined pressure. The needle valve 55 will then be adjusted to permit the desired flow of gas as indicated by the meter 56. Under these fixed conditions the water will rise to a predetermined level as indicated within the tower. uncovering a certain number of apertures 96 for the admission of gas. Each of these apertures will admit a minute stream of gas into the flow of water to cause intimate contact and, therefore, intermixing of the gas and water. If it is desired, for example, to

substantially double the relative addition of gas to the liquid the valve 55 is further opened to double the gas flow, whereupon the water level in the tower 58 will drop sufi'iciently to uncover, for example, twice the number of gas feed apertures 96. So also, as the needle valve 55 is opened, it should be noted that the water level within the tower 58 will drop to permit relatively great ease of adjustment of the gas flow. Variations in the water supply pressure will not substantially af-.

shown in Figure 3 comprehends the provision of a control valve I 02, shown more clearly in Figure 4, having upper and lower housing portions I04 and I06 mounting therebetween the impermeable diaphragm 30. The diaphragm 30 is normally biased downwardly by a predetermined weight I68. Gas is admitted from the conduit I4 into the chamber formed by the housing I04 through. an orifice IIII normally closed by a needle valve H2. The needle valve H2 is drawn downwardly into orifice-closing position by a linkage II4 connected to the central port of the diaphragm just above the weight I08. With a pressure of atmos pheric or above on the upper side of the diaphragm 38 no gas is admitted to the chamber.

When the remainder of the device is set in operation as above to create a suction in the tower this suction is transmitted through the conduit 44 to lower the pressure on the upper face of the diaphragm 30, drawing the diaphragm upward to release the force on the needle closure H2 and admit gas through the orifice III). The pressure on the lower face of the diaphragm 30 is maintained substantially at atmospheric pressure since the vent 98, connected to the lower housing portion I06, is open to the atmosphere; said vent 98 having suflicient capacity to satisfy any vacuum transmitted thereto, through the orifice I00 by the aspirator 88. A balance will be reached where the negative force on the upper surface of the diaphragm just balances the weight I08. The present embodiment, accordingly, is operative to supply the gas to the tower only at pressures below atmospheric and has the advantage that should the system become at any time open to atmosphere, supply of gas will automatically cease. The same action is generally true should the normal operation of the device at any time be interrupted.

The particular flow meter employed in the organization disclosed in Fig, 1 is shown in detail in Fig. 5. According to this construction the outer transparent cylinder I38 is held between end blocks I32 by axially extending tie bars I34 and encloses the rotameter tube I36. The rotameter tube is mounted upon the bottom block I32 in a conventional manne for receiving the incoming gas flow. The rotameter 56 is of conventional construction and the inner bore of the rotameter tube I36 is tapered downwardly in the usual manher which is old in the rotameter art and which is shown in the United States patents to Ornstein No. 1,188, 984, dated June 7, 1916; Griffith et al., No. 1.864,430, dated June 21, 1932, Sherwood No. 1,889,705, dated November 29. 1932; and Machlet No. 1,899,764, dated February 28, 1933. Thus, for example, Machlet No 1,899,764 shows a rotameter tube IIl provided with a downwardly-tapered inner bore I I a rotameter float I2 being adapted to move vertically within said inner bore I I and providing an annular gas passage or clearance therewith, the area of said clearance I3 being relatively small when the float I2 is at the lower or intake end of the rotameter tube In and being relatively larger when the float I2 is at the upper or discharge end of the tube Ill. The rotameter tube I0 of Machlet is supported at its ends by a metal frame l8 having a hollow head or chamber I9 in communication with the outlet end of the rotameter tube I0. As shown in Fig. 5, the upper block I32 is provided with a transverse bore I38, closed at either end by screw plugs I40. The internal chamber provided by the bore I38 receives a drier cartridge I42, shown in Fig. 5, and comprising a perforated iuse closed. at either end by means of a resilient p The cartridge I42 is loaded with a suit .r preierably chlorine-resistant drying or i bsorbing agent, such as calcium chlo- 1y other dehydrating or hygroscopic may be substituted as equivalents, as will obvious to anyone skilled in the art.

Communication between the rotameter tube I35 the bore 538 efiected through the agency of tube 548 threadeclly engaged into the upper block. as at M8, and having its lower end projecting into the upper bore of the rotameter tube I35, as at Outlet communication between the bore 533 the interior of the cylinder I30 is effected by a duct 252.

supplied through the measuring device, accord gly, necessarily passes through the chamber 2353 and in proximity to the cartridge of the drying agent. It should be particularly noted that any gases or vapors diffusing reversely through the conduit 44, as might occur at time; when the apparatus is shut down, must necessarily pass first through the chamber I38 before reaching the gas control elements. It will be obvious that this construction assures against the harmful regurgitation of moisture or moisture vapors. It should be noted, furthermore, that th 2 tube I436 provides a structural support for the upper end of the normally fragile meter tube I36.

in accordance with another important detail of the present invention, I have shown in Fig. 1 a check valve I54 interposed in the gas supply line. which, check valve performs the function of steadying the how of gas for facilitating operative adjustment of the process. It has been found that the arrangement of this check valve in the position shown eliminates more or less violent ariations of the flow occurring at certain times. The valve 555, shown more in detail in Fig. 6, comprises a coupling sleeve I55 engaged by inlet and outlet fittings I58 and its, respectively. It should noted that the inlet fitting provides an inner sleeve portion I62 projecting into. the space formed within the coupling sleeve I56.

A resilient rubber cap I64 embraces the end of the sleeve portion 52 and has a flange I66 which enters an annula groove in the periphery of the sleeve portion for interlocking the parts together. The lower end of the cap IE4 is provided with a transversely extending rib I88 which is slit longitudinally, as at ill'i. In view of the resilient nature of the cap I64, gas passing downwardly through. the valve, as viewed in Fig. 6, passes free- .ly through the slit I19. Flow, however, cannot occur a reverse direction because the side portions of the rib I68 are forced together to close t till. it willbe understood that many re- .ent elastic materials may be substituted for the rubber employed herein, particularly substa ces which are chemically resistant to the s cm...

she id be noted that the first described embodiment ray be so constructed that the gas eg ulator 2% operate or function only below at- El'iGSlfiilEl'lC pressures in the line 34, in much the manner the other embodiment.

he present invention provides a simple and ,ive gas device, particularly a device St. table for chlorination of liquids, which is and regu er in operation and which lends to control of variable quantities of treat- 7 Control may be intermittently efiected from a i mote point by actuation of the valve 75, for ex mple, in accordance with the operation of pumping instrumentalities and the like. The re- "All mainder of the control device is automatically responsive in response to the operation of this main valve. It is though that the invention and numerous of its attendant advantages will be understood from the foregoing description, and it is obvious that numerous changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the several parts without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention or sacrificing any of its attendant advantages, the form herein described being a preferred embodiment for the purpose of illustrating the invention.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. In a gas mixing and dispensing device, means for conducting a main liquid flow, suction-creating means in said conducting means, a tower extending a substantial distance above normal liquid level, means for supplying said tower with liquid, means to supply gas to said tower, and an outlet conduit in said tower above normal liquid level and connected to said suction-creating means for conveying gas and liquid from the tower, said conduit having a plurality of inlet means spaced therealong at varying elevations whereby the rate of gas flow into said conduit is determined by the extent of submergence of said conduit within said liquid.

2. In a gas mixing and dispensing device, a closed chamber extending above normal liquid level, means for supplying said chamber with liquid, means to introduce a flow of gas to said chamber, an outlet conduit in said chamber above normal liquid level, and means to apply a suction to said conduit, said conduit having a plurality of relatively restricted gas admission means spaced vertically over a substantial distance thereon whereby the rate of gas flow into said conduit is dependent upon the number of said gas admission means unsubmerged within said liquid.

3. In a gas mixing and dispensing device, a closed chamber extending above normal liquid level, means for supplying said chamber with liquid, means to introduce a flow of gas to said chamber, outlet conduit in said chamber above normal liquid level, and means to apply a suction to said conduit to raise the liquid level and to withdraw liquid from said chamber, said conduit having a plurality of relatively restricted gas admission means spaced over a substantial vertical distance along the length thereof, whereby the rate of gas flow into said conduit is dependent upon the number of said gas admission means unsubmerged Within said liquid, said gas admission means being adapted to supply the gas to the liquid flowing within said conduit in fine streams to promote intimate admixture with said liquid.

4. In a gas mixing and dispensing device, a chamber, outlet conduit means extending down wardly within the chamber, means to supply said chamber with a liquid from a point substantially below said outlet conduit, and suction means associated with the outlet and operative to raise said liquid in the chamber by suction and at least partially to submerge said conduit means within said liquid and to withdraw said liquid through said conduit means, said last named means comprising a plurality of vertically spaced gas admission means arranged along a substantial longitudinal extent thereof, and means for conducting a how of treatment gas to said chamber.

5. In a gas mixing and dispensing device, a chamber, outlet conduit means extending downwardly within the chamber, means to supply said chamber with a liquid from apoint substantially below said outlet conduit, and suction means associated with the outlet and operative to raise said liquid in the chamber by suction and at least partially to submerge said conduit means within said liquid and to withdraw said liquid through said conduit means, said last named means comprising a plurality of vertically spaced gas admis-- sion means arranged along a substantial longitudinal extent thereof, and means for conducting a flow of treatment gas to said chamber, said flow of gas being adjustable whereby to vary the eflective suction within said chamber for uncovering said gas admission means in response to the said rate of gas flow.

6. In a liquid and gas contact device, a chamber having means for supplying liquid thereto, outlet means in said chamber and extending downwardly a substantial distance, said outlet means being connected with a source of suction to create a suction in said chamber and to raise said liquid at least to said outlet means, said outlet means being provided with vertically spaced restrictive gas admission means, and

means for adding a controlled flow of treatment gas to said chamber, the rate of gas flow into said outlet means being controlled by the extent oi. submergence of said downwardly-extending out-' let means within said liquid.

7. A system for treating a liquid with a gas and comprising a gas control element and a gas measuring element, means for controllabiy admixing said gas with the flow of liquid, and dehydrating means communicating with said control and measuring elements intercepting the flow of gas thereby to remove moisture from said gas at all times to maintain said elements in dry condition.

8. In a liquid and gas contact device, means for feeding and controlling a gas, means for measuring the flow of said gas, conduit means for supplying said gas to a tower for treatment with moisture, and a drying cartridge interposed in said conduit intermediate said measuring means and said tower and being adapted to protect the gas supplying means from contact with moisture.

9. In gas mixing and dispensing system of the class described adapted for use with chlorine gas or the like, a gas flow measuring device comprising a tube having a bore of varying diameter, means for passing a supply of gas into said tube, means for conducting the gas from said tube to a water containing tower, a chamber interposed in said last named means, and a cartridge containing a moisture absorbing agent, said cartridge being removably disposed within said chamber and being adapted to protect said tube from contact with moisture.

10. In a gas mixing and dispensing device, means for conducting a main liquid flow, suctioncreating means in said conducting means, a tower supplied with liquid and extending a substantial distance above normal liquid level, means to supply gas to said tower, a downwardly extending conduit in said tower above normal liquid level and connected to said suction-creating means, said conduit having a plurality oi inlet means spaced therealong and adapted to permit a varying liquid level in said-tower in accordance with the rate of gas supply, and check valve means located in said gas supply means for preventing flow in a direction from said tower.

ROY BLAIR EVER-SON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2637690 *Feb 11, 1950May 5, 1953Everson Roy BMeans for mixing and feeding chlorine gas
US2647083 *Jan 9, 1950Jul 28, 1953Everson Roy BMeans for direct feed automatically proportioning of chlorine gas
US2671756 *May 24, 1949Mar 9, 1954Blair Everson RoySystem for mixing a gas with a liquid
US2912995 *Dec 27, 1954Nov 17, 1959Paddock Pool Equipment CoApparatus for injecting fluids into fluid streams
US2929393 *Mar 21, 1957Mar 22, 1960Wallace & Tiernan IncGas flow control apparatus
US3292651 *Sep 18, 1963Dec 20, 1966Boris InnocentiGas flow controlling device
US3370753 *Jun 2, 1966Feb 27, 1968Universal Match CorpPlural source fluid dispenser
US4298017 *Feb 4, 1980Nov 3, 1981Poly-Glas SystemsAutomatic fluid component shut off system
US5070901 *Apr 12, 1990Dec 10, 1991Cashco, Inc.Pressure regulating valve apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/114, 137/544, 137/850, 137/505
International ClassificationC02F1/76, B01F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationC02F1/763, B01F3/04985
European ClassificationC02F1/76E, B01F3/04P