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Publication numberUS2315595 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1943
Filing dateJan 16, 1941
Priority dateJan 16, 1941
Publication numberUS 2315595 A, US 2315595A, US-A-2315595, US2315595 A, US2315595A
InventorsAndrew Chappory
Original AssigneeNat Biscuit Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display rack
US 2315595 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April A. CHAPPORY 2,315,595

DISPLAY RACK Filed Jan. 16, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet l April 6, 1943. A. CHAPPORY DISPLAYRACK 2 R Y um mR/i e w NM 9 C A m S W 3 M m w Filed Jan. .16, 1941 April 6, "1943. AAAAAAAA RY 2,3 ,595

DISPLAY RAcK Patented Apr. 6, 1943 DISPLAY RACK Andrew Chappory, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignor to National Biscuit Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application January 16, 1941, Serial No. 374,628

11 Claims.

My invention relates to display racks and has for its principal object to provide a rack for the effectual display of small packages of merchandise in stores, and particularly in stores of the self-service type.

At the present time, the trend in small packages, particularly in the case of food products, is toward wrapping the articles with transparent wrappers or placing them in transparent bags, as Cellophane, so that the contents may be seen and inspected by the purchaser. The packages usually are of such size as to retail for 5, or cents each. Heretofore, such packages have been displayed by stacking them on counters, in bins, or on shelves, but this is not entirely satisfactory because much of the inherent advantage of visibility is lost, which loss promotes excessive handling, which in turn causes crumbling of the products within the packages. This in turn results in unsightliness and an apparent staleness of the products that offsets the sales advantage of the transparent wrapping or bag.

Special display racks of many kinds have been devised for displaying this class of merchandisc, but they have not been entirely satisfactory for many reasons among which are large size, costliness, visibility on one side only, excessive weight, and other disadvantages. Having these disadvantages in mind and also the desirability of effecting a good display of the merchandise from all angles of approach and to minimize the handling of the packages, I have invented my present display rack.

The rack preferably is made in knock-down or collapsible form so that it occupies very little space in shipment, It is made from metal rods or wires welded together so that it is light in weight. yet strong and durable, and of low cost. Because of its open-work character, the merchandise is visible from all angles and the rack is of very large capacity for the floor space occupied. It can be assembled easily and quickly without the use of tools of any kind. Because of its open character it cannot catch or hold dirt or fragments of articles, and therefore is always clean and sanitary. It is of pleasing design and can be finished in any color or com bination of colors to harmonize with or in con trast to other fixtures or store decorations. It particularly advantageous in self-service stores where customers may pick up packages that at tract their attention while passing by.

In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated three embodiments of my invention that are intended primarily for displaying bakery products, as biscuit, crackers, cookies, wafers, cakes and the like, that are packaged in transparent wrappings or bags. However, the racks shown are not limited to this use but may be used for many purposes, nor is the invention limited to the forms shown which are but illustrative thereof.

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the side frames and spacer-bars of one form of rack, with the parts separated but occupying the same relative positions that they do in the assembled rack.

Fig. 2 shows the parts of Fig. l assembled ready to receive the shelves and back-rests.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a shelf or backrest the two being of identical construction.

Fig. 4 shows the complete rack.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view, taken substantially on the line 55, showing how the shelves and back-rests interlock with the frames.

Figs. 6 and '7 are detail views of a modified form, in which the U-shaped loops or tongues, that co-operate with the spacer-bars, are formed in the plane of the side frames.

Fig. 8 is a further modification in which the back-rests form part of a back frame whichis hinged to the rear uprights of the side frames and the shelves are hinged to the back frame.

Fig. 9 is a detail view of the hinged connections of Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 shows a smaller size rack, of slightly modified form, designed for counter or table disp ay.

Fig. 11 is an enlarged detail view 'ofa of Fig. 10.

I have illustrated a preferred form of my in vention in Figs. 1 to 5. As shown in Fig. 1, the display rack consists of two side frames 1 and 2 which are identical except that they are complementary or rights and lefts. Each side frame is formed from heavy wires or rods welded together to form an integral member.

part

A single piece rod is used to form the outline or main part of the frame and is bent to form a rear upright 55, a forwardly and downwardly extending top bar 4, a front upright 5 and a base 3. The base preferably is bent upward at 1 so that it has a two-point support on the floor at B, 5. The part of the rod forming the base eX- tends beyond the upright 3 and is then bent upward and forward and welded to the upright 3 as shown at if). The lower end of the upright 3 also is welded to the base between the two points of support 8, 9, and preferably at the raised point 7.

A number of cross-bars H, !2 and i3, corre-v spending to the number of shelves to be provided in the rack, are welded at the opposite ends to the uprights 3 and 5. A retaining bar i l, [5, l6 likewise is welded to the two uprights a short distance above the cross-bars or shelf supports H,

Each cross-bar has formed integrally with it or welded to it a U-shaped tongue ll, l8, l9, these tongues on the two shelves facing inwardly or toward each other when the rack is assembled.

A similar U-shaped tongue 28 is welded to the front upright adjacent to the lower crossbar IL While I have shown this tongue 23 as a separate piece it may be formed by continuing the cross-bar H and bending it so as to form the U. A similar U-shaped tongue or' loop 2i is welded to the base-bar adjacent the point where it is welded to the lower end of the rear upright 3.

A number of sheet metal spacer-bars 22, 2'4, 25, 26 are provided to fit over the tongues I! to 2!. These bars are shown as made from sheet metal with the edges rolled inwardly so as to provide a snug fit over the U-tongues, but they may be made from rods or wires similar to those shown in Figs. 6 and '7.

Fig. 1 shows the side frames and spacer-bars in the relative positions that they assume in the assembled frame. Each spacer-bar fits over two of the U-shaped tongues, one on each of the side frames. Fig. 2 shows the side frames and spacerbars, the ends of which abut the rod or part of the frame to which the U-tongues are welded. These spacer-bars prevent the side frames from being forced inwardly.

It will be noted that the lower ends of the uprights 3 and 5 are substantially vertical and then the uprights slant or bend toward the rear so that the upper end of the rear upright is almost vertically above the rear end 9 of the base. The cross-bars ll, [2, [3 are substantially perpendicular to the uprights 3 and 5 so that they slant downwardly toward the rear. The angle that the cross-bars make with the horizontal is not the same in all instances but will be varied with the character of the merchandise that is to be displayed and with the distance that the cross-bar, or the shelf supported on it, is above the floor or counter on Which the rack may stand. Usually each retainer-bar l4, l5, will be parallel to its associated cross-bar and serves to prevent articles placed on the shelf from falling off the end of the rack.

Wire shelves as shown in Fig. 3 are provided for supporting the merchandise on the rack. There is one shelf for each cross-bar H, [2, I13, in this case three, but the rack may be made with any number of shelves.

As shown in Fig. 3, these shelves are made from rods and wires welded together so as to form an open shelf that will not retain dust, dirt and small particles, yet will hold packages of articles that are to be displayed. Each shelf consists of front and rear rods 21, 28 to which the cross-wires 29 are welded. The wires 29 preferably are welded to the underside of the bars 27, The ends of the rods 21, 28 preferably are offset downwardly at each end a distance substantially equal to the thickness of the cross-wires 29 as shown at 38. Beyond the off-set, each bar is bent to form a hook, 3 I, adapted to engage over the cross-bar on which the shelf rests. As shown in 5, the point of the hook is bent in slightly at 32 so that at this point the distance between the two hooks on each bar is very slightly less than the distance between two opposite cross-bars as l2, it, so that the shelves will be snapped into place over the cross-bars. As clearly shown in Figs. i and 5, when the shelves are in place on the cross-bars, the off-set ends of the front and rear rods rest on the cross-bars and the cross-wires at rest on the co-operating spacer-bar.

In order to prevent the merchandise from sliding rearwardly on the inclined shelves, I provide back-rests which are duplicates of the shelves. These back-rests are put in place by snapping the hooks 3i over the rear uprights 3 as clearly shown in Fig. 4.

While all of the shelves and baclorests may be identical, I may extend two or more of the crosswires on the shelf, as shown at 33, 34, Fig. 4, to support a name plate, trade marl: or other device or legend 35. In practice I have used the words Self-service on this plate.

The spacer-bars 22 to 25 are all alike but the lower front spacer-bar 23 provides a panel that may carry the manufacturers name, the name of the product being sold or other advertising matter.

As shown in 4, I provide a wire frame or rack 36 adapted to carry an advertising card or other display 32'. This frame is made from a single piece of heavy wire or red having hooks 38, at the two lower ends which engage under the lower bar of the top back-rest and which have offsets Gi that are sprung over the top bar of the same back-rest. The bar then extends above the back-rest and across its top is provided with two or more loops or clamps 4-3 adapted to hold the advertising card 3's.

In Figs. 6 and '7, I have shown a slightly modified form of the side frames. It will be noted in Fig. 1 that the U-shaped tongues extend laterally from the side frames. This increases the width of the frames in dissembled form and requires a carton of considerable lateral dimensions to package the frame when it is knocked-down, ready for shipment. As shown in Fig. 6, the U-tongues lie in the plane of the uprights 3, 5 so that when the rack is packed, ready for shipment it can be placed in a much smaller carton. This affects a big saving in package material and in space necessary for shipment or storage. In Figs. 6 and 7 only one of the U-tongues is selected for illustration and this is assumed to be the tongue corresponding to H in Fig. 1 and I have indicated it by H and its cross-bar as l I.

With the U-tongues formed in the plane of the side frames, 2. modification of the spacer-bars is required. The spacer-bars used with this form of tongue may be formed from two wires or rods i l, 25 having upwardly bent ends 36, 4? to which the two eyes or loops it, 59 are welded. These eyes preferably are made open on one side and fit closely over the U-tongues ll. Only one end of the spacer-bar is illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 but both ends are identical.

As shown in Fig. '7, the shelves used in connection with this modified form of invention are identical with those shown in Fig. 3 and the crosswires 29 and are supported by the rods 44, 45.

By leaving the eyes 68, 59 open on one side, the unsecured ends may be bent inwardly to clamp tightly against the tongues II in case they fit too loosely, or they may be sprung outwardly so as to slide easily over the tongues ii" in case that is necessary in assembling the rack.

In Figs. 10 and 11, I show a rack that is particularly adapted for counter display. It consists of two side frames, spacer-bars, shelves and backrests similar to Fig. 4, but differs in some details of construction. However, the differences in details of construction are not limited to the small size of rack but the same differences may be embodied in the large rack of Fig. 4, and conversely the structural features of Fig. 4 may be embodied in the small size counter display rack.

Referring now to Fig. 10, each of the side frames has a rear upright 50 from the upper end of which there is a forwardly and downwardly extending top bar leading to the front upright 52, at the lower end of which there is a rearwardly extending base 53 which is bent upwardly near its center at 54 to provide feet 55, 56 that rest upon the counter or other support. Beyond the foot 56 the rod is bent upward and forward and welded to the rear upright at 5'1 similar to that shown in Fig. 1. The lower end of the rear upright is welded to the base at the raised point 54 or at any point between the feet 55, 55. Cross-bars 58. 59 are welded to the uprights 50, 52 and above these are the retaining-bars 60, 6! which similarly are welded to the two uprights.

The lower cross-bar 58 may be bent where it is welded to the front upright 52 to form the U-shaped tongue 62, or this tongue may be a separate piece welded to the upright.

Similarly, the cross-bar 59 may be bent down ward and inward adjacent the rear upright 58 to form a U-shaped tongue 63 as shown in Fig. 11

or the tongue may be a separate piece welded to the upright 50. A spacer-bar 64 engages over the two tongues 62 and a similar bar 65 engages over the two tongues 63 to hold the two side frames in spaced relation.

The shelves and back-rests are similar to that shown in Fig. 3 but differ somewhat in detail. Each shelf has three longitudinal bars or rods 66, 51, G8 to which the cross-wires 69 are welded. The outer ends of the longitudinal rods are bent up and then downward to form hooks 10, Fig. 11, which at the throat H are slightly less than the diameter of the cross-bars so that when the hooks are snapped down over the bars 58, 59 they will restrain side frames against both inward and outward movement as shown in Figs. 10 and 11. The back-rests are made the same as the shelves and the hooks Hi snap over the rear uprights 5!].

In assembling the rack as shown in Figs. 10 and 11, the two side frames are first assembled with the spacer-bars M, 65 by inserting the tongues 62, 63 in the opposite ends of the respective bars. Next the shelves will be snapped over the side bars 58. 59 and then the hooks of the back-rests are snapped over the rear uprights 5!]. r

This locks the side frames securely together and the rack can then be placed upon the counter or table and the shelves filled with merchandise. The lower spacer-bar 84 maybe used as an advertisement or may carry the name of the manufacturer of the rack or the products to be sold.

As shown in Fig. 10, the spacer-bars 64, 65, whether made of sheet metal or rods, are somewhat shorter than the width of the rack so that their ends do not abut the side frames. But in cases where the hooks l0 engage over or hold the cross-bars 53, 55, on one side only, like the hooks 30, the spacer-bars E4. 65 will be made long enough to bear against the side frames.

In Figs. 8 and 9, I have illustrated another form of my invention in which the side frames, the back and the shelves are hinged together in such manher that the entire frame may be folded flat for packaging and shipping.

This rack comprises two side frames ll, 12, a

till

back frame 13 and a number of shelves 14, all of the shelves being identical in construction.

Each side frame is made from a rod which forms a rear upright 15 and a front upright 16 which are connected at the top by an inclined bar 11 and at the lower end by a base '18 which is bent upward intermediate its ends at 19 to provide feet Bil, 8| which rest upon the floor. The rod extends upward and forward from the foot 8| to point 82 where it is welded to the rear upright. The rod may end at this point or it may be bent forward and welded to the front upright at 83, the horizontal part of the rod between uprights 82, 83 forming a cross-bar 84 on the frame. A similar cross-bar 85 is welded to the front and rear uprights near the top and a lower cross-bar 86 is welded to the two uprights near the bottom and may extend rearwardly and be welded to the frame at 81. Retainer-bars 8B, 89 and 90 are welded to the front and rear uprights adjacent the several cross-bars.

The back frame has vertical side bars SI, 92 which at their lower ends are welded to a hori zontal bar 93, the ends of which extend beyond the vertical bars and are bent to form eyes 94, $35 around the lower ends of the rear uprights. The upper ends of the vertical bars are welded to a horizontal bar 96 the ends of which form eyes 91, 53 around the rear uprights at the top. An intermediate horizontal bar 99 is welded to the two vertical bars and has eyes i510, HH bent around the rear uprights. The bar 99 preferably is located at such a point that the eyes I09, it! will rest upon the top of the cross-bars 84.

It will be noted that the rear uprights are straight and that the several eyes 94. m8, and 9'! on the one side and 95, Hi! and 98 on the other side provide hinged connections about which the two side frame members may be turned so as to lie flat against the back frame or turned out to stand at right angles thereto in assembled position'as shown in Fig. 8. The back frame may be d and strengthened by stiffening bars left. nd which are welded to the hc1'i-- zonial rods 59 and where they cross.

All the shelves are identical in construction and each consists cf a front bar or rod 495 and a rear bar 56 to which the cross-wires it! are welded. Two or more of the crossavircs, preferably one at each end and one in the center, are made of heavier wire and extend beyond the rear bar where each is bent to an eye iGS around one of the intermediate horizontal rods 99. This hinges each of the shelves to he back frame so that the shelves may be folded fiat against the back frame or may extend forwardly as shown in Fig. 8.

Each of the front shelf bars 5 extends beyond the end of the shelf where it is bent to form hooks H19 which fit over the respective cross-bars 8d, 85. B5 to support the front of the shelves and to hold the side frames from collapsing. As best shown in Fig.9 these hooks we embrace the cross-bars on both sides and prevent movement of the side frames in either direction.

Some of the cross-wires on the shelves be extended to support a name plate i if or I l I similar to the name plate 35 shown in Fig. 4.

While I have shown the side frames in Figs. l, 8 and 10 as slightly different in construction, the same or similar construction may be employed in forming the side frames in any of the modifications illustrated, and none of them is limited to any one form. Similarly, while I have shown the shelves with the same inclination in Figs. 4 and.

10, the cross-bars may be arranged so as to give a different slant to the shelves at different elevations, depending upon the articles to be displayed. In Fig. 8, I have shown the lower shelf as having a greater inclination than the two upper shelves but this is only for purposes of illustration and the upper shelves may have a greater inclination when it is found desirable to do so or all may be arranged to stand at the same slope.

The back-rests shown in Fi 8 consist of parallel bars or rods H2 welded to the back frame above each of the shelves. But these back-rests may be detachable members similar to the shelves shown in 3, but this form of frame is more rigid when the back-rests formed integral with it.

Having thus described and illustrated how my invention may be embodied in display racks, I claim all modifications and equivalents thereof that may come within the scope of my claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a display rack, a pair of side frames each havin front and rear upright bars and spaced horizontal cross-bars connecting the front and rear bars, a U-shaped tongue on each cross-bar, hofizontal spacer-bars, each spacer-bar at one end having a sliding fit over one of the U-shaped tongues n one side frame and at its other end having a sliding fit over the corresponding tongue on the other side frame, whereby said spacerbars hold said side frames in spaced apart relation, and shelves resting on said crossbar, each having hooks at one end engaging over a bar on one side frame and at the opposite end having hooks engaging over the corresponding cross-bars on the other side frame, whereby said shelves lock said side frames against outward separation.

2. In a display rack, a pair of side frames; each side frame being made from a single rod bent to form front and rear uprights, an inclined top bar connecting the tops of the uprights, a base bar connecting the lower ends of the uprights and extending rearwardly beyond the rear upright, the rearward extension of the base bar being one end of the said single red and bent upwardly and forwardly and welded to said rear upright, the lower end of the rear upright being the other end of the rod and welded to said base bar intermediate its ends; cross-bars welded to said front and rear uprights, shelves resting on said cross-bars and having end hooks engaging over the respective cross-bars and holding the frames against outward movement, and spacer bars detachably connected at opposite ends to the respective side frames to hold them against inward movement.

3. In a display rack, a pair of side frames, each made from a rod bent to form front and rear uprights, an inclined top bar connecting the tops of the uprights. a base bar connecting the lower ends of the uprights and extending rearwardly beyond the rear upright, the extension of the base being bent upwardly and forwardly and welded to said rear upright, the lower end of the rear upright being welded to said base bar intermediate its ends, cross-bars welded to said front and rear uprights, U-shaped tongues on each side frame, horizontal spacer-bars, one end of each spacer bar fitting over a U-shaped tongue on one side frame and the opposite end of each spacerbar fitting over a corresponding tongue on the other side frame, and shelves resting on said crossbars and having end hooks engaging over the respective cross-bars.

a. In a display rack, a pair of side frames, each made from a rod bent to form front and rear uprights, an inclined top bar connecting the tops of the upri hts, a base bar connecting the lower ends of the uprights and extending rearwardly beyond the rear upright, the extension of the base being bent upwardly and forwardly and welded to said rear upright, the lower end of the rear upright being welded to said base bar intermediate its ends, cross-bars welded to said front and rear uprights, U-shaped tongues on each cross-bar, horizontal spacer-bars extending between said frames and at their opposite ends fitting over the tongues on the respective crossbars, shelves resting on said spacer-bars and cross-bars and having hooks at each end engaging over opposite cross-bars.

5. In a display rack, a pair of side frames, each made from a rod bent to form front and rear uprights, an inclined top bar connecting the tops of the uprights, a base bar connecting the lower ends of the uprights and extending rearwardly beyond the rear upright, the extension of the base being bent upwardly and forwardly and welded to said rear upright, the lower end of the rear upright being welded to said base bar intermediate its ends, cross-bars welded to said front and rear uprights, shelves resting on said crossbars and having end hooks engaging over the respective cross-bars, and a back rest adjacent the rear edge of each shelf and having hooks at each end engaging over the rear uprights.

6. In a display rack, a pair of side frames, each made from a rod bent to form front and rear uprights, an inclined top bar connecting the tops of the uprights, a base bar connecting the lower ends of the uprights and extending rearwardly beyond the rear upright, the extension of the base being bent upwardly and forwardly and welded to said rear upright, the lower end of the rear upright being welded to said base bar intermediate its ends, cross-bars welded to said front and rear uprights, shelves resting on said crossbars and having end hooks engaging over the respective cross-bars, a retainer-bar welded at opposite ends to the front and rear uprights above each cross-bar, and a back rest adjacent the rear edge of each shelf and having hooks at each end engaging over the rear uprights.

'7. An integral side frame for a display rack comprising a rod bent to form in succession starting at one end a rear upright, an inclined top bar, a front upright and a base, the base extending rearwardly from the lower end of the front upright beyond the rear upright, the base being bent upwardly intermediate its ends and welded to the lower end of the rear upright, the rod continuing beyond the base being bent upward and forward welded to the rear upright intermediate its ends; cross-bars welded at opposite ends to the uprights; and retaine bars welded to the uprights above the crossbars.

8. An integral side frame for a dispiay rack comprising a rod bent to form a rear upright, an inclined top bar, a front upright and a base extending rearwardly from the lower end of the front upright beyond the rear upright, he base being bent upwardly intermediate its and welded to the lower end of the rear upright, the extension of the base being bent upward and forward and welded to the rear upright intermediate its ends; cross-bars welded at opposite ends to the uprights; retainer-bars Welded to the up rights above the cross-bars, said cross-bars having U-shaped tongues formed therein.

9. In a display rack, a pair of side frames each having a number of cross-bars extending from front to rear, a U-shaped tongue formed on each cross-bar, spacer-bars having their opposite ends fitting over corresponding tongues on the two frames to hold them spaced apart, and shelves having hooks at their opposite ends engaging over the cross-bars on the respective frames to pre vent their spreading.

10. In a display rack, a pair of side frames each having front and rear upright bars and spaced horizontal cross-bars connecting the front and rear bars, U-shaped tongues on each cross-bar projecting laterally toward the opposite frame, spacer-bars for holding said side frames spaced apart, one end of each spacer-bar fitting over a tongue on one side frame and the other end of each spacer-bar fitting over a corresponding tongue on the other side frame, and shelves resting on said cross-bars and spacer bars and having hooks engaging over said cross-bars to hold said frames from spreading.

11. In a display rack, a pair of side frames each having front and rear uprights connected by spaced cross-bars, each cross-bar having a U- shaped tongue, spacer-bars, the opposite ends of the spacer-bars fitting over opposite U-shaped tongues on the cross-bars, shelves supported at their ends on the opposite cross-bars of the frames and having hooks at each end engaging over the respective cross-bars.

ANDREW CHAPPORY.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/186, D07/409, 211/149
International ClassificationA47F5/10, A47F5/13
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/13
European ClassificationA47F5/13