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Publication numberUS2315931 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1943
Filing dateJun 17, 1940
Priority dateJun 17, 1940
Publication numberUS 2315931 A, US 2315931A, US-A-2315931, US2315931 A, US2315931A
InventorsBurt Clarence E, Ragan Thomas M, Theodore Sutter
Original AssigneeBaker Oil Tools Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liner hanger apparatus
US 2315931 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 6, 1943.

C. E. BURT ETAL LINER HANGER APPARATUS Filed June 1'7, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Ap 6, 1943. c. E. BURT Erm.

LINER HANGER APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 17, 1940 ,M MJ@ @im M 55M. W. EE 4 of 3 l 725 @an d 7 777 .AE ann Ap 6, 1943. c. E. BURT 'ET AL LINER HANGER APPARATUS s Smets-sheet s Filed June 1'7, 1940 4 E Agay a 2 5 6 www@ @we @Mmm 1 z J Patented Apr. 6, 1943 LINER HANGER APPARATUS Clarence E. Burt, Los Angeles, Theodore Sutter, Huntington Park, and Thomas M. Bagan, Downey, Calif., assignors to Baker Oil Tools, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of Caliiornia Application June 17, 1940, Serial No. 340,984

(Cl. 16S-1) 37 Glaims.

This invention relates to well packers, and more particularly to liner hangers and the associated mechanisms for producing their setting in a well casing.

A liner hanger of the retrievabletype is restrained against downward movement in a well casing by the weight of a depending liner holding its anchoring elements firmly engaged with the wall of the casing. The requirement of retrievability has resulted in the omission of any provision for preventing displacement of the liner hanger in an upward direction. As a result, pressures and other forces acting from below tend to elevate the hanger and its depending liner in the casing, limiting the extent of operations that can be performed successfully with such equipment. The performance of high pressure squeeze cementing operations around the liner and its connected hanger, or their subjection to high l production pressures, has often resulted in the pumping or forcing of the apparatus up the casing away from their initial location therewithin.

It is an object ofthe present invention to provide an improved retrievable well packer, especially adapted for use as a liner hanger, which can be anchored against displacement in both an upward and downward direction.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved liner hanger apparatus capable of being set in packed-off condition within a well casing prior to the introduction of circulation through and behind a depending liner, for the purpose of washing the hole and conditioning the mud therein, enabling the proper performance of a displacement or squeeze cementing operation to take place. In this connection, cement slurry can be deposited behind the liner after the hanger has been packed-oir in the casing, the displaced cement slurry then being subjected to a squeeze or pressure through the use of the liner hanger, setting mechanism.

Still a further object of the invention involvesan improved well packer and tool for hydraulically setting the packer in a well casing, the setting tool being hydraulically releasable from the set packer for removal from the casing.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved method for cementing a liner in a well bore.

This invention has other objects that will become apparent from a consideration of the embodiment shown in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. This form will now be described in detail, but it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limited sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figures 1 and la constitute a two part, longitudinal section through a well casing, showing the liner hanger, its setting tool, and associated apparatus in running-in position within a well casing; v

Figure 2 is a transverse section taken along the line 2 2 in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a transverse section taken along the line 3-3 in Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 1, disclosing the hydraulic actuation of the slips to casing engaging position;

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional and elevational view of part of the setting tool;

Figure 6 isa longitudinal section illustrating the liner hanger set in packed-off condition in the casing, with its setting tool released therefrom; and

Figure 7 is 'a view similar to Figure 3, with the setting tool removed from' the liner hanger.

As shown in the drawings, the liner hanger A consists of a tubular main body I0 of steel or vother suitable material having a sub I I threaded on its lower end, to which is attached a depending liner B. The body carries a plurality of segmental down-pressure slips I2 normally held in retracted position by shear screws I3 extending through each slip into the body. The slips are engageable with a lower expander cone I4 whose downwardly converging tapered surface I4a is adapted to slide along the companion tapered surfaces on the slips I2 to shift themradially into contact with the casing C and to hold them wedged thereagainst with their wickers I5 digging into the casing wall. This expander cone I4 is slidable on the main body I0 of the packer and is initially held thereon in retracted position by one or more shear screws I6. A third set of shear screws I'I connects the cone with the upper ends of the slips. The screws I6 holding the cone expander to the body have a lower shear strength than the screws I3 fastening the slips to the body, and the latter screws have a lower shear value than the screws I1 securing the ycone and slips together.

A sleeve I8 of lead or any other suitable packing material surrounds the body with its lower end engaging the upper end of the expander cone I4. This engagement occurs along a downwardly and inwardly inclined surface I9 to coniine the bottom end of the lead seal packing against inadvertent displacement, while the upper end is received within a V-shaped groove 20 formed in the lower portion of a retainer thrust ring 2l slldable on the packer body. This thrust ring is secured to an elastic or rubber packing sleeve 22 by the respective interlocking flanges 23, 24, the upper end of the sleeve 22 being similarly coupled to an upper retainer ring 25 abutting a shoulder 26 on an enlarged portion 21 of the body I0. The upper ring 25 is held against downward movement by a screw 28 extending through the ring into the body.

When the well packer A is to be set in the casing, fluid under pressure will e'nter the rubber packing sleeve 22 through the ports or openings 29 in the body, to expand the sleeve against the casing C and produce its elongation in a downward direction (see Figure 4). As the sleeve is stretched downwardly, it moves the retainer thrust ring 2|, lead seal packing I8, expander cone I4 and segmental slips 'I 2 in the same direction, the lead seal packing I8 acting as a fairly rigid load transmitting member between the rubber packing 22 and cone I4. 'I'he downwardly exerted hydraulic force will shear the cone screws I6 and then the slip screws I3, the third set of screws I 1 remaining intact to hold the cone and slips together for downward movement in unison against the action of a helical spring 30 encompassing the packer body. The lower end of the spring bears against the sub I I, which has an upstanding lip 3! confining the spring against outward displacement. The upper end of the spring 30 engages a ring 32 which abuts the slips and has a depending skirt 33 conning and protecting the spring.

The skirt 33 and lip 3I are initially spaced apart, enabling downward movement in unison of the cone and slips to occur against the force exerted by the spring 30. After the skirt and lip abut, the exertion of sufcient force by the :Huid within the expansible rubber packing 22 will shear the this additional body forms a continuation of the central cylindrical passage 35 through the lower packer body. In effect, the two body parts functlon as one.

A second expander cone 36, whose' outer surface 36a converges upwardly, is mounted on the upper body portion 34 and rests upon the end 31 of the lower body portion, its upward movement being prevented by a screw 38 extending into the upper body. A plurality of segmental up-pressure slips 39 is initially held in retracted position on the upper body by a plurality of shear screws 40. The inner surfaces of these slips are companion to and engageable with the outer surface 36a of the cone expander, so that downward movement of the slips 39 over the cone surface will result in their radial displacement into engagement with the wall of the casing C.

The slips 39 are released from their retracted position by means of an elastic or rubber sleeve 4I encompassing the upper body, with its upper end secured to a retainer ring 42 abutting a shoulder or ange 43 on the secondary body 34. Downward movement of this ring is prevented by one or more screws 44 securing it to the body. The lower end of the expansible sleeve 4I is secured to a lower ring 45, and this ring is initially held in position spaced from the upper ends of the retracted slips by one or more shear screws 45 threaded into the body.

Fluid under pressure passes through one or more ports I1 in the upper body and into the rubber screws I1 holding the cone and slips together,

permitting the cone I4to move down within the slips I2 and the compressed spring 30 to expand and slide the slips I2 along the face I4a of the cone into engagement with the casing C.

After the slips contact the casing, weight imposed downwardly on the main body I0 of the packer will compress the rubber and lead packings 22, I8 between the body and casing, in addition to wedging the expander cone I4 rmly in the slips I2, causing their downwardly directed wickers I5 to be embedded securely in the wall of the casing. The packer or liner hanger A is now set in packed-01T condition within the well casing C, supporting the weightof the liner B through the cone I4 and slips I2, with leakage between the body I0 and casing C prevented by both the rubber sleeve 22 and lead sleeve I8.

The general arrangement of parts described above forms the subject matter of an invention led December 23, 1939, by one of the present joint inventors, Clarence E. Burt, for Retrievable Well packers, Serial No. 310,810, now Patent No. 2,290,142 granted July 14, 1942.

The liner hanger A just described cannot be displaced in a downward direction due to the disposition of its expander cone I4 and slips I2. However, forces acting in the'other direction may tend to shift it upwardly. To guard against this occurrence, the main body I0 of the packer is extended upwardly by threading an additional tubular body sleeve 34 into the thickened upper portion 21 of the main body. The interior passage 35a of sleeve 4I to expand it into engagement with the casing C and then produce its elongation downwardly (see Figure 4). The elongation of the upper packing sleeve 4I will shear the screws 49 holding the lower ring 45 in its initial position and move it downwardly into engagement with the upper slips 39, disrupting their retaining screws 4II and permitting them to move along the cone 36 into engagement with the casing, either under the hydraulic action of the fluid within the rubber packing 4I or solely under the action of gravity. Upon release of the pressure within the upper packing sleeve 4I, it will tend to assume its normal position retracted from engagement with the wall of the casing, with its lower retainer ring 45 removed from engagement with the slips 39 (see Figures 6 and 7) As was described-above, the lower slips I2 and cone |14 prevent displacement of the liner hanger or packer A in a downward direction. Anyupwardly directed thrusts are incapable of shifting the packer up the casing since the upper cone 35 would be wedged more securely in the slips 39 and force their upwardly facing wickers 48 more securely in the wall of the casing. Thus, it will be seen-that displacement of the packer in either direction cannot occur once it has been anchored in the casing.

In the event that it is desired to make the well packer or liner hanger A retrievable, its parts above the main body portion 21 are made of some readily drillable material, such as cast iron, aluminum alloy, or the like. The upper body portion 34, retainer rings 42, 45 and cone 36 could be made of either cast iron or an aluminum alloy,

` while it is preferred that the slips 39 be made of and cone 36.- 'Ihe drilled particles are removable to the surface of the well bore by the circulating fluid used in the drilling operations. Upon removal of this upper section, the liner will still remain in its initial set position suspended from the casing by the lower slips I2. A suitable flshing tool can then be lowered in the casing for the purpose of grasping the remaining portions of the liner hanger A and removing it together with its depending liner B as a unit from the well casing C.

The above-describedhanger A with its depnding liner B is lowered in the casing on the end of a tubular string D threaded to the body 49 of a setting tool E coupled to the main body I of the liner hanger. This settingtool not only serves to couple the liner hanger to the tubular string, but also governs the passage of fluid under pressure into the upper and lower expansible packing members 22, 4| to produce their elongation and the setting of the slips i2, 29.

The body 49 of the setting tool is provided with an upper threaded box 50 for attachment to the end of the tubularstring D, and with a lower male end I on which is threaded a sub 52 having a bottom end 53 of reduced diameter adapted to be coupled to a. string of tubing F, for a purpose which will be described later. The main body 49 carries a plurality of latches 54 pivotally mounted on hinge pins 55 within radial slots 56 extending completely through the wall of the body (see Figure 5). In order to relieve the pins of the load imposed upon the latches, the pivot opening 51 through each latch is elongated, allowing bodily displacement of the latches 54 to a limited degree in both longitudinal directions. Upwardly directed thrusts on the latches are not transmitted to the hingepins themselves but to blocks 58 welded or otherwise secured in the upper ends of the slots 56, having curved seats 59 adapted to receive companion portions formed at the upper ends of each latch. Similarly, downwardly directed forces imposed on the latches will engage their bottom ends with the bottoms 66 of the slots, transmitting the loads to the body 49 without their imposition on the hinge pins 55 themselves. In short, the hinge pins 55 serve merely as fulcrums for the latches, with very little if any load being imposed upon them. One of the latches 54 and slots 56 have been disclosed in Figure 5 as displaced from the position shown in the other gures solely for purposes of illustration and clarity. It is apparent that the number of latches and cooperable slots can be Varied without departing from the invention.

Each latch 54 has a locking dog 6i adapted to extend outwardly from its confining slot 56 for reception within an internal circumferential groove 62 formed in the main body. The cooperation between the inwardly dlverging sides 63 of this groove and the corresponding ends 64 of the locking dogs serves to couple the setting tool the engagement of the inner surfaces 65 of thel hinge pins inwardly to free their dogs 6I from the confines of the groove 62.

The sleeve 69 is retained in its uppermost position to hold the locking dogs within the groove by means of a shear screw 16 extending through the setting tool body 49 into the upper end of the sleeve. This position is determined by the abutting of the upper terminus of the sleeve with a cap screw 1| extending through the body into its passage 61. The shear screw 10 is adapted to be fractured by hydraulic pressure'to shift the sleeve 66 downwardly until its reduced diameter portion 69 is opposite the slots 56, whereupon the latches 54 may be retracted from the body groove. A common or mutual arrangement is employed for shifting the sleeve 66 downwardly, and for controlling the passage of fluid under pressure to the expansible packings 22, 4l for setting the slips l2, 39 in engagement with the casing C.

The hydraulic tripping mechanism includes the aforementioned sleeve 66 slidable within the setting tool body 49. This sleeve is provided with spaced packing rings 12, 13, 14 forced outwardly into slidable sealing engagement with the cylindrical interior 61 of the body by being confined within V-shaped grooves 15 in the exterior of the sleeve. The uppermost and intermediate rings 14, 13 are on opposite sides of the reduced sleeve portion 69, with the intermediate and lowerrnost rings 13, 12 positioned on opposite sides of one or more ports or openings 16 extending completely through the wall of the sleeve 66. These ports 16 are initially closed by a slide valve 11 held across their entrance openings by a shear screw 18 extending through the sleeve into the valve.'

The closed position of this valve 11 is determined by its abutting a stop pin 19 extending through the sleeve slightly into its passage 80.

With the setting tool E assembled in the packer A, the complete apparatus is lowered to its proper position within a well casing. A tripping ball 8| is lowered, pumped, or allowed to gravitate down through thetubular string until it engages the tripping ball seat 82 at the upper end of the slide valve 11. Such engagement will prevent further passage of fluid through the tubular string and body, enabling sufficient fluid pressure to be built up therein to shear the screw 18 and force the valve 11 downwardly clear of the ports 16 through the tripping sleeve, until it is arrested by a stop ring 83 threaded into the lower end of the tripping sleeve. Pressure of a higher degree than is necessary to 4shear the valve screw 18 can now be imposed upon the fluidwithin the tubularstring 'and setting tool, this fluid passing through the tripping sleeve ports 16 and through the slots 56 or bodyports 56a, from where it can pass through y the annular space 84 between the exterior of the latches with the exterior of a sleeve 66 slidable i and into the expansible sleeves 22, 4|

setting tool body 49 and the`wall of the packer body I6, 34, through the packer body ports 29, 41 These sleeves will first be expanded into engagement with the casing and thenelongated downwardly to shear the Various screws and move the slips into anchoring engagement with the wall of the casing, in the manner described above and as shown in Figure 4.

The fluid is confined for passage through the space 84 between the setting tool body and the packer body by the opposed packing seals 85, 86, the upper ones 85 being positioned above the upper ports 41, and the lower ones 86 below the lower ports 29 through the packer body. These packings 85, 86 prevent leakage between the setting tool body 49 and the packer body I0, 34, while the round packing seals 12, 13, 14 carried by the sleeve on opposite sides of the latch slots 56 and reduced sleeve portion 69 prevent fluid leakage between the tripping sleeve and the setting tool body.

After the slips l2, 39 have been engaged with the casing. weight can be imposed upon the well packer body I6 by setting down on the tubular string D to compress the lower rubber packing sleeve 22 and lead sleeve I8 into engagement with the casing C. Following this operation, the setting tool E is releasable from the body by building up suilcient pressure within the tripping sleeve 66 to shear the screw 18 holding it to the setting tool body 49. This latter screw has a greater shear value than the slide valve screw 18 in order that setting of the packer can be accomplished before the latches 54 are released.

As soon as the tripping sleeve shear screw 10 has been disrupted, the sleeve will be moved downwardly by the uid under pressure to an extent limited by the stop pin 81 extending across the bottom sub 52, to position its reduced cylindrical portion 69 opposite the latches 54. An upvalve sleeve 11 is first inserted within the trip- ;v

ping sleeve 66 through its bottom end until it abuts the stop pin 19 extending inwardly from the sleeve. The shear screw 18 is then inserted in place and the stop ring 83 threaded in the bottom end of the sleeve. This assembled tripping sleeve 66 with its seals 12, 13, 14 in position is-next placed within the setting tool body 49 with its lower end resting on the stop pin 81 in the sub 52, in order to position its reduced diameter 69 opposite the latch slots 56. The latches 54 and their dogs 6| can accordingly be retracted inwardly, allowing insertion of the setting tool within the fpacker body until its upper collar 88 engages the upper end 43 .of the packer body.

Such engagement will locate the locking dogs 6| opposite the internal groove 62 in the body l0. The cap screw 1| or other stop element is then threaded into the setting tool body, and a hook or other suitable tool inserted within the tripping sleeve 66 for pulling it upwardly into engagement with this stop 1 I. In moving upwardly, the larger cylindrical diameter 68 of the sleeve is positioned opposite the latch slots 56 to move the locking dogs 6I into the body groove 62 and hold them in this position until the sleeve 66 is lowered hydraulically, in the manner described above. The shear screw 10 is then inserted through the collar and setting tool body into the tripping sleeve 66. The well packer A and the setting tool E are now properly assembled for running into the hole and for the setting of the tool in packed-01T condition at the desired point in the casing.

The arrangement described can be employed for the performance of other operations than the mere setting of a liner hanger in the casing. Another example of its utility is disclosed in the drawings, wherein a float shoe 8,9 is connected to the bottom end of the liner B. A tubular string F extends between the setting tool body and shoe, being -threaded to the setting tool sub 52 at one end, with its other end attached to the float shoe 89 by means of a left hand thread connection 90. An expansion Joint 9|, consisting of an inner mandrel 92 slidably splined to and telescoped within an outer cylinder 93 by means of splines 94 is included in this tubular string F, to permit movement of the setting tool E in and out of the packer body l0, 34. Suitable seals 95 are mounted on the upper end of the mandrel 92 rfor slidable engagement with the cylinder 93 to prevent leakage between the exterior and interior of the joint 9i.

For the purpose of allowing the hole to be washed and the mud conditioned after the liner hanger A has been set in packed-oil condition in the casing, one or more holes 96 are provided in the packer sub Il to permit fluid to pass through the setting tool E, its depending tubular string F, and out through the whirler shoe 89, for upward passage around the liner B, through the openings 96 in the sub and the body passage 35, 35a to the surface of the bore hole. Fluid may pass through the tubing F below the setting tool after its sleeve 66 has been tripped, since it will be noted that the ports 16 through the tripping sleeve are then positioned within the enlarged lower passage 61a in the setting tool body, with its tripping sleeve resting on its associated stop pin 81 (see Figures 6 and 7). After the packer has been set and the latches 54 released, the setting tool E may be elevated from the packer body, as shown in Figure 7, allowing circulation to occur in the manner described, with the fluid passing around the setting tool E and upper tubular string D, after moving through the packer body, passage 35, 35a.

When the sleeve 66 is in its tripped position, iiuid is incapable of passing through the latch slots 56 due to the provision of the upper seal 14 in the sleeve, which in conjunction with the intermediate sealing ring 13 is disposed on opposite sides of the slots 56 to prevent iluid passage through them in both direct-ions. Due to this disposition of packing members, the fluid is conned for movement down through both tubular strings D, F and the shoe 89, being prevented from exiting at any other point.

- After the washing and conditioning operation has occurred, the proper quantity of cement slurry can be pumped down the tubular strings -D, F and intermediate setting tool E for passage through the shoe 89 and for movement around the liner B toward the liner hanger A. 'Ihis d'splacement operation will occur with the setting tool elevated from the packer body (see Figure 7 After sufficient cement slurry has been disposed behind the liner B, the setting tooLE can again be lowered into the packer body I0, 34 to its initial position, as determined by the abutting of its collar 88 with the upper end 43 of the packer body, and the cement slurry subjected to a squeeze or pressure imposed through the fluid within the tubular strings D, F. With the sub holes 96 open, the extent of unit squeeze pressure will be limited approximately to a value equaling the weight of the running in string D, E, divided by the inside area of the liner hanger If it is desired to perform a high -pressure squeeze operation on the cement placed behind the liner B, the well packer A is lowered in the hole with tapered or other plugs 91 closing the holes 96 in the liner sub. After the liner hanger has been set in the casing in packed-0H condition, any amount of squeeze pressure can be applied to the fluid or cement slurry behind the liner, particularly since upward movement of the liner B is prevented by the upper set of slips $9 and its cooperable cone 36.

Upon completion of the displacement or squeeze cementing operation, the setting tool E can be elevated from the set well packer (see Figure '7), and the entire tubular string D, E, F rotated to the right a sufcient number of turns to unscrew the threaded end 90 of the tubular string F from the cooperable left hand' threads in the shoe 89. The entire string and setting tool D, E, F may then be elevated to the surface of the well bore.

It is also preferred to weld or otherwise secure one or more pins 98 at spaced intervals around the packer body groove62. These pins extend into the groove and cooperate with the sides of the latches 54, so that the tubular string D, E, F, liner hanger A, its depending liner B and shoe 89 can be rotated together prior to the setting of the liner hanger in the casing, in the event that such operation becomes desirable in lowering the assembled apparatus into the hole or in washing the hole before the packer has been tripped. If the groove pins 98 were not provided,

the tubular string D, E, F might rotate with respect to the liner hanger A, liner B and shoe 89, and result in the unscrewing of the loWer end 90 of the string from the shoe.

While the setting tool has been described in connection with a well packer having both upper and lower slips, it is to be understood that it will function properly in connection with a well packer embodying the lower slips only. Moreover, although specifically described as a liner hanger, the tool is capable of use for other well packer purposes, such as a production packer or cement retainer.

We claim:

l. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction, said body consisting of readily drillable material adjacent said inst-mentioned anchoring means and difiicultly drillable material adjacent said second-mentioned anchoring means.

An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, means cooperable with the upper portion of said body for anchoring it to said casing against movement in an upward direction, means coopera-blewith the lower portion of said body for anchoring it to said casing against movement in a downward direction, the upper portion of said body consisting of readily drillable material and its lower portion of diiiicultly drillable material. i

3. An apparatus of the character described including a body `adapted to be lowered in a well casing, cooperable slip and expander means carried by the upperV portion of said body for anchoring it to said casing against movement in an upward direction, cooperable slip and expander means carried by the lower'portion of said body for anchoring it to said casing against movement in a downward direction, the upper portion of said body and rst-mentioned expander means consisting of readily drillable material, and the lower portion oi said body consist-ing of diiiicultly drillable material.

4. An apparatus of the character described including a composite body adapted to be lowered in a well casing land consisting of an upper readily drillable portion and a lower diicultly drillable portion, a readily drillable conical expander mounted on said upper body portion.

' including a composite body adapted to be lowered in a well casing and consistingof an upper readily'drillable portion and a lower diiculfiy drillable portion. a readily drillable expander l having airv upwardly converging outer surface mounted on said upper bodyportion, slips having upwardly directed wickers cooperable with said expander for anchoring said body to said.

casing against movement in an upward direction, a second expander having a downwardly converging outer surface mounted on said lower ,body portion, and slips having downwardly directed wickers cooperable with said second expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction.

rial adjacent one of said anchoring means andl 6. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction, said body consisting of readily drillable matediflicultly drillable material adjacent the other of said anchoring means. A

7. An apparatus of the character described includlng a composite tubular body adapted to be lowered in a wellcasing and consisting ci an upper readily drillable portion secured to a lower steel portion, a readily drillable expander mounted on said upper body portion, slips cooperable with sa'i'd expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, a second expander mounted on said steel body portion, and slips cooperable with said second expander for anchoring said body'to said casing against movement in a downward direction.

8. An apparatusfof the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, normally retracted means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, normally retracted means for anchoring said body to said casing against movenient in a downward direction, means capable oi' elongation by fluid under pressure within said body for impeiling said irst-mentioned anchoring means into engagement with said casing,

and separate means capable of elongation byuid under pressure within said body for impelling said second-mentioned anchoring means into engagement with said casing.

9. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, cooperable slip and expander means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, cooperable slip and expander means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in adownward direction, fluid operated means for moving one of said slip means and its cooperable expander means with respect to each other to impel said slip means into engagement with said casing, and means capable of elongation by iluid under pressure within said body for moving the other of said slip means and its cooperable expander means with respect to each` other to impel said other slip means into engagement with said casing.

10. An apparatus deiined in claim 9, said lastmentioned means comprising a packing sleeve adapted to effect a seal between said body and casing.

1l. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, a conical expander mounted on said body, slips cooperable with said conical expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, a second conical expander mounted on said body, slips cooperable with said second conical expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction, fluid operated means acting directly on said firstmentioned slips for impelling them along their cooperable expander into engagement with said casing, and separate iluid operated means for moving said second conical expander along its cooperable slips` to impel them into engagement with said casing.

12. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, an expander having an upwardly converging outer surface mounted on said body, slips movable along the outer surface of. said expander into engagement with said casing, a second exincluding a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, a conical expander mounted on said body, slips cooperable with said expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, a second conical expander mounted on said body, slips cooperable with said second expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction, iluid operated means for impelling said first-mentioned slips along their cooperable expander into engagement with said casing, and means comprising a packing sleeve on said body for moving said second conical expander along its cooperable slips to impel them into engagement with said casing.

14. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, an upper conical expander mounted on said body, an upper set oi normally retracted slips cooperable with said expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, a lower conical expander mounted on said body, a lower set of normally retracted slips cooperable with said lower expander for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction, a sleeve on said body capable of elongation by fluid under pressure within said body for impelling said upper slips along their cooperable expander into engagement with the casing, and

means comprising a packing sleeve on said body capable of elongation by fluid under pressure within said body for moving said lower expander along said lower slips toimpel them into engagement with the casing.

15. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, an expander mounted on said body, slips cooperable with said expander to anchor said body to said casing, and means for moving said expander and slips with respect to each other to impel the latter into engagement with said casing comprising a sleeve capable of innation by fluid under pressure within said body and a pliable, inelastic annulus connected to said sleeve and adapted to engage both said body and casing to effect a seal therebetween.

16. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, an expander mounted on said body, slips cooperable with said expander to anchor said body to said casing, and means for moving said expander and slips with respect to each other to impel the latter into engagement with said casing comprising instrumentalities operable by fluid under pressure within said body and a pliable, inelastic annulus connected to said instrumentalities and adapted to engage both said body and casing to eiect a seal therebetween.

17. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, a generally conical expander mounted on said body, normally retracted slips cooperable with said expander for anchoring said body to said casing, a sleeve capable of elongation by fluid under pressure within said body, and a pliant, inelastic annulus connecting said sleeve and expander and adapted to effect a seal between said body and casing.

18. An apparatus of the character described including a tubular body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, a generally conical expander mounted on said body, normally retracted slips cooperable with said expander for anchoring said body to said casing, a sleeve capable of elongation by duid under pressure within said body and fixed at one end to said body, a pliant, inelastic annulus connected to the other end of said sleeve and to said expander, said sleeve and annulus adapted to eiect a seal between said body and casing, said body having a port through its wall opening into said sleeve.

19. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in an upward direction, means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction, nuid operated means for impelling said iirst-mentioned anchoring means into engagement'with said casing, separate uuid operated means for impelling said second-mentioned anchoring means into engagement with said casing, and means for conducting uid under pressure simultaneously to said respective fluid-operated means to produce their actuation.

20. An apparatus of the character described including a tubular well packer body, means for anchoring said body to a well casing against movement in an upward direction, means for anchoring said body to said casing against movement in a downward direction, fluid operated means for impelling said nrst-mentioned anchoring means into engagement with said casing, separate iiuid operated means for impelling said second-mentioned anchoring means into engagement with said casing, a tubular member within said body having means for conducting fluid from the interior of said member to said respective fluid operated means. and means movable within said tubular member for controlling, the passage of iiuid through said conducting means;

21. An apparatus of the character described including a tubular well packer body, means for anchoring said body to a well casing, fluid operated means for lmpelling said anchoring means into engagement with said casing, a tubular member within said body having ported means for conducting fluid from the interior of said member to said fluid operated means, and valve means within said member normally closing said ported means and adapted for slidable movement therewithin to open said ported means.

22. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer, a member within said packer formingv the lower end of a runningin string by which said packer is movable through a well casing, means for coupling said member to said packer, means within said member for retion, said last-mentioned means being movable by the pressure of fluid within said member to a position permitting inward movement of said coupling means to effect release of said member from said well packer.

23. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer having a tubular body, a tubular member within said body forming part of a tubular string by which said packer is movable through a well casing, coupling means, a sleeve within said member for holding said coupling means in an outer position to couple said member to said tubular body, and means enabling said sleeve to be shifted by fluid under pressure within said member to a position permitting said coupling means to move inwardly and uncouple said member from said body.

24. An apparatus of the character described including a Well packer having a body, a member within said body forming part of a run-in string by which said packer is movable through a well bore, coupling means, means within said member for holding said coupling means in position to couple said member and body together, and means enabling said holding means to Ibe shifted fluid under pressure within said member to allow said coupling means to occupy a position uncoupling said member and body.

25. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer having a body, a inember within said body forming part of a run-in string by which said packer is movable through a well bore, coupling means carried by said member, means within said member for holding said coupling means in an outer position to couple said member to said body, said holding means having a recessed portion, and means for shifting said holding means within said member to position its recessed portion adjacent said coupling means and permit withdrawal of the latter inwardly from said body.

26. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer having a tubular body, a tubular member within said body forming part of a tubular string by which said packer is movable through a well bore, coupling means carried by said member. a sleeve within said member for y holding said coupling means in an outer position uld pressure to be built up in said tubular member to shift said sleeve and position its recessed portion adjacent said coupling means, permitting withdrawal ofthe latter inwardly from the body. 27. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer having a tubular body, a tubular member within said body forming part of a tubular string by which said packer is movable through a well bore, latches pivotally carried by said member and receivable within a groove in said body, a sleeve within said member for holding said latches in said groove to couple said member to said body, said sleeve having a portion of reduced diameter, and means for closing the passage'through said sleeve tov enable uid under pressure to be Ibuilt up within said tubular string and shift said sleeve downwardly to position its reduced diameter portion opposite said ylatches, permitting their inward withdrawal from said body groove.

28. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a wellv casing, normally retracted means carried by said body,fluid operated means for impelling said normally retracted means into engagement with said casing, a member within said body forming part of a run-in string by which said body is movable through said casing, releasable means for coupling said member to said body, and means within said memberl for controlling the passage of fluid to said iiuid operated means and release of said releasable means to allow uncoupling of said member and body from each other.

29. An apparatus of the character described including a body adapted to be lowered in a well casing, normally ,retracted slips carried by said body. fluid operated means for impelling said slips into engagement with said casing, a tubular member within said body forming part of a tubular string by which said body is movable through said casing, releasable means for coupling said member to said body, means having ports therein for conducting uid from the interior of said tubular member to said fluid operated means,

if, said ported means holding said releasable means in coupling position, and means within said ported means normally closing its ports, but adapted for sliding movement therewithin to open said ports and move said ported means within said tubular member to a position allowing release of said releasable means and uncoupling of said member and body from each other.

30. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer body, a tubular member within said body forming part of a tubular string by. which said body is movable through a well casing, normally retracted slips carriedby said body, iiuid operated means for impelling said slips into engagement with said casing, releasable means for coupling said member to said body, a sleeve having ports within said member, said sleeve holding' said releasable means in coupling position, a valve within said sleeve normally closing said ports to prevent passage of fluid to said uid operated means, and means cooperable with said valve to open said ports and shift said sleeve in said member to a position allowing release of said releasable means and uncoupling of said member and body from each other.

31. In combination, a liner, a liner hanger for selectively positioning and suspending said liner in a well pipe, and having a passage therethrough, a setting tool having means detachy ably engageable with said hanger and extending into the passage thereof, said tool also having a uld channel therein and means for closing of! the space between the same and the hanger when engaged therein, and awash pipe depending within the liner from said tool..

32. In combination, a liner hanger for selected, retrievable setting in a well pipe, having a lengthwise passage, a liner suspended from said hanger, a setting tool engageable with, and disengageable from, said hanger for setting the latter and having a hollow body telescoping within the passage of the hanger when engaged therewith and closing the same, and a wash pipe carried by said tool body in communication with the hollow body thereof and depending, in said engaged position of the tool, within the liner substantially below the lower end of the hanger.

33. A well packer having external means for engagement with a well pipe in which the packer is to be set, iluid pressure actuated means for moving said external means into engagement with said well pipe, a setting tool Within said packer having conducting means to feed iiuid under pressure to and actuate said fluid pressure actuated means, and iiuid pressure controlled valve means in said setting tool initially maintaining said conducting means closed to ow of iluid to said fluid pressure actuated means to prevent movement of said external means into engagement with said pipe prior to the time when it is desired to set said packer in said pipe, said valve means being operable when desired.

,34. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer body, means for anchoring said body to a well casing, fluid operated means for impelling said anchoring means into engagement with said casing, a tubular-member within said body having ported means for conducting iluid from the interior of said member.

to said iluidoperated means, and valve means for closing said ported means prior to engagement of said anchoring means with said casing.

35. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer body, means for anchoring said body to a well casing, fluid operated means for impelling said anchoring means into engagement with said casing, a setting tool detachably connected with said body and having a tubular member within said body provided with v a port for conducting uid from the interior of said setting tool to said uid operated means, a sleeve valve normally closing said port, and means ffor closing the bore of said sleeve valve to enable its hydraulic shifting to a position in which said port is open.

36. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer body, slips for anchoring said body to a well casing, uid operated means for shifting said slips into engagement with said casing, a tubular setting tool member within said body having a port for establishing communication between the interior of said member and said fluid operated means, a. sleeve valve within said member for closing said port, and means movable downwardly in said member to close the bore through said sleeve valve and enable its hydraulic shifting to port opening position.

37. An apparatus of the character described including a well packer body, retracted means carried by said body, iiuid operated means for impelling said retracted means into engagement with a well casing, a tubular member within said Vbody having ported means for conducting fluid from the interior of said member to said iiuid operated means, valve means having a bore adapted to be positioned Within said member to allow iluid passage through said ported means, and means for closing the bore of said valve means to enable iiuid pressure to be built up in said tubular member to actuate said fluid operated means and to shift said valve means Within said tubular member to a position allowing passage of fluid through said member after closing of said bore.

CLARENCE E. BURT.

THEODORE SU'I'IER. THOMAS M. RAGAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/122, 166/143, 166/208, 166/125, 166/191, 166/194
International ClassificationE21B33/13, E21B43/10, E21B43/02, E21B33/14
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/14, E21B43/10
European ClassificationE21B43/10, E21B33/14