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Publication numberUS2316724 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1943
Filing dateMar 9, 1942
Priority dateMar 9, 1942
Publication numberUS 2316724 A, US 2316724A, US-A-2316724, US2316724 A, US2316724A
InventorsPierce Sperry
Original AssigneePierce Sperry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Outlet connector with strainer for tanks
US 2316724 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 13, 1943. P. SPERRY OUTLET CONNECTOR WITH STHAINER FOR TANKS Fil ed March 9, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 .IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII oilltlil'llillillllll April 13, 1943. P. SPERRY v 2,316,724

OUTLET CONNECTOR WITH STRAINER FOR TANKS Filed March 9, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 fa /a9 J 3/7" Patented Apr. 13, 1943 OUTLET CONNECTOR. WITH STRAINER FOR TANKS Pierce Sperry, Middlefield, Ohio Application March 9, 1942, Serial No. 433,862 4 Claims. (01. 285-138) This invention relates to tank connectors, and is a continuation in part of my co-pending application, Serial No. 412,043 filed September 23, 1941.

It will be appreciated that such tanks are usually associated or connected with apparatus in which the liquid in the tanks is used. Further,

' it will be appreciated that often such tanks are used apart from the apparatus and are supported independently or by means not always in accurate alignment with the associated apparatus.

The comparative recent development in ceramics in which the physical properties of vitreous enamel have been vastly improved has provided tanks of light steel covered with vitreous enamel which has largely replaced tanks of copper, zinc and cast iron of higher costs and lower utility. Such tanks have invaded the plumbing field and have been utilized for such plumbing fixtures as bathtubs, sinks and lavatories. These tanks of light steel covered with thin coatings of vitreous enamel have one serious weakness-that is, their liability to chip when subjected to sharp bending stresses and shocks. This Weakness frequently is encountered as a result of the outlet piping connections which, as aforesaid, are not always mounted in accurate relationship with the associated apparatus. The condition is further aggravated by the fact that tanks of light steel when coated with vitreous enamel often are warped or distorted as a result of the necessary high enamelling heat.

To combat the conditions as above outlined, designers and engineers have developed connector structures wherein the connections are made on a tapered wall outlet opening in the tank. The connector contacts have been usually made by soft lead washers associated with zinc die castings. This connection provides considerable structural adaptability and fit in the joint between the comparatively fragile vitreous tank and the connections. However, even with all this ingenuous high cost construction, expensive failures have occurred, that is, the enamel in the tank is cracked at the joint and rust and failure ensue. The present invention utilizes a strainer member in connection with the connector and utilizes the strainer as a lock means, as will later be explained.

The present defense armament program has limited the use of certain strategic materials and among these, zinc is most critical. This has had the effect of seriously handicapping many nondefense industries whose products involve the use of such materials.

It is the principal object of this invention to provide non-ferrous connector means with ,a strainer for light vitreous enamel tanks or the like, said connector and strainer providing greater adaptability to non-uniform conditions, and less liable to damage the tank from dangerous stresses imposed by the connector.

Other objects and benefits will be disclosed in the following descriptions and drawings, show- 7 ing my novel connector with strainer, adapted to a conventional washing machine tub as illustrative of my invention.

Fig. 1 is a broken cross sectional elevational view of a corner of a washing machine tub, showing a drain opening, with my novel rubber connector and strainer installed therein;

Fig. 2' is a broken cross sectional elevational view of another connector with strainer, as will later be explained;

- Fig. 3 is a similar broken cross sectional elevational view of another form of connectorwith strainer;

Fig. 4 is a broken cross sectional elevational view of still another form of connector with strainer; and

Fig.5 is a broken cross sectional elevational View of a connector with strainer attached by screwing the parts together as will later be explained.

Now referring to the drawings, and at the outset, to Fig. 1, I designate a conventional form of washing machine tub by the numeral II]. This tub is normally about 23 inches in diameter and 50 inches high. The drain openings are usually about six inches inward from the wall of the tub as is well shown in Fig. 1. The common practice is to provide drain openings in the bottom of the tub with a conical wall opening I 3. In this conical opening, I insert my rubber connector consisting of an upper section 14 and a lower section l5 with a recess therebetween to accommodate conical walls l3 of the drain opening. In the lower flange I! of the connector, I provide a recess to accommodate a metal lock ring I6 to firmly attach the connector to a drain tube of any desired form A. Near the inner end of the upper section I4 I provide a recess IS in which I insert a perforated drain disc l8. This disc mayoriginally be in convex form and expanded into fiatwise condition as shown to provide means to lock the flanges of the connector in sealing contact. It will be appreciated that ahnost any form of drain may be inserted in the opening and such a drain device would have the effect of expanding the upper section M of the connector and to hold it in the desired sealing engagement.

Now referring to Fig. 2, the parts l0, l3, l4, l5, l6 and I! are exactly the same as those described in Fig. 1. However, in Fig. 2, I have provided a plug type strainer 20, having a circumferential bead 2| (this bead may be in the form of a screw thread) which expands the upper section 14 of the connector to hold it in sealing engagement with the flange opening.

Now referring to Fig. 3, I show a connector 22 having an expansible bead 22A adapted to grip the drain wall 13 between this expansible bead 22A and a tapered flange section 22B. This connection is effected by an inner perforate circular lock member 24 and an upper flanged strainer member 23 drawn together by a cap screw 25 as shown. By this structure, it will be appreciated that the connector 22 is firmly gripped in sealing engagement with the flange opening l3.

Now referring to Fig. 4, I show another form of rubber connector 26 having a shoulder flange 26A and a tapered flange 26B which are held together by a heavy rubber lock ring 21 with the flange 2613 being expanded outwardly in sealing engagement by a disc strainer member 23 in.- serted in an inner recess 23. This strainer member may originally be in convex form as shown in dotted outline and then forced into concave sealing position as shown.

Now referring to Fig. 5, I show a flanged rubber connector member 30 being held in the flanged opening 13 by screwing a strainer member 33 having threads 33A into a female threaded member 3iv having mating threads 3|A. By screwing these members 3| and 33 together, the rubber connector 30 will be tightly gripped between the tapered walls of the drain opening [3 by the members 3! and 33. A gasket 32 is inserted between the flange of the member 3| and the outer wall of the drain opening l3.

It will be appreciated by the foregoing that many forms of drains may be adapted to hold a rubber connector in sealing engagement with the drain openings of tanks. However, I do not wish to be limited to any specific structure except as such limitations are imposed by the following claims.

I now claim as new:

1. In a connector attachment for tank outlets, a soft flexible tubular member adapted to abut the tank outlet flange, a strainer member adapted to cover the tank outlet, and to co-act with the tubular member to lock the tubular member in sealing attachment to the outlet flange.

2. In a connector attachment for tank outlets, a soft flexible tubular member adapted to be inserted in the tank outlet in abutting engagement with the tank outlet flange, a strainer member adapted to engage the top of the tubular member and cover the outlet opening therein, and to co-act with the tubular member to lock the tubular member in sealing attachment to the outlet flange.

3. In a connector for attachment with the outlets of tanks, a soft flexible tubular member adapted to be inserted within the outlet, flange means on the tubular member adapted to be engaged in gripping sealed contact with the tank outlet, an inner recess in the flange means, and a strainer member adapted to be inserted within the inner recess and to lock the flange in sealing attachment with the tank outlet.

4. In a connector attachment for tank outlets, a soft flexible tubular member adapted to be inserted in the tank outlet in abutting engagement with the outlet flange, a strainer member adapted to engage the top of the tubular member and cover the outlet opening therein, and ring means encircling the tubular member below the tank outlet adapted to urge the strainer member into engagement with the tubular member and to seal the tank outlet.

PIERCE SPERRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3680153 *Dec 11, 1969Aug 1, 1972American Standard IncDrain for plumbing fixtures
US4170047 *Jun 30, 1978Oct 9, 1979Corsette Douglas FrankVaned anti-vortex pool drain cover
US4850617 *Dec 15, 1987Jul 25, 1989Moberly Dan LeroySelf sealing connector
US4984309 *May 19, 1989Jan 15, 1991Lowry Robert DConveying water
US7854450 *Sep 24, 2004Dec 21, 2010Brother Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaTube fixing structure and fixing member used therefor
US7988203Sep 5, 2007Aug 2, 2011Sewer Tap Inc.Minimal penetration lateral pipe connection assembly
US8137036Dec 11, 2008Mar 20, 2012Sewer Tap Inc.Coring tool alignment system
US8196968 *Jun 7, 2007Jun 12, 2012Sewer Tap Inc.Lateral pipe connection assembly
US8770897Nov 4, 2009Jul 8, 2014Advanced Drainage Systems, Inc.Coring tool alignment assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/288, 285/202, 285/242
International ClassificationD06F39/10, D06F39/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F39/10
European ClassificationD06F39/10