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Publication numberUS2316983 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1943
Filing dateMay 17, 1940
Priority dateMay 17, 1940
Publication numberUS 2316983 A, US 2316983A, US-A-2316983, US2316983 A, US2316983A
InventorsWilliam Wulf
Original AssigneeWilliam Wulf
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment construction
US 2316983 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. WULF GARMENT CONSTRUCTION April 20, 1943.

Filed May 17, 1940 VENTOR NEY Patented Apr. 20, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GARMENT CONSTRUCTION William Wulf, New York, N. Y.

Application May 17, 1940, Serial N 0. 335,664

1 Claim.

This invention relates to a garment construction and more particularly to a removable innerlining construction for overcoats or the like.

An object of this invention is to provide a novel iridescent lining construction for the removable inner lining which does not show any stitching at the seams.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel means for attaching the sleeves of the innerlining to the outer garment with which it is to be used whereby the sleeves will not pull from their position in the garment when it is removed by the wearer.

Materials used in making this innerlining consists of a woolen innerlining that reaches almost to the bottom of the coat and an iridescent lining which reaches about four or five inches below the armhole of the woolen innerlining and all the way down to the bottom of the woolen sleeve innerlining. The seam edges of the woolen innerlining at thesides are piped with regular piping material.

All the seams of the woolen innerlining are sewed together including the sewing in of the sleeves. All the seams of the iridescent lining are sewed together inside out, including the sewing in the sleeves. The iridescent lining is then sewed. across the back of the woolen innerlining as far down as it reaches. The iridescent sleeve lining is then pulled through the woolen sleeve lining so that the wrong side of the woolen lining is faced with the wrong side of the iridescent lining.

The seams of the iridescent lining are tacked to the seams of the woolen lining at the armhole and at the sleeve seams. The bottom of the sleeve of the woolen lining is piped and the iridescent lining at this point is turned in and stitched through the woolen lining. The bottom of the body lining is then piped. The Zipper is then sewed to the raw edge of the innerlining in the usual way.

The difference in construction of this innerlining over the innerlining constructions heretofore used is that the iridescent lining and the wool lining parts of the old construction are first sewn together and then all seams are sewn as one. This leaves a raw edge on the iridescent linin and on the woolen lining at the armhole which must be piped or bound. Applicant's method of making his lining eliminates the necessity of binding or piping the armholes.

Further objects and advantages of this in- Vention will become apparent as the description thereof proceeds, reference being had to the accompanying drawing wherein:

Figure 1 shows an elevation of the innerlining of this invention with the iridescent lining turned inside out and attached at its bottom edge to the wool innerlining illustrating a step in the assembly of the two;

Fig. 2 is similar to Figure 1 showing an advanced step in the assembly;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view showing the end of one of the sleeves of the innerlining; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional view showing the sleeve of the innerlining inside the sleeve of the coat with which it is to be used.

The innerlining H) is constructed of any suitable material such as wool or the like, and is all sewed together, including the sleeves H, with the seams on the wrong side of the material. The iridescent lining I2 is also sewed together, including its sleeves l3 on the wrong side. Figure 1 clearly shows the stitching Id at the armholes of the innerlining and the stitching l5 which joins the sleeves to the body of the iridescent lining.

The assembled iridescent lining is then stitched on the wrong side at its bottom to the innerlining as shown by stitching l 6.

The iridescent lining is then turned up and its sleeves l3 telescoped into sleeves ll of the innerlining to the assembled position as shown on Fig. 2. The iridescent lining is tacked at the seams at the top and bottom of the armholes to the innerlining as indicated by numeral I1.

It will now be seen that the exposed rough edges of the innerlining and of the iridescent lining are completely hidden from view.

The ends of the sleeves of the iridescent lining are stitched to the innerlining as shown at I 8 (Fig. 3) and a binding [9 is stitched over the end of the sleeve of the innerlining.

The Zipper 20 which functions to attach the finished innerlining to the coat is stitched doubly by the stitchings 2| and 22 to the innerlining and iridescent lining. These stitchings 2| and 2?. between the linings and the Zipper function to complete the assembly of the innerlining and iridescent lining.

When the innerlining is joined to the coat by the Zipper and its sleeves are within the sleeves of the coat, a means is provided by this invention to keep the telescoped sleeves firmly in position when the wearer removes the coat. This means comprises in the example shown snap buttons 23. One element of the snap buttons is attached to the outside of the bottom edge of the sleeve of the innerlining and the other element is attached in a complementary position to the inside of the sleeve 24 of the coat. When these snap buttons are snapped together, the sleeves of the innerlining and the coat are firmly held together and will not separate when the wearer removes the coat. Upon separation of these snap buttons the innerlining can be readily removed from the coat in the usual manner.

Having thus described my invention as illustrated on the drawings by way of example only I do not wish to be limited to the exact details of criistruction and arrangement of parts as showlrl bu, all equivalents as may fall within the I scope of the appended claim are meant to be included.

I claim:

A method of forming a detachable innerlining for a coat or the like, comprising the steps of stitching the parts of the innerlining together on the wrong side, stitching the parts of a lining for the innerlining on the wrong side, stitching the bottom edge of the lining to the innerlining below the armholes, turning the lining upwards and telescoping the sleeves thereof into the sleeves of the innerlining, tacking the two linings together at the seams near the arm pits and sewing the two linings together.

WILLIAM WULF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2462165 *Dec 28, 1945Feb 22, 1949Condon Naomi VGarment for infants
US2507322 *Nov 7, 1947May 9, 1950Smith Betty AOuter garment
US4217663 *Jun 18, 1979Aug 19, 1980Baker J WVest
US4470155 *Jan 20, 1982Sep 11, 1984Descente Ltd.Jumper
US8225422 *Oct 17, 2008Jul 24, 2012Mcsparron Erin JCar seat coat
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/97
International ClassificationA41D27/04, A41D27/02
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/04
European ClassificationA41D27/04