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Publication numberUS2317005 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1943
Filing dateApr 14, 1941
Priority dateApr 14, 1941
Publication numberUS 2317005 A, US 2317005A, US-A-2317005, US2317005 A, US2317005A
InventorsWasserman Nathan
Original AssigneeWasserman Nathan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping carton
US 2317005 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 20, 1943. WASSERMAN 2,317,005

SHIPPING CARTON Filed April 14, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 /0 20 INVENTOR N.WASSEF\MAN TT RNEYS Patented Apr. 20, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHIPPING CARTON Nathan Wasserman, South Milwaukee, Wis. Application April 14, 1941, Serial No. 388,476

6 Claims.

This invention appertains to shipping cartons, and more particularly to a novel container for preserving perishable foodstuffs during transit.

One of the primary objects of my invention is to provide a shipping carton having a main compartment for the foodstuffs, and an auxiliary compartment for a preferred refrigerant, with the compartments so arranged as to insure a desired circulation of air through the compartments to bring about the proper cooling of articles in the main compartment.

Another salient object of my invention is to provide an insert for shipping cartons of the type now commonly used in the trade, for forming the main and auxiliary compartments in said carton in th desired relation.

A further object of my invention is to provide an insert for shipping cartons embodying transverse partitions for forming a main food compartment and end compartments for a refrigerant, and a false bottom for the main and auxiliary compartments, whereby to hold the foodstuffs and refrigerant above the bottom of the carton, so as to bring about the desired circulation of air through the main compartment.

A further important object of my invention is to provide divider strips carried by the top of the carton for engaging the foodstuffs to insure the spacing of the top of the carton from the foodstuffs and thereby provide a top air circulating space, the strips also functioning to direct the air from the auxiliary compartments down through the main compartment.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a refrigerator carton of the above character, which will b durable and efficient in use, one that will be simple and easy to manufacture, and one which can be placed upon the market at a reasonable cost. V

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement, and formation of parts, as will be hereinafter more specifically described, claimed, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspectiv view of a shipping carton with my attachment incorporated therewith. I

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1, but showing the cover and end flaps of the carton in their open position,

Figure 3 is a top plan view of a shipping carton with my novel attachment incorporated therewith, parts of th figure being shown broken away and in section.

Figure 4 is a. longitudinal sectional view through the shipping carton, taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 3, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 5 is a transverse sectional view through th carton, taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 4, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 5, buttaken on the line 6--6 of Figure 4, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawings in detail, wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts through the several views, the letter C generally indicates a shipping carton, and A my novel attachment or insert therefor.

The carton C can b of any preferred character and constructed from any desired materials, and can be considered of the type now commonly used in the trade for shipping foodstuffs and other merchandise. The carton can be made from heavy cardboard or corrugated board, or wood, or combinations of these materials, and the carton can be waterproofed, if so desired.

As illustrated, the carton includes a bottom wall Ill, side walls II and I2, and end walls l3 and M. The end walls I3 and I4 carry end flaps l5, and the side walls II and I2 carry closure My appliance or insert A includes a false bottom plate 20, and this false bottom plate 20 can be held in spaced relation to the bottom wall Ill by means of suitable supports 2 I. It is preferred to have these supports of a tubular form to allow th circulation of air therethrough, for a purpose which will be later set forth.

As is clearly shown in Figure 4 of the drawings, the false bottom plate 20 extends from one end of the carton to the other. The insert or attachment A also includes transverse partitions 22 and 23 arranged in spaced parallel relation to the end walls l3 and l4 to form a main central compartment 24 and end auxiliary compartments 25 and 26. The partitions extend entirely across the carton from one side wall to the other, and the side edges of the partitions have formed thereon bent-back attaching flanges 21, which engage the sides of the carton. These flanges 21 can be secured to the side walls of the carton in any preferred manner, such as by the use of pronged paper fasteners or the like 28. The partitions rest upon the upper face of the false bottom plate 20 and terminate short of the upper end of the carton, for a purpose which will-also be hereinafter set forth.

Longitudinally extending slots 29 are formed in the false bottom between the partitions 22 and 23, and transversely extending slots 30 are formed in the false bottom plate 20 between the partitions 22 and 23 and the adjacent end walls I 3 and H,

The auxiliary compartments 25 and 26 are adapted to receive a suitable refrigerant, while the main compartment 24 is adapted to receive the perishable foodstuifs. Where dry ice is used as the refrigerant, the same can be packed in containers 3|, which can be placed on the false bottom plate 20. The containers II are of less width than the width of the auxiliary compartments, and in order to hold the containers from contact with the transverse partitions 22 and 23, and the end walls I3 and i|,'the ends of the containers Ii can carry spacing strips 22, which strips project beyond the sides of the containers for engaging the transverse partitions and the end walls of the carton.

By this arrangement, air circulating spaces around the dry ice containers ii are formed, and the walls of the containers are held out of direct contact with the transverse partitions and the end walls, so as to prevent frosting of the partitions and the end walls. The ,strips 32 also act as spacers for holding the ends of the containers 3| away from thesides of the carton.

By referring to Figures 3 and 4, it will be noted that the transverse slots 30 in the false bottom plate 20 are arranged on opposite sides of the containers, whereby to permit the free flow of air from between the false bottom plate and the bottom wall of the carton into the spaces between the containers ill and the transverse partitions and end walls of the carton.

In use of the carton, the foodstuffs, such as meats and the like, are packed in the main compartment 24 on the false bottom 20, and the containers for the dry ice are placed in the auxiliary compartments. The carton is sealed in the ordinary way, and the same is ready for shipping.

By providing the false bottom, a space is left under the main compartment and the auxiliary compartments 26, and by ending the transverse partitions 22 and 23 short of the upper end of the compartments, an air space above the compartments is also provided. This allows the free circulation of air through the food compartment 24 and the refrigerating auxiliary compartments 25 and 26. Hence, the goods being shipped will be maintained in a cool condition.

I lay great stress on the fact that the air is allowed to freely circulate through the compartments,-and owing to my arrangement of parts, a natural circulation of air takes place, as the warm air will tend to rise in the carton, and cool air will tend to flow to the bottom of the carton. I also prefer to provide the cover flaps It with depending divider strips 33 on their inner faces,

and these strips can be secured to the cover flaps It in any preferred manner, such as by the use of pronged fastening elements 34. These divider strips 33 are arranged at the central part of the carton and extend transversely across the carton when the cover flaps iii are in their closed position, as shown in Figures 4'and 5. These divider strips tend to hold the cover flaps in their proper position above the foodstuffs being shipped, so as to insure the forming of the top air circulating space. Also, these divider strips act as a guard or bafile for directing the air flowing through the refrigerating auxiliary compartments 25 and 20 down through'the foodstuffs.

Where vegetables are being shipped in a carton, such as lettuce, it might be preferred to use cracked ice in the auxiliary compartments 2! and 26 in lieu of'dry ice, as the dry ice may have a detrimental effect on the tender leaves of the lettuce. Where cracked ice is used, any suit able means can be provided for taking care of the water from the melting ice, and, if desired, drain asmoos openings can be formed in the bottom of the carton under the end compartments 2| and 20.

By having the supports 2 of a tubular construc- From the foregoing description it can be seen that I have provided a novel appliance for association with shipping cartons for eflectively preserving foodstuifs while the carton is in transit or storage. 1

Changes in details may be-made, providing the same do not depart from the spirit or scope of the claims, but what I claim as new is:

1. A shipping carton comprising, a bottom wall, end and side walls, and cover flaps, a false bottom plate in said carton held in spaced relation to the bottom wall and having openings therein for the circulation of air therethrough, and transverse partitions extending from one side wall to the other in spaced relation to the' end walls forming a main food compartment and end auxiliary refrigerant receiving compartments, said partitions terminating short of the upper end of the carton and resting upon said false bottom.

2. In a shipping carton including a bottom wall, end and side walls, and closure flaps, an insert attachment for the carton including a false bottom plate extending from one end of the carton to the other having openings therein for the flow of air therethrough, supports for spacing the false bottom plate from the bottom wall of the carton, transverse partitions extending across the carton from one side wall to the other disposed upon the upper face of the false bottom plate to form in the carton a main foodreceiving compartment and end refrigerant receiving compartments, and removable dry icereceiving containers disposed in the auxiliary compartments.

3. In a shipping carton including a bottom wall, end and side walls, and closure flaps, an in sert attachment for the carton including a false bottom plate extending from one end of the cartonto the other having openings therein for the flow of air therethrough, supports for spacing the false bottom plate from the bottom wall of the-carton, transverse partitions extending across the carton from one side wall to the other disposed uponthe upper face of the false bottom 'plate to form in the carton a main food-receiving compartment and end refrigerant receiving compartments, removable dry ice-receiving containers disposed in the auxiliary compartments, and means for spacing the walls of the containers from the end walls of the carton and the ment for the carton including a false bottom plate extending from'one end of the carton to the other having openings therein for the circulation of air therethrough, transverse part1 tions fitted upon the false bottom plate and connected with the side walls of the carton, said partitions terminating short of the upper end of the carton, means for holding the false bottom plate in spaced relation to the bottom wall of" the compartment, and depending divider strips carried by the inner faces'of the closure flaps-of the carton.

'5. In a shipping carton having a bottom wan,

end and side walls, and closure flaps, an attachment for. the carton including a false bottom...-

plate extending from one end of 'the carton to the other, means for supporting the false bottom plate in spaced relation to the bottom wall of the carton, transverse partitions resting upon the bottom wall and connecting with the side walls of the carton in spaced relation to the end walls to form a main compartment and auxiliary end compartments, said partitions terminating short of the upper end of the carton, and dry ice-receivingcontainers removably fitted in the auxiliary end compartments in spaced relation to the end walls of the carton and the transverse partitions, said false b ttom plate having openings therein for establishing communication with the main compartment and the space below the false bottom, and additional openings therein located between the side walls of the dry ice containers and the end walls of the carton and the transverse partitions.

6. In a shipping carton having a bottom wall, end and side walls, and closure flaps, an attachment for the carton including a false bottom plate extending from one end of the carton to the other, means for supporting the false bottom plate in spaced ielation to the bottom wall of the carton, transverse partitions resting upon the bottom wall and connecting, with the side walls of the carton in spaced relation to the end walls to form a main compartment and auxiliary end compartments, said partitions terminating short of the upper end of the carton, and dry ice-receiving containers removably fitted in the auxiliary end compartments in spaced relation to the end walls of the carton and the transverse partltions, said false bottom plate having openings therein'for establishing communication with the main compartment and the space below the false bottom, and additional openings therein located between the side walls of the dry ice containers and the end walls of the carton and the transverse partitions, said supports for the false bottom plate being of a tubular construction to permit the flow of air therethrough.

' NATHAN WASSERMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2734349 *Apr 21, 1952Feb 14, 1956 Refrigerated container
US4498312 *Nov 23, 1983Feb 12, 1985Schlosser Edward PMethod and apparatus for maintaining products at selected temperatures
US6370885Apr 29, 1999Apr 16, 2002Decision Point Marketing, Inc.Point-of-sale chilled product housing
US6415623Jan 5, 2001Jul 9, 2002Cold Sell Systems, LlcPoint of sale product chiller
US6453682Nov 29, 2001Sep 24, 2002Cold-Sell Systems, L.L.C.Point-of-sale chilled product housing
US9180998Sep 11, 2008Nov 10, 2015Cold Chain Technologies, Inc.Insulated pallet shipper and methods of making and using the same
US20110049164 *Sep 11, 2008Mar 3, 2011Mark BanksInsulated pallet shipper and methods of making and using the same
EP2200904A1 *Sep 11, 2008Jun 30, 2010Cold Chain Technologies, Inc.Insulated pallet shipper and methods of making and using the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/371, 217/42, 229/941, 229/120, 62/415, 217/130
International ClassificationB65D81/38
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/941, B65D81/3853
European ClassificationB65D81/38G2