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Publication numberUS2317632 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1943
Filing dateJul 20, 1939
Priority dateJul 20, 1939
Publication numberUS 2317632 A, US 2317632A, US-A-2317632, US2317632 A, US2317632A
InventorsMiller Leonidas C
Original AssigneeEastman Oil Well Survey Co, Eastman Oil Well Survey Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for surveying well bores
US 2317632 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SAD-M70912 IVU a April 27, 1943. L. CQMILLER I SUBSTI FOR "1 mums FOR suavmrms WELL scans 9 Sheets-Sheet 1 3 Mm Leonidas C. Miller I l /50A Filed July 20. 1939 m h a: 5 v by f, I 2 MM W Y l w MC J U l A r V r V T 27, 1943. L a MILLER 2,317,632

EEANS FOR SURVEYING WELL BORBS Filed July 20, 1939 S She ets-Sheet 2 Zeom'aas C. 14/7/61 April 27, 1943. 1.. c. MILLER MEANS FOR SURVEYING WELL BORES Filed July 20, 1939 9 Sheets-Shut 3 Leonidas C. Mil/ ei April 27, 1943. L. c. MILLER V MEANS FOR SURVEYING WELL BORBS Filed July 20. 19:9 9 sheets-shes; 4

Zlvwemtob Leon/Has C. MIY/er' 1943- k c. MILLER w 2,317,632

V MEANS FOR SURVEYING WELL BORES Filed July go, 1939 v 9 Sheets-Sheet s Leom'oas C. Miller .Ap' 27,1943. L c. mum

V MEANS FOR SURVEYING BORES 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed July 20, 1939 3 W1) 24m Leonidas C. Mil/er {2 lli April 27, 1943. I L. c. MRLLER MEANS FOR SURVEYING WELL BORES Filed July 20; 1939 9 Sheets-Sheet v April 27, 1943; Y L. c. MiLLE 2,317,532

' MEANS FOR SURVEYING WELL BORES Filed July 20, 1939 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 April 27, 1943; Y L. c. MILLER MEANS FOR sunvsnue WELL BORES I Filed July 20, 1939 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 uunrnunnnunnnuu an qonn n l Zeom'aas C. Mf/ler mats Apr. 27, 1943 umrso s'ra'rss PATENT orrlcs 2,317,832 I v p MEANS FOR SUBVEYDIG WELL BOBES This invention relates to new and useful improvements in methods of and means ior surveyins well bores.

In the drilling of wells, and particularly in drilling to greater depths, it is not only desirable and advantageous, but substantially essential that the drilling operator be advised of the direction and inclination from the vertical oi the bore hole, as the drilling proceeds. Such information makes it possible to accurately drill the hole in the desired manner, that is, in the proper direction and at the proper angle or inclination. Particularly in angular drilling, which has come into more extensive use, is such information regarding the trend of the bore hole especially valuable for, without it,. accurate angular drilling cannot be accomplished.

It is one object of the invention to provide an improved method of surveying a bore hole wherein electrical impulses are transmitted to the surface, such impulse being in accordance with the Application July 20, 1939, Serial No. 285,597

22 Claims. '(Cl. 33 2055) orienting and transmitting unit which is arranged to be lowered into the well bore on a flexible line and which has means for transmitting electrical impulses, representative of the direction and degree of inclination of the bore, to the surface, such impulses actuating an indicating unit at the surface to transpose said impulses into visible indications to visibly record the direction and deviation of the bore.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved apparatus, of the character described, wherein a compass is associated with a light responsive cell, the latter controlling the position of a directional indicating mechanism, whereby the mechanism is maintained in a fixed position or direction, so that a. basis is establlshecl from which readings, as to direction and angle or deviation from the vertical of the bore,

direction and inclination of the bore hole, whereby said impulses are indicative of the trend of said hole.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved well surveying method by which electrical impulses of varying frequencies are generated and transmitted to the surface in accordance with the direction and deviation 0! the well bore, said impulses being received at the surface and transposed into visible indications to indicate the trend oi the bore: the method involving a minimum lengthoi time, whereby surveying of the bore is facilitated.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved electrical well survey apparatus for surveying a bore hole, whereby both the direction of inclination and the degree or angle oi inclination from the vertical may be readily determined at various or successive points in the bore hole to indicate the trend oi said bore: the apparatus being unaffected by voltage fluctuation and temperature changes and the measurements or readings being taken being based solely on time, whereby accuracy of the measurements is assured.

An important object oi the invention is to provide an improved apparatus for surveying a well bore which is constructed so that the direction and degree of inclination of the bore will be indicated and recorded at the surface of said bore, whereby a permanent record of the trend may be taken.

A particular object of the invention is to pro vide an improved well survey apparatus having an electrical contact, the position or which is controlled by a compass so as to maintain said contact in a fixed position, the apparatus also including a pair o movable electrical contacts which are controlled by weight elements and which indicate the direction and angle of inollnation oi the well bore, respectively, together with a master rotatable contact disk arranged to engage the trio of contacts to close electrical circuits to an indicating mechanism located at a point remote from said contacts, whereby the direction and angle of inclination oi the bore may be accurately indicated at the surface.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved compass unit which will accurately maintain a fixed point in a predetermined direction, whereby such point provides a basis from which indications and readings may be obtained.

A still further object of the invention is to i provide an electrically operated survey apparatus which is arranged so that the electrical power for operating the apparatus, as well as the generated indicating impulses, may be.

transmitted over the same conductor, whereby lowering of the device through the well bore is facilitated.

Another important-object of the invention is to provide an improved indicating and recording unit wherein the indications are recorded on a tape, or other element, which permits a. continuous, as well as a permanent, record to be made. A construction designed carry out-the in.-

vention will be hereinafter described, tosether c! the outer housing and illustrating the unit mounted within said housing, I

Figure 3 is an enlarged transverse, vertical,

sectional view of the upper portion oithe trans- 'mitting unit.

Figure 4 is a similar view of the intermediate portion said unit,

Figure 5 is a similar view of the lower portion of said unit,

Figure 6 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line6-8 of Figure 4,

Figure I is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line of Figure 4,

Figure 8 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Figure 4,

Figure 9 is an enlarged transverse. vertical, sectional view of the contact assembhr and also or the weight assembly, the same being illustrated in an inclined position,

Figure 10 is a wiring diagram of the transmitting unit, 1

Figure 11 is a schematic view and wiring diagram of the recording unit, which is located at the surface of the well,

' Figure 12 is an enlarged transverse, vertical, sectional view taken on the line [2-4! of Fi ure 5,

Figure 13 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line l3-l3 of Figure 12, and illustrating the position of the photoelectric cells in dotted lines,

names:

said bore inclines. as well as the angle or inclination, in degrees. from the vertical, be ascertained. Successive readings are taken are variou elevations or points throughout the well bore and a correlation of such readings provides accurate information as to the direction and de- I gree of inclination of said bore.

In carrying out the invention, an orienting and transmitting unit '1 is adapted to be lowered through the well bore it on a flexible line or cable H. the well bore and passes over a pulley (2, after which the cable is wound around a drum I! located at the surface, whereby lowering and raising of the unit T is facilitated A lead wire or conductor 14 extends upwardly from the unit '1' through the-cable and has connection with a suitable indicating and recording unit R which is mounted at the surface of the well. The wire or conductor N is utilized to conduct the electrlcal current, which is necessary for operation of the unit T, downwardly to said unit, and is also employed for carrying the transmitted electrical impulses from said unit to the recording unit R, as will be hereinafter explained.

The orienting and transmitting unit T includes an outer shell or housing l5 (Figure 2) which has its lower end closed by a plug or closure i6, which is threaded thereinto. An inner housm IT is mounted within the outer shell and the operating apparatus and equipment of the unit is contained in this inner housing. The housing is held against rotation within the shell by an upstanding, transversely extending key I8 which Fi re 14 is an isometric view of the weight I assembly which controls the direction contact,

Figure 15 is an isometric view of the pendulous Weights- Figures 16, 17 and 18 are views similar to Figures 3, 4 and 5 and illustrating a modified form of the invention, I

Figure 19 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line l9--l 9 of Figure 1'1,

Figure 20 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 20-20 of Figure 17,

Figure 21 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 2 I--2l of Figure 18,

Figure 22 is an enlarged transverse, sectional view of the contact assembly and control means of the modified form,

Figure 23 is a diagram illustrating the opera tlon oi the parts shown in Figure 22,

Figure 24 is a wiring diagram of the transmitting unit of the modified form, v

Figure 25 is a schematic view and wiring diagram of the recording unit employed in the modifled form, and

Figure 26 is a schematic view and partial wiring diagram illustrating the hook-up when the oscillators and their associate parts are elimi- Y hated.

The general assembly In the drawings, the numeral 10 designates a 7 is formed on the plug or closure l6 and which engages a groove I9 in the underside of said housing. A metallic contact 20 is axially mounted within the top of the inner housing and is recessed to receive a contact prong 2i which depends from the center oi an insulating disk 22. The lower end of the wire or conductor H is electrically connected with the prong 2|. The prong is urged into engagement with the contact by a coiled spring 23 which is confined between the disk 22 and the underside of a cable or line socket 24, the latter being constructed in two sections and being threaded into the upper end of the shell l5. The lower end of the cable H is secured within the socket and a fishing neck 25 which is threaded onto the upper end of the socket surrounds the cable. A suitable packing 25 is confined within the socket and packs oil around the conductor which extends from the lower end oi the cable.

The unit T is lowered to successive positions in the well bore I0 and at each position, the unit T is operated. As will be explained, the operation of the unit transmits a plurality of electrical impulses to the indicating and record- 7 at successive elevations or points in the bore,

the direction and degree of inclination is accurately indicated.

The orienting and transmitting unit The orienting and transmitting unit is clearly shown in Figures 3 to 5 and, as explained, includes the housing- I! which is incapable of rotation within the shell IS. The housing is of The upper end or the cable extends from i 7 vicled with the groove it which receives the up standing key 8 of the closure I. The upper end of the plug 3c is formed with an axial recess 8!, which is countersunk to receive a bearing assembly 32. A pivot pin 83 which depends from the lower end of a rotatable casing II is confined within the bearing assembly and is freely rotatable therein.

The rotatable casing 34 houses that portion of the apparatus, which will hereinafter be referred to as the compass unit C, and said casing has an outer diameter less than the inner diameter of the housing ll so as to be freely rotatable therein. The casing is within the lower portion of the housing and has its lower end closed by a plug 85 into which the pivot pin 33 is threaded (Figure 5). The upper end of the casing has a cap 36 (Figure 4) threaded thereinto and said cap has an upwardly extending, tubular shank or sleeve 31, preferably made integral therewith.

' The shank projects through an axial opening 38 formed in a transverse partition 39, which is provided within the housing i1. Suitable bearings 40 surround the shank. and, manifestly, the inner casing 34 is mounted so as to be freely rotatable within the housing ll. A

The compass unit C, which will be hereinafter described, is housed within the rotatable casing 3 which is mounted within the lower portion of the housing l'l. Immediately above the casing, a contact assembly A, which is actuated to close electrical circuits to a transmitting apparatus, is mounted. A weight assembly W, which controls the position of certain of the contacts in the assembly A. is disposed above said assembly and in the upper portion of the housing I1, is the transmitting apparatus. This apparatus includes a trio of oscillators 0!, G2 and 03, which are supported on transverse partitions or decks U. The various transformers, filter reactors and other necessary electrical equipment, are also mounted within the housing H, as will be more fully explained.

The compass unit C within the rotatable casing 34 is arranged to control the position of the casing with relation to north, or any other desired azimuth. This casing has connection with lower portion of the rotatable casing '24 and includes a tubular shell or sleeve 4! (Figure 61,

which is secured within the casing immediate above the plug 35 which closes the lower end thereof. A block 63 is disposed within the lower portion of the shell. preferably having threaded engagement therewith, and this block is formed with an axial bore or opening M. A shaft l extends axially of the bore, being supported on bearings 4%, and the upper end of said shaft projects above the block. An arcuate supporting bracket or collar fl is secured to the upper end of the shaft and, manifestly, said bracket or collar is freely rotatable within the casing. A

weight a is fastened within the bracket at one side thereof and when the casing 34 is inclined as, for example, as it is lowered through an inclined bore, this weight always finds the low side, the bracket being rotated to allow said weight to move to such low side.

A magnetic compass 5B is mounted within the supporting bracket or collar 41 and includes a semi-spherical base 8| (Figures 5 and 12). The base is weighted and is plvotally secured to the bracket, the pivot points 52 being located diametrically opposite each other and being misalined substantially ninety degrees from the weight #8 of said bracket. With such arrangement, when the casing 36 is inclined, the weight 48 finds the low side, rotating the bracket 1 accordingly. At such time the bracket is inclined, that is, its side walls are off the vertical, but the weighted base 5i of the compass swings on its pivots E2 to maintain the upper surface of said base in a true horizontal plane.

The usual suspension pivot 53 extends upward- 1y from the base El and a semi-spherical shell 54 is mounted on the upper pointed end of said pin. Upward displacement of the shell is prethe contact assembly and the position of the castion in accordance with the direction and degreeQ- of inclination and, therefore, by transmitting the positions of said weights to the indicating and recording unit R at the surface, the trend of the bore is indicated, as will be hereinafter described in detail.

The compass unit base 5|.

vented by a sleeve 56 which depends axially from the shell and which has its lower flanged end engaged beneath a keeper 56 mounted on the The usual magnets 51a are suitably secured within the shell 54. The upper surface of the shell is of a dull non-reflecting surface except for a narrow strip or bar of light reflecting material 61. This strip or bar extends from the center of the shell (Figure 13) to the outer edge thereof and is disposed on the shell so as to constantly point in a predetermined direction. For the purposes of this description, it

will be presumed that the reflecting bar or strip Ul is always pointing north, although it could be arranged on the upper surface of the shell to point in other directions. From the foregoing, it will be obvious that when the unit T is lowered into a well bore, said unit will incline in accordance with the inclination of the bore. Also, since said housing is carried by the flexible line II, it may rotate as it is lowered. However, regard less of the rotation of the unit or of the inclination thereof, the compass ill maintains the reflecting strip or bar Bl on the upper surface of the semi-spherical shell 64 in a position or direction pointing north. r

The upper end, of the tubular shell 42 which houses the compass is closed by a cap member 83 which is threaded into said upper end. This cap member has a downwardly extending, conical sleeve 58 formed integral therewith and located axially thereof. The sleeve is reduced toward its lower end and has a suitable curved window 66 mounted therein. The window provides a closure to retain a suitable damping fluid for the munitcismountedwlthinthe'liwithinthecasinglgtheflmdbeing manifestly, the light rays pass through the window and strike the light reflecting strip or surface 51 of the semispherical shell 64 of the com- .msintained at the level indicated in Figure 5.

Plate or deck 82. The lower end of the sleeve terminates adjacent a prism 63 which is mounted in a transverse partition 44 and light rays which pass through the sleeve strike the prism and are directedthrough the window 80 above the compass. As is schematically shown in Figure 10,.the sleeve 6| has a pair of condensing lenses 65 at its upper end with a pair of proiecting lenses 66 at its lower end. A gate 61, of the usual construction, is interposed between the lenses E5 and 6S. Maniiestly, light rays from a source of light above the tubular sleeve 6i pass downwardly through the lenses which concentrate said rays on the prism 83, which prism directs the same through the window G0 and onto the light reflecting strip 51 of the compass shell 84.

As a source or light, an electric lamp '8, having a straight wire filament, is mounted above the tubular sleeve 8|. The lamp is insertable within a socket 69 which is carried by an insulated support l0 extending upwardly from the deck 62. A spring contact H engages the base of the lamp and serves to conduct electrical current thereto. When the lamp is illuminated, light rays are directed downwardly through the lenses and prism and are concentrated on the light reflecting strip 51 of the compass'shell; actually, an image of the lamp filament is projected onto the reflecting strip.

The light rays which strike the light reflecting strip 51 are reflected upwardly therefrom and onto a twin light sensitive element, such as a twin photo tube 12, which includes photoelectric cells 12:: and 122) (Figure 10). -A prism 63a. is interposed between the compass and the twin photo tube. The twin photo tube 12 is adapted to control a follow-up electric motor 18 which is mounted on a transverse support 14 within the casing 34 near the upper portion thereof. The

and 12b are normally located, one on each side of the light reflecting strip 87. when the compass is at rest with the strip 51 pointing north, then the light rays from said strip are directed between the photoelectric cells 72a and 122:, with each cell receiving an equal amount of light, such amount being insufllcient to actuate the relays controlling the motor windings 13a and 53b. If the shell 58 of the compass moves, with relation to the photo tube, so as to cause more light to strike one cell, then the motor winding controlled by that cell is actuated and such sctuation, as will be hereinafter explained, results in a rotation of the casing 34 to automatically cause alinement oi the cells 72a and 72b with the strip 51. In other words, the foliow-upmotor T3 totates the casing in one direction or the other so that the relative position of the casing 34 to the compass 50 is maintained. Forlmpartlng rotation to the casing 84 by means of the follow-up motor 73, the motor shaft r is provided with a drive pinion 80, which has a driving connection through a reduction gearing 8!, with a friction drive wheel 82. The wheel is mounted aione side of the casing 34 and has one side extending outwardly through an opening 83 formed in said casing. The periphery of the drive wheel rides on the wall of the outer housing ll of the unit T and has frictional engagement therewith. Manifestly, when the motor 13 is actuated to rotate the wheel in one direction or the other, said wheel imparts a rotat'on to the inner casing 34, such rotation being relative to the outer housing i1. Therefore, re-

gardless of the position of the outer housing l1, the position of the inner casing 34 is maintained fixed with relation to the compass and with relation to the point north.

The tubular shank :1 at the upper end or the I casing 34 extends through the supporting partition 39, as has been explained, and has an insulating collar or disk 84 secured thereon so as to be rotatable therewith (Figures 4 and 9). This disk has a contact 85 embedded in its upper surface near the periphery thereof and this contact will be hereinafter referred to as the "north" contact. The north contact is so located radially on the insulatng disk that when the light remotor has a double winding 13a and 1322 so that M its shaft may be rotated in either direction.

The electrical circuit, in whichthe twin photo tube and motor 13 are connected, includes a twin amplifying tube 15, a transformer 18, and

a trio of relays l1, l8 and 19, these elements through the relay 18. Thus, if the cell 120 is remore light, as reflected by the light restrip 51 of the compass, then the winding 13a is energized to rotate the shaft of the motor 13 in one direction; if the cell 12b is receiving more light, then the. motor shaft is rotated in an opposite direction. As is clearly shown in Figure 12. thellsh mp nsive ceLs 12a flecting strip 51 on the compass 50 is properly alined with the twin photo tube I2 and the casing 34 is stationary, said north contact is alined vertically with the strip 51, whereby both the strip and the contact 85 are at all times pointing north. If the unit T is rotated on its supporting cable, the compass shell 54 will naturally rotate with relation to the casing 34 so as to maintain its reflecting strip 5! painting north. Such mcvement of the shell 54 results in misalinement of the strip 61 with the photoelectric cells 12:: and 12b, whereby one or the other of the cells operates one of the motor windings 13s or 731) to actuate the motor and impart suficient rotation to the casing 34 to again aline the cells with the strip. Since the north contact is secured to the casing, the contact is moved therewith to maintain itin vertical alinement with the strip. Thus, it is manifest that the compass unit and its associate parts serve to hold the contact 85 pointing north at all times, regardless of the rotaton or inclination of the outer housing ll of the unit T. This north contact establishes a basis from which readings can be taken and calculations made to determine the direction and i 4 degree of inclination of the bore hole.

daxinimatnitw The electrical circuit, in which the twin photo tube 12 and the electric follow-up motor 13 are connected, is, or course, subject to variation and on term of hook-up is illustrated in Figure 10. In this figure. alternating current is supplied to the motor windings 13c, and "b by a supply wire let. The relay ll controls relay contacts "a which, when closed, completes the circuit through a wire 11b and through the winding 13a, to a common ground G: similarly, the relay it controls relay contacts lEa which, when closed, completes a circuit through a wire 18b and through the winding lib to the common ground (3. Obviously, when the relay 1'! is energized, the winding 12a is energized to operate the motor shalt in one direction, while energization of the relay 58 operates the motor in an opposite direction. The windings of the relays i1 and 18 are supplied with direct current by a supply wire is: through the plate circuit of the twin tube 1!.

The relay i1 is connected by a wire Ilc with one plate oi the twin amplifying tube I5, the grid oi which is, in turn, electrically connected through a wire with the photoelectric cell 72a. When sufilcient light is striking the cell, the relay is energized to close the contacts "a and energize the winding 13a. The relay 1! is similarly connected to the plate of the tube 15 through a wire 18c and a wire 15!: connects the grid of the tube to the cell 12b, whereby when sufiiclent light is directed onto this cell, the relay i8 is energized to complete the circuit to the winding 13b of the motor 73. When the compass shell is in a normal position, the light rays reflected from the strip 51 are directed between the cells so that neither receives sufilcient light to, actuate its relay. However, when the compass shell rotates relative to the cells, one cell receives more light and actuatcs its relay to rotate the casing 3t and re-aline the cells with the strip. In this manner, the casing 34 is maintained in the same position relative to the strip 51 of the compass and the north contact 85, which is carried by the insulating disk 84 secured to the casing, is always maintained in a position pointing north.

It might occur, in some instances, that the housing H and casing 34 will be rotated very rapidly, in which case the compass shell, in finding north, will move the reflecting strip 51 completely from beneath both cells 12a and 12b, with the result that neither could operate its relay to re-aline said cells with the strip. For rotating the casing 34 to again aline the cells with the strip 51 in the event the above occurs, the emergency relay 19 is provided. As shown in Figure 10, the relay is connected by a wire 18a.

to the relays l1 and i8 and is arranged to control relay contacts 1%. These contacts are adapted to complete the circuit to the winding 13b of the motor 13. The relay 19 is so connected in the circuit that when both cells 12:; and 122) are receiving light, at which time their relays TI and 18 are inoperative, the relay i9 is energized since it is, in fact, connected to both cells. Energization of the relay 18 holds its relay contacts'l9b open and so long as either or both cells are receiving light, the circuit through these contacts is open. However, in the event no light strikes either cell, the relay I9 is deenergized, allowing the contacts 1% to close the circuit to the motor winding lib, whereby the motor shaft is rotated in one direction to impart rotation to the casing. Such rotation continues imtil one of the cells 120 or 12b again receives the reflected light, at which time the cells actuate their relays to again allne the strip 51 with the tube 12. As soon as the light again strikes one or both cells, the relay 1! is again energized to open the contacts 18b. Thus, the relay i8 is an auxiliary relay to assure alinement oi the photo tube 12 with the reflecting area or strip Bl in the event no light rays are striking either cell.

The electric lamp 58, which provides the light rays which are directed onto the reflecting surface of the compass, is supplied with current The contact assembly The insulating collar 84 which is mounted on the tubular shank 31 at the upper end of the casing 34 forms a part of the contact assembly A. As has been explained, this collar has the contact 85 embedded in its top and said contact is maintained in a position pointing north by means 02 the compass unit C. A trio oi contact rings 86, 87 and 88 are secured to the periphery of the insulating collar 84 (Figure 9) and the former, 8B, is connected with the common ground G, whilethe latter two rings, 81 and 88, are connected to the supply wires I00 and i0! which supply current to the compass unit C. The rings are engaged by contact brushes 88a, 81a and 88a, respectively, which are mounted on a vertical post 89 which extends upwardly from the transverse partition 89. Maniiestly, the brushes and rings provide a means whereby current may be conducted through the rotatable member or collar Above the insulating collar 84, which carries the north contact 85, a rotatable disk 90 is mounted. This disk is constructed of electrical insulating material and is secured to the upper end of a rotatable shaft 5|. The shaft extends downwardly through the tubular shank 31 of the casing, being rotatable on bearings therein, and the lower end of said shaft projects into the upper portion of the casing 34. This projecting lower end of the shaft has a drive gear 82 thereon and said gear is in constant mesh with another gear 93. the latter being secured on a shaft 94. Bevel gears or pinions 85 and 88 establish a driving connection with the shaft oi an electric motor 81 which is supported on a I transverse partition within the upper portion of a casing 24. Alternating current is supplied to the winding 91a, (Figure 10) of the motor 91 through a wire I 06b which leads from the main supply line I00. The motor 91 is arranged to be actuated at a fixed or predetermined speed, whereby the disk is rotated at a predetermined spced, as for example, 5 R. P. M.

A spring contact arm 98, having a contact 9| at its outer end, is mounted on the underside of the disk and is arranged to ride on the upper surface of the insulating collar 84. The contact 89 is disposed in the same concentric plane as the disk. The contact arm is electrically con-- The other secondary winding of said,

nected with a collector ring I03 which surrounds the periphery of the disk. Above the ring I03, two additional rings I04 and I are secured to said disk and the three rings are engaged by spring brushes I03a, IIIIa and lilia, which brushes are carried by the vertical post 89. The

brush I031: is connected to the oscillator OI oi' the transmitting apparatus, while the brushes I000 and IIiSa are connected to the oscillators 02 and 03 of said apparatus, as will be more fully explained. Since the brush I03a, which engages the ring I03, has electrical connection with I 1 The collector rings I04 and I05 are electrically I connected to a pair of contacts I 06 and I01, respectively, and these latter contacts are mounted on the upper surface of the disk 90. The

contacts I06 and I01 are located adjacent each other and are alined vertically with the contact 59 on the underside of the disk; manifestly, since these contacts are, mounted on the disk, they rotate simultaneously therewith. The contact I06 is arranged to engage a contact plunger I06a, which is supported by a. flat spring, while the contact I01 is adapted to engage a similar contact element I01a, said elements overlying the disk 90. It is preferable that the contacts I06 and I0! have their upper surfaces slightly above the top of the disk, whereby the contacts I064: and IBM may be engaged thereby, without said contacts I064: and I01a riding on the top of said ring. This arrangement reduces friction and obviates the danger of the disk causing movement of the contacts IIIGa and Iflla to produce an inaccurate reading. When'the contacts I06 and I 06a engage each other, an electrical circuit to the oscillator 03 of the transmitting apparatus is closed, whereby an electrical impulse is generated and transmitted to the surface. Such impulse is representative of the direction or inclination oi. the bore I0, as will be explained. Engagement of the contacts I01 and I011: closes an electrical circuit to the oscillator 02, whereby names:

round the'sleeve and, manifestly, by means or said sleeve and the pivot pin, the weight is rotatable within the housing. Due to the fact that the weight I08 is ofi-center of its pivot points, it is obvious that when the housing I1 is inclined, the weight will find the low side. Such movement of the weight will impart a rotation to the sleeve IN, the rotation being in accord-' ance with the amount or movement of the weight.

The lower end of the sleeve II 4 has a radially extending arm II1 secured thereto and the contact I 060. is mounted in the outer end 01' said. arm. When the housing is in a vertical positicn, the arm I" and contact I06a are alined vertically with the north contact 85 in the collar 84. In such position, the contact I00 on the disk would engage the contact Nita simultaneously with the engagement of the contact 95 with the north contact 85. This would result in a simultaneous actuation of the oscillators OI and O3 and such actuation would indicate true vertical, as will be explained. However, it the outer housing I1 were inclined, then the weight I00, in moving to Ihe low side, rotates the arm H1 and misalines the contact IIlBc relative to the north contact 85. The number of degrees of this misalinement is representative of the number of degrees from north that the bore inclines, thereby indicating the direction of inclination.

For indicating the degree or angle of inclination, a second weight member H8 is provided.

This member includes a pair of arcuate weights which are secured together by a shaft 9. The ends of the shaft are iournaied in the arms I00 of the first weight (Figure 9), and the weight I08 is recessed at I08 to permit the arcuate weights to move therethrough. Obviously, the weights IIB form a pendulum and remain in a vertical position, regardless of the inclination oi the housing I1. An adjustable stop I20 may be provided for limiting the swing of the weights an electrical impulse is transmitted to the surface and this impulse is representative of the angle or degree of inclination.

The weight assembly For controlling the position of the contacts Mia and. [01:1, so as to indicate the direction and degree of inclination, the weight assembly W is provided and is mounted within the housing I1 above the contact assembly. This assembly in-- cludes a weight member I08 which has a pair of upwardly eatending arms I09 preferably made integral therewith. The upper end of the arms are connected by a crossbar IIO (Figures 9 and 14) which has a central upstanding pivot pin III. The pin is mounted in suitable bearings II2 which are disposed within a transverse supporting partition II3. As is clearly shown in Figure 9, the weight is oil-center with relation to the interior of the housing and has a depending tubular sleeve Ill which extends through a transverse deck IIS. Suitable bearings lIi sur- When thependulous weights swing they impart a rotation to the shaft 9 to which they are secured. This shalt has a bevel gear I2I thereon and said gear is in constant mesh with a bevel pinion I22, the latter being secured to the upper end of a. shaft I23. The shaft I23 extends through a vertical bore I20 formed in the weight I08 and also through the sleeve I, the lower end of said shaft projecting from the lower end of the sleeve. The projecting end of the shaft has an arm I25 secu ed thereto and the outer end of this arm has the contact I01a mounted therein. When the housing I1 is in a vertical position, the pendulous weights 0 are centered in the housing and, in such position, the contact IIi'Ia is alined vertically with the north contact and is also alined with the contact 26a. However, when the housing is inclined, the pendulous weights II8 swing with relation to the weight I08 and through the medium of the gears I2I and I22 and the shaft I23, the arm I25 and contact I01a are swung out of alinement with the arm H1 and contact asmoas As has been explained, the transmitting apparatus includes a trio of oscillators Ill, 02 and 03. Each oscillator, as is clearly shown in the wiring diagram in Figure 10, includes a triode tube I28, oscillation coupler I21 and condenser I28. The electrical hook-up of each oscillator is well known in the electrical art and it is not believed necessary to give a detailed description thereof. The oscillator iii is connected by a wire "331) with the contact brush Iflta, which is in engagement with the collector ring I03 on the rotating disk 86. .The oscillator 52 is connected by a wire I641) with the brush "34a, which brush is in engagement with the collector ring I85 01 said disk, while the third oscillator 03 is connected through a wire IEEb with the brush I653 engaging the collector ring I65 of said disk. The current is supplied to the transmitting unit through the wire I4 which extends downwardly through the flexible cable or line II. A filter reactor I 29 is connected in the wire I4o prior to the connection of said wire to a power transformer I33. A direct lead wire 25!! connects the line M with the brush 81a, which brush engages the collector ring 81 on the insulating collar 84.. As has been explained, the ring 81 is connected with the supply wire I and, thus, it will be seen that alternating current flowing downwardly from the wire I4 will pass downwardly through the wire 230, then through the ring 81 and finally to the wire I00.

The primary winding of the transformer I30 is supplied with the alternating current from the wire I4. The low voltage secondary winding of the transformer I 38 supplies the heater current to a rectifying tube I3I and also to the triode tubes I28 of the oscillators. The high voltage secondary output is rectified by the rectifier tube and is changed to direct current. This direct current is filtered by a filter condenser I32 and is then conducted by means of a wire m to the contact brush 88a. This brush is in constant engagement with the contart ring 38 of the insulating collar 84. The ring 88 is cirectly connected with the direct current supply wire Illl and, thus, it will be seen that a flow of direct current is conducted to the compass unit C. The direct current is fed to the oscillators ii to 03 by means of wires 202, 203 and 254, which wires have connection with the main supply wire 20L Vhen the cathode circuit to any one of the oscillators is closed through the action of the contact assembly, as has been explained, that oscillator generates a carrier frequency or an electrical impulse, which impulse is transmitted over a wire 14a, which is connected to the wire I4 in advance of the filter reactor I29. This electrical impulse is carried to the surface by the wire i4 and is then conducted to the recording unit R, as will be hereinafter explained. From the foregoing, it will be obvious that, as the contact assembly operates, the oscillators are operated to transmit electrical impulses to the surface. It is pointed out that each oscillator transmits an electrical impulse of a diiierent frequency, that is, the oscillator OI may generate a carrier frequency of 350 cycles, while the oscillator 02 may generate a frequency of 450 cycles, while the oscillator 03 may generate a frequency of 600 cycles. Thus, it will be possible to transmit the impulses simultaneously over the same wire. It is pointed out that the figures given herein with respect to the cycles are illustrative only and the invention is not to be limited to the same. as the frequency of the impulses generated by the oscillators is subject to variation.

The indicating and recording unit Any suitable type of indicating and recording unit B may be employed and one type which has been found suitable has been illustrated; however, the invention is not to be limited to the type shown. The indicating and recording unit R which is illustrated in Figure ll inc udes the movable tape I36, which is mounted on suitable rollers I36. The tape is preferably formed with perforations I3? along its edges, which perforations are adapted to be engaged by radially extending pins I38 formed on the rollers. One of the rollers I33 has its shaft extended and provided with a drive gear I39, which meshes with a pinion I40. The pinion is secured to the outer end of the shaft of an electric motor I, whereby the tape iEE may be driven at a constant speed.

A trio of styluses I42, I 43 and I44 are arranged to ride on the tape I35 and, as said tape moves beneath said styiuses, the latter form or imprint a trio of longitudinal, parallel lines on said tape. Each stylus is pivotally mounted on a pin I45 which is secured to a suitable support I46.

The stylus 42 imprints or forms the parallel line i4! on the tape and the outer end of said stylus is adjacent an electromagnetic relay I41. When the relay I4! is energized, a lateral movement is imparted to the inner or marking end of over the wire I5I and to the relay I41 to energize the same.

It is pointed out that the filter I49 is so constructed as to receive impulses of the frequency generated by the oscillator OI and, therefore, each time that the oscillator Oi is operated, the electrical impulse generated thereby is transmitted to the surface and energizes the relay I41 to swing the stylu I42 and form one of the offsets H21; in the line I42. be hereinafter explained, represents the azimuth or north point. r

The stylus I43 forms or imprints a line I43 which is located centrally on the tape I35. The outer end of the stylus I43 is adjacent a relay I41a, which is similar to the relay I41 in the circult of the stylus M2. The circuit for the stylus I43 is substantially the same as that hereinbefore described for the stylus I42, and includes the amplifier I48a, filter 9a and transformer I561 The transformer is connected to the wire I5I by a wire iSIa. The filter I49a for the stylus I43 is arranged to pass impulses of the frequency which are generated by the oscillator 03. As explained,

the oscillator 03 transmits impulses which represent the direction of the drift or inclination of the bore hole and each time this oscillator is operated the relay I41a is energized to swing the inner or marking end of the stylus I43, whereby an offset I430, i formed in the line I43.

The stylus I44 forms a line I 44' on the tape and has its outer end adjacent a relay I 41b. when the relay is energized, the inner or marking end of the stylus is moved laterally to form an offset 4a in the line I44. The circuit in which the The line I42, as will to the low side and such swinging of the weight relay lb is mounted includes an amplifi r b. a filter i452: and a transformer Iiiib. A lead wire I51 b connects the transformer to the wire ISI, whereby the impulses travelling upwardly over the wires I4 and I5I will pass to said transformer. The filter 9b which is connected in the circuit controlling the relay I "b is constructed so as to receive the impulses of a frequency which are generated by the oscillator 02. This oscillator, as has been explained, transmits impulses representative of the angle or degree of inclination and each time said oscillator is actuated, the relay Nib is energized. Such energization of the relay swings the stylus I so as to form one of the onsets I644: in the line I44.

From the above, it will be seen that the first stylus H2 is controlled in its operation by the oscillator Oi and the line N2 which is formed by this stylus is representative of the azimuth or north point. The second stylus H3 is controlled in its operation by the oscillator 03 and the line I43 formed by this stylus is representative of the direction of the inclination of the bore hole. The third stylus I is controlled in its operation by the oscillator 02 and the line I44 formed by the stylus I is representative of the angle or degree of inclination.

The operation to the power lines I52 and I52a and is also connected to the line It. A suitable ammeter I56 may be connected in the wire I in advance of the transformer. A filter reactor I55 is also connected in the wire I4 to prevent the electrical impulses, which are travelling upwardly along the wire, from passing to the transformer. Also condensers I56 are connected in the wires I5I, I5ia and i5lb to prevent the current flowing downwardly to the compass unit through the wire I from passing to the indicating and recording unit R.

Assuming that the device is lowered to the position shown in Figure l and a reading is to be taken at this position, it will be seen that the bore is inclined, whereby the transmitting unit '1 is also inclined in accordance with said bore. In

such position, the outer housing of the unit I is inclined. At this time, no current is flowing downwardly through the unit '1, and the device is permitted to remain for a brief period to permit the magnetic compass 50 to adjust itself and aline the reflecting strip 51 on the compass shell 54 in a direction pointing north. After the compass 50 has adjusted itself, the reflecting strip 51 may or may not be allned with the twin photo tube I2. depending on whether or not the casing 3 has been rotated during the lowering opera-.

tion.

At the same time that the compass 50 is adjusting itself, the weight assembly W automatically operates to swing the contacts Illlia and Illla into their positions in accordance with the inclination of the housing II. The weight I08. which controls the contact I06, swings on its pivot I08 rotates the arm III which carries the contact Iota, thereby resulting in an adjustment or movement of the contact relative to the rotating disk 90. At the same time, the pendulous weights H8, which control the position of the contact IOIa, are swung, whereby the contact iilla is ad- Justed or moved with relation to the contact i061: and also with relation to the disk 90. After sumcient time has elapsed for the weights and compass to adjust themselves, the device is in readiness for the reading to be taken.

In taking the readlng,-a manual switch at the surface is closed so that electrical current flows from the power lines $52 and lilo and downwardly through the wire or conductor It. This electrical current is alternating current and flows through the wire 260, then through the contact ring 8! of the insulating collar 84 (Figure 10) and then to the wire I08, and finally to the timing motor 91, follow-up motor I3 and power transformer E5, as has been explained. The current is rectified by the tube I 3i and is conducted through the wire 2M, through the collector ring 88 of the collar 84 and then through the wire IflI which leads to the relays Il, I8, I9 and to the tube IS. The rectified current is also conducted to the oscillator units OI, O2 and 03 through the wire 202, as has been explained. The leads to the common ground G connect with the third contact ring 86.

As soon as the switch at the surface is closed andthe current is conducted downwardly to the compass unit C, the electric lamp 68 is illuminated and the light rays therefrom are projected downwardly through the lenses 65 and 66 and then through the prism 63 onto the reflecting surface 5! of the compass shell 54. These light rays are reflected from the surface or strip 51 upwardly through a prism 63:: and onto the photoelectric cells 121: and 12b. Iffahe photo tube 52 is in proper alinement with the reflecting surface 51, then these reflected light rays will partially strike each tube, with the result that the follow-up motor I3 will not be operated. However, if the casing 34 is misalined so that more light strikes one or the other of the photoelectric cells, then that cell is actuated to energize one winding of the motor I3. Such energizatlon of the motor winding, as has been explained, ro-

tates the casing 8 until it is properly alined with s the reflecting strip 51. When the photo tube 12 is alined with such reflecting strip, which indlcates the north point, then the contact on the insulating collar 84 is also alined with said reflecting strip, whereby said contact is also pointing north. The provision of the photo tube I2, together with the projection and reflection of the light rays, provides a positive means to assure that the contact 85 is maintained in a direction pointing north.

When the electrical current was conducted downwardly to the unit T, the timing motor 97 was operated to start rotation of the rotating disk 90. As explained, this motor operates at a fixed speed whereby the disk rotates a predetermined number of revolutions over a. given period. As the disk is rotated, the contact 89 on its underside engages the contact 85* on the insulating collar one time during each revolution of the disk. As the contact 99 moves trlcal impulse of a predetermined frequency.

wire IE and then over the wire ISI to the relay I" of the recording unit R. when the relay I I61 is energized, the stylus I42 is swung to provide or form an ofi'set 2a in the line I42 formed by said stylus. Since the contact 85 is pointing north and also since said contact is engaged by the contact 89 one time upon each revolution of the disk 90, it will be manifest that each ofl'set I524: in the line I42 is representative of the position or direction north. The distance between the two ofisets M21: in the line I 42' is 360 degrees, since the disk 80 revolves one complete revolution after the contacts 90 and B are engaged. Since each offset Ina represents the direction north, it will be seen that hallway between said ofisets represents south, and from these representations any given direction along the line M2 may be determined.

As the disk to revolves, it also causes the engagement of the contact I05 with the contact Iota and such engagement of these contacts closes an electrical circuit to the oscillator 03,

whereby that oscillator generates and transmits an electrical impulse to the surface. Such impulse energizes the relay I410 so as to actuate the stylus I43, whereby offsets 3a are formed in the line 3'. These oifsets will be spaced apart 360 degrees and are representative of the direction of the inclination of the bore I0. That these oiisets represent the direction will be readily seen for, as explained, when the contact I061:

is alined with the fixed north contact 85, the

housing i1 is in a vertical position. Whenever the housing I! is inclined, it follows that the contact I560 is swung or moved circumrerentially with relation to the disk 90 because of the weight I08, which always finds the low side. The amount 01' inclination of the housing II will, of course, control how many degrees the contact IBM is moved relative to the fixed north contact 85. Therefore, when the position of the contact Iilia is changed with relation to the fixed contact 85, the contact I05a. will be engaged by its contact I06 either before or after the contact 99 engages the north contact 85. The diiference in the time of engagement of the contact i06a with relation to the engagement of the contact 85 will be indicated by the oilsets I 43a and I42a. As shown in Figure 11, the stylus I42 was actuated upon the engagement of the contacts 95 and 85. Due to the inclination of the housing i'l, the contact I06 did not engage its contact 05m until several degrees later and this number 0! degrees can readily be determined by comparing the offsets I43a in the line I43 with the 03- sets I62a. in the line I42. As illustrated, the offset 3a is substantially northeast because it lies between the point north and the point east on the tape. Thus, the offset I43a immediately indicates the direction in which the bore hole I0 is inclined.

As the disk 90 rotates, it also brings about the engagement of the contact I01 with the contact Iil'l'a. The latter contact is controlled by the pendulous weights H8 and has been explained hereinbefore. The degree or angle of inclination of the bore i0 and the housing I! is represented by the position of the weights II8 which always hang vertically from their shaft Hi. When the housing is in a true vertical position, the contact IIlIa is alined vertically with the contact I080 and lies in the same vertical plane. However, upon the inclination of the housing,

the weights II! swing so as to rotate the arm I20 which carries the contact I0'Ia, thereby varying the radial position oi said arm and contact with relation to the contact I Did, as is clearly shown in Figure 7. The number of degrees or the amount of this misalinement is of course controlled by the amount or inclination of therbore hole and, as illustrated. the contact IGBa is en- I gaged by its contact I08 in advance of the contact. iil'l engaging the contact Ifila.

As soon as the contact Iil'la is engaged by its contact Nil, an electrical circuit to the third 05- cillator 02 is closed, whereby an electrical impulse is transmitted to the surface. This impulse actuates the relay I411), whereby the stylus I46 is swung to form the offset I la in the line Mt. By comparing the point at which the oilset itaoccurs with the offset Ifia in the line I43, it is possible to determine the number 0! degrees difference between the contacts IBEa and I010. This diiierence in degrees is representative of the number of degrees that the housing is ofi true 7 vertical and, thus, it is readily determined at what degree or angle the bore hole I0 inclines.

Successive readings may be taken throughout the entire length of the bore hole I0, whereby an accurate survey of the same is had. The device is accurate and positive in its operation and may be quickly lowered and raised through the bore on the flexible line. It is pointed out that th provision of the tape I35 provides a means whereby the indications may be quickly interpreted and also whereby a permanent record is had. The first line I42 establishes a basis from which the other readings may be taken. That is, the line I 42' provides a means whereby the north point a may be definitely determined. The second line I43 is indicative of the direction in which the bore hole I 0 inclines and, by comparing the oilset I431: in this line with the oflsets 2a in the line I42, the exact direction of the bore hole inclination is had. The third line I44 provides a means 1 for indicating the degree or angle of the inclination and, by comparing the position of the offsets 6a with the ofisets I43c such inclination, in the exact number of degrees, may be determined.

The device is compact in construction and is mounted withir the outer shell I5 which is sealed against fluids, whereby any fluids which may be present in the bore (0 will not interfere with the operation.

The arrangement herein described permits the operating current to be conducted to the unit T over the wire I4 and also allows the impulses generated by the oscillators to be transmitted over the same single wire. In some cases, it may be more desirable to eliminate oscillators and various filters, in which instance separate conductors, or wires, are employed (Figure 26) to connect the contact assembly C directly with the recording 0 unit. With this arrangement, the engagement of contact 99 with the azimuth or north" contact 85, results in closing the circuit to the relay I ll,

The modified form v In Figures 16 m 25, a slightly modified m of v is illustrated in place of the compass 50 and also pulse upwardly to the surface and energizes the relay I ll of the stylus I 2, as has been explained. Thus, it will. be seen that as the disk I II rotates and causes the engagement of the contacts 9! and the fixed north contact 85, the stylus I42 is the weight assembly W is omitted, the direction actuated to form the onset 2a in the line In. and degree of inclination being indicated by other This operation is exactly the same as has been means. In this form, only two oscillators, instead described in the first form. of three are empioye For indicating the direction and degree of In place of the compass 50, a compass I60 is inclination. the upper portion of the disk I" is substituted therefor and is mounted in the lower 10 formed with an upwardly extendin co ar portion of the casing 34, as is clearly shown in This collar is preferably made oflnsulating mate- Figure 18. This compass includes an outer casing rial and is integral with the disk. Disposed I SI which has the tapered supporting pin I62 sewithin the collar and resting on the upper surcured axially thereof. A circular compass card face of the disk is a metallic plate I12 which has or disk IE3 is mounted on the pin I52 and is pro- 15 its upper surface suitably coated with a light vided with an elongate, radial slot I64 (Figure 21) responsive material I13, whereby the plate I11, therein. The slot I64 is arranged so as to point in eilect, forms a selenium or photoelectric cell. north at all times. The slot is disposed beneath The plate I12 has its underside electrically con-' an opening I65 formed in the top of the housing nected through a contact bar II with a contact or casing IGI and this opening is located beneath ring I75, which surrounds the disk I10 above the the lens-carrying sleeve 6|, whereby light rays contact ring I 03c. A similar contact ring I16 is may b projected downwardly through the opendisposed above the ring I75 and has connection ing and through the slot I64. The lower end of through a bar IT! with the upper surface or with the casing IBI is provided with an opening I66 the coating material I13. The selenium cell acts whereby the light rays passing through the slot as a resistance in the circuit and the amount of I56 may be projected downwardly onto the twin light striking the same varies its resistance. photo tube I2. Instead of being mounted above When light rays are projected onto the plate III, the compass and adjacent the lens-carrying the resistance of the cell is changed. I sleeve BI as in the first form, the twin photo tube The collector rings I15 and H6 are engaged by I2 is located below the compass and is arranged :m spring brushes I'I5a and Ilfia, which brushes are to receive the direct light rays rather than reelectrically connected through wires "SD and ilected light rays as inthe first form. Manlfestly. II6b with an operating relay III'. A suitable when the li rays are passing through the openamplifying tube I18 is connected in the relay s and as Well 8- t rough the slot I64. circuit. When light is projected onto the selesin-equ l a t o light is s ri g t e photoas nium cell formed by the plate I12, the change in electric cells 120 and 12b- Howe er, if he as resistance results in a change in the grid circuit 34 becomes misalined with the slot I 6 in the of the tube I18. whereby the relay H1 is ener- COmDESS 08rd 53, then one or the other of the gized. When the relay is energized, the relay photoelectric cells receive more light to actuate contact I18 closes the circuit through wires I'lla one or the other of the motor windings of the 40 and H8?) to the cathode circuit of an oscillator motor I3. The operation of the motor I3. 25- 94, whereby said oscillator is energized to transbeen explained, results in an adjust the mit a carrier frequency to the surface and to the casing 34,whereby the contact 85,whichismountrecording m as m b hereinaft r ed in the upper end of the insulating collar 84 plainecL s long as t relay "1' is i d, carried by S id n is maintained in a directhe oscillator is maintained in operation and it tion pointing north at all times. The results obis Qnly when aid relay is die-energized to open tained by this construction are exactly the same th Switch [13' t t t osciuator n4 ceases t as that of the first form, th main difference operate being that direct light rays, rather than reflected -1 m t m t 2 and djspgsed within t light rays, are utilizedtoactuate the photoelectric upstandin 1 is an opaque plate rm cells 12a and 1222. In both instances, the contact This m is elem-3y shown in Figures 20 and 85 is held in a position pointing north at all times. and has an opening [33 f m d therein The As has been point d e Weight assembly opening is of a predetermined shape and has one W, ogether with its associated parts, as Shown in side I M extending from the center of the plate 'to the first form, has been omitted and. i p c the outer portion thereof. From the outer end thereof, aplumb bob assembly P substituted thereof this straight side. the opening is curved gradi'or. This latter assembly includes a rotating n inward as shown by t numeral mm disk I70, which is somewhat similar to the disk jacent the inner end the straight Side the 90 and which is mounted on the upper end of the opening is abruptly curved as indicated at at shaft 9| which is controlled in its rotation by the An mum}. mirror "la is inserted within the timing motor The disk has a collector collar and covers the inner surface thereof. ring I830 secured thereon, which ring is en- For projecting light rays downwardly through ged by 8 brush mounted the post the opening I80 onto the selenium cell formed The brush IIl3d is simllartothe brush (03a illusby the plate 1 a plumb bob m4 is univer. trated in the first form and is connected to the Sally mounted within a depending collar "5 oscillator OI, which generates and transmits an which is formed integral with a partition or electrical impulse to the surface to indicate the support located within the housing The azimuth or north point. The contact ring I930 plumb bob is clearly shown in Figure 22 and is electrically connected with a contact :3, which includes a conical or tapered sleeve '51 which is is similar to the contact 99 in the first film! reduced toward its lower end. A lens I88 is (Figure 22). Manifestly, as the disk I10 rotates, mounted in the upper portion of the sleeve I", the contact 99' engages the contact to close an hil a, rojecting lens I89 is secured across the electrical circuit to the oscillator OI. This oscillower reduced end. interposed between the later generates and transmits an electrical imlenses is a gate I93, whereby a pinpoint or very In small beam of light is projected from the sleeve.

, I42 of the recording unit R.

, g act-mac The light rays are provided by an electric lamp i9l, which is suitably mounted in the partition I88.

When the housing I! is in a true vertical posl tion, the plumb bob i8 is hanging vertically, as shown in Figure 17. At this time, the light rays which are projected downwardly through the sleeve i8! strike the center of the plate I12. These light rays serve to close the electrical circuit between the contact rings I and I16, whereby the relay H1 is energized to operate the oscillator 04. So long as the parts remain in this position and the light rays continue to strike the plate E12, the oscillator would continue to operate and to transmit its carrier frequency to the surface. I

It is preferable that the point north or the contact 85 be vertically alined with the straight side I8l of the opening'iflii. However, this is not absolutely essential but it is necessary that the operator know the relative position of the contact 85 with relation to the contact 99' which engages such north point. When the housing I! is tilted or inclined. it follows that the plumb bob I84, which is universally mounted, will remain in a true vertical position, as is clearly shown in Figure 22. In such position, the light rays passing through the plumb bob will not be directed exactly on the center of the plate or disk (19. with the result that they may be projected onto the fiat surface of said disk or plate and will not reference is made to Figure 23. In this figure,

the position of the light rays projected from the plumb bob are indicated by the numeral i9i, while the position of the contact 99' is illustrated by the dotted line. Assuming that the disk is rotating in a counterclockwise direction, it will be seen that the contact 99' will engage the north contact 85 prior to the time that the light rays are permitted to pass through the opening 880. As explained. the engagement of the contacts 99' and 85 will actuate the oscillator iii and stylus Such operation of the oscillator and the stylus will result in the formation of one of the offsets 2a in the line M2. During this time, the light rays are not striking the plate I12 and the oscillator 04 is inactive. As the disk continues to rotate.'the straight side l8i of the opening approaches the light rays striking the top surface of said disk and, after the disk has travelled approximately 90 degrees (as illustrated in Figure 23), the opening I80 moves beneath the projected light rays. As soon as this occurs, the circuit is closed to the oscillator 06, whereby said oscillator is operated.

The oscillator 04 is arranged to energize a relay M'lc which is similar to the relays I41 to Hi'lb hereinbefore described. Associated with the relay Mic is a stylus 2c, which rides on the tape I35. This stylus is arranged to form a line I41 on the tape and, when the stylus is actuated,

an offset Mid is formed in said line.

Since the contact 99' engages the contact 85 once during each revolution, the distance between the oifsets 2a represent 360 degrees. Also, as

moves beneath the projected light rays. Thus, when the oscillator 04 is operated, the stylus i826 forms its oflset Id 90 degrees later on the tape I35. This indicates that the direction of I th number of degrees during which the opening has remained below the projecting light rays. In the position illustrated in Figure 23, the opening I86 remains below the projecting; light rays through approximately 139 degrees as indicated by the line i92. If the inclination of the housing was greater, the plumb bob would move outwardly or further from the center of the plate HQ. In such case, the opening would not remain below the projecting light rays as long, with the result that the line or offset Mid formed by the stylus i520 would not be as long on the tape I35.

By determining the length of the line (41d in degrees, it is possible to determine the position of the plumb bob with relation to the plate I" and. therefore, it is possible to determine the degree of inclination of the housing ii. The provision of the mirror i'iia makes it possible to reduce the diameter of the collar III, while increasing the efiective area which receives the light rays. For example, when the plumb bob swings to maximum inclination, the rays are directed onto the mirror and are then reflected onto the selenium cell. If the mirror were not provided, the light rays would miss the cell at maximum inclination of the plumb bob. It is pointed out that the invention is not to be limited to the particular shape of the opening I80, as illustrated. as, obviously, said opening may be varied in shape.

From the foregoing, it will be obvious that the direction in which the bore in inclines is indicated by the relative positions of the offsets Mia and the beginning of the oiIset Mid. This difference in degrees indicates the direction in which the bore is inclining. The length of the oiIset i-fld illustrates, in degrees, the length of time that the opening Hill has remained beneath the projecting light rays and this indicates the position of the plumb bob with relation to the housing and the plate il9. In this manner, the angle or the degree of inclination of the bore hole is definitely and accurately indicated. This form of the invention is particularly adapted for use in determining the inclination of a bore hole, where such.

, pass, may be employed.

explained, the disk or plate "9 rotates 90 degrees after the engagement of the contacts 99 and 85.

before the light rays strike the plate I12, because it is this length 0! time before the opening I80 The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory thereoi and various changes in the size, shape and materials. as well as in the details or the illustrated construction, may be made.

' within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2415221 *May 21, 1943Feb 4, 1947Halliburton Oil Well CementingWell surveying instrument
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Classifications
U.S. Classification33/312, 250/214.0LA, 33/313, 250/230, 346/33.0WL, 33/309, 318/480, 346/7, 340/870.19, 250/206.2, 318/675, 346/49, 346/33.00R, 340/870.12, 33/1.0SP
International ClassificationE21B47/02, E21B47/022
Cooperative ClassificationE21B47/02232
European ClassificationE21B47/022P