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Publication numberUS2317634 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1943
Filing dateJan 13, 1940
Priority dateJan 13, 1940
Publication numberUS 2317634 A, US 2317634A, US-A-2317634, US2317634 A, US2317634A
InventorsAnders C Olsen
Original AssigneeAnders C Olsen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building construction
US 2317634 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1943- A. c. OLSEN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 13, 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 "4 M 40 ff "1 i556 w T 6 A 0 5 f m ,3 a X 2% 1% J, R. 0 J 5 1% ma W w April 27, 1943. A. c. OLSEN 2,317,

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 15, 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 7?Z/72 {a 7", kl??? 6/6 719 Q 025 672 A. C. OLSEN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION April 27, 1943.

April 27, 1943. A. c. OLSEN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 15, 1940 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 VSNQMN kjfioiefis 0 016671/ 5y W- W v Patented Apr. 27, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Anders 0. Olsen, Gwynedd, Pa.

Application January 13, 1940, Serial No. 313,779

2 Claims.

This invention relates to an improved method and means for forming a wall construction, particularly with respect to partition systems, which is adapted for use in buildings such as ofiices and the like, wherein there is a definite need for partition systems which may be readily erected or disassembled for changing ofllce conditions.

This invention is concerned primarily with an improved method and means of installing and retaining wall slabs composed of materials possessing such qualities as fireproofness, soundproofness, and thermal insulation, and particularly for that type of wall slab which has base of insulating material and a facing of asbestos fibre and cement and is disclosed and claimed in the United States patent to Munroe et al. Patent No. 1,976,684, granted October 9, 1934, and which will hereinafter be referred to as a compositely formed panel construction.

This invention herein disclosed is a continuation-in-part of the application of Anders C. 01- sen, Serial No. 89,423 filed July 7, 1936, relating to Building structures. These slabs are applied to the spaced stud members in the walls or the partitions and are afiixed to adjacent studs, be-

. ing retained in place by various alternative but non-equivalent methods and means which do not impair the physical or structural characteristics of the slabs or of the wall or partition as a whole.

The principalobjeot of the invention is to provide a novel partition system wherein the erection of the partition or the like wall construction is simplified.

The principal features of the invention are that any panel can be readily removed to place a door without disturbing any of the partition members; borrowed lights or transoms may be readily placed in or removed from the partition system, and the partition may be erected with prepainted panels so that oflice partitions and the like may be erected overnight for occupancy on the following day.

Another object of the'invention is to provide a novel partition system adapted for interchanging ofiice space from larger to smaller units and vice versa, and incorporating certain features such as case in laying conduits and flexible cables, and telephone connections.

A further object of the invention is to provide a. novel partition system suitable for any height of a partition and particularly adapted either for a dwarf type of partition or for a ceiling height type of partition, incorporating such features as having the paneling readily removable and having such characteristics as being fire-retardant, thermal insulating, and soundproof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel partition system which will withstand the vibration incident to tall building structures such as is inherent to the modern ofiice building.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel partition system incorporating as a principal feature various forms of novel stud members wherein the studs are adapted for applying a removable partition panel adapted to be used in conjunction with battens for concealing the contiguous joints.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel building construction adapted either for interior or exterior finish purposes, and particularly adapted for buildings, such as: garages, bungalows, tourist camp cabins, and for partitioning off exhibit spaces in concessions, and the like, due to the simplicity in erection and because of the removable features wherein there is a high salvage value of the material forming the building construction.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel partition system particularly adapted for steamships.

Further objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment of the invention and of the modifications thereof, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters will indicate similar parts and where:

Figure 1 is a view in elevation illustrating the novel partition system which includes the doors, borrowed lights, transoms, and other known features incorporated in the usual partitions;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of a clip adapted for securing the wall slabs and a batten strip illustrated partially in section;

Figure 3 is a vertical sectional view through a portion of a stud illustrating a double partition and the securing clips for affixing the wall slabs to the stud;

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional view through a stud illustrating the method of securing the wall slabs to the stud;

Figure 5 is a horizontal sectional view illustrating a method of applying the wall slabs to a stud which is a modification of the stud illustrated in Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a horizontal sectional view illustrating a corner construction for a double wall partition;

Figure 7 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view illustrating a corner stud construction;

Figure 8 illustrates the method of applying the wall slabs to a stud which is a modification of the studs illustrated in Figures 4 and Figure 9 is a horizontal sectional view illustrating details of a typical stud construction and clip construction for affixing wall slabs to the studs, a detail of a typical corner, a detail of a partition intersection, and a detail wherein the partition intersects a wall;

Figure 10 is a vertical sectional view through the partition construction illustrating modified baseboard constructions and also details of an extension form of partition showing the detail at the fioor and ceiling;

Figure 11 is a perspective view partly in section illustratinga modified form of stud construction;

Figure 12 is a perspective view partly in section illustrating the method of applying the wall slabs. clip and batten to a wood stud construction;

Figure 13 is a perspective view illustrating a clip for applying wall slabs modified from that illustrated in Figure 2;

Figure 14 is a perspective view of a corner clip for affixing wall slaps to a comer stud;

Figure 15 is a perspective view of a clip adapted for securing wall slabs at wall intersections;

Figure 16 is a clip which is a modification of the form of clip illustrated in Figure 13;

Figure 17 illustrates a method of afiixing wall slabs varying in thickness within a predetermined range at vertical and horizontal joint intersections;

Figure 18 is a horizontal sectional view through a typical partition construction illustrating various comer details;

Figure 19 is a horizontal sectional view through a. partition illustrating the stud construction for a wall section;

Figure 20 is a vertical sectional view through a partition showing details at the floor and ceiling;

Figure 21 is a partial perspective view illustrating the details of a modified stud construc- 1 tion;

Figure 22 is a perspective view illustrating a clip for applying wall slabs, and the clip is formed in the same manner as the clip illustrated in Figure 13;

Figure 23 is a horizontal sectional view through a wall facing applied to furring strips and illustrating outside and inside corner details;

Figure 24 is a vertical sectional view of a wall facing applied to furring strips;

Figure 25 is a vertical sectional view through a partition illustrating a novel stud construction;

Figure 26 is a horizontal sectional view through a partition illustrating the horizontal section of the stud illustrated in Figure 25; and,

Figure 27 is a front elevation of a portion of the'stud illustrated in Figure 25.

Referring to Figure 1, there is illustrated a novel partition or wall construction primarily adapted for interior partition systems but which obviously may be used for exterior wall constructions. The partition 30 comprises the usual door 3| which may be of any type well known in the art. The partition also comprises the usual borrowed light construction 32, baseboard constructions 33, and crown molding 34. The

hardware comprising the doors, borrowed lights, and transoms are of standard construction, these will not be described in detail as it is obvious that the usual glazed or metal doors may be used and that standard borrowed light sashes and transom frames may be used with this novel construction.

Wall slabs 36 used in this wall construction are of standard width and height, preferably 24 inches in width and 8 feet in height, thus being adapted for standard dwarf type partitions and with the extension studs and sections therefor for ceiling height type of partition. When this partition system is adapted for a ceiling height type of partition, particularly'when using extension stud construction, it is preferred to use the construction disclosed and claimed in my copending application, Serial No. 313,778 filed J anuary 13, 1940, for Building construction. The wall slabs 36 used in this partition system preferably comprise an insulating portion or core 31, preferably formed from felted fibrous material, preferably bagasse or other lignocellulose materials. This insulating material may be sized by any suitableprocess but preferably is sized by precipitating on the fibres rosin size with alum. There is applied to the face of this core for ornamental purposes a facing or surfacing sheet, preferably of asbestos fibre and cement. The method of forming this sheet material is disclosed and claimed in United States patent to Munroe et al., Patent No. 1,976,684, granted October 9, 1934. It is, therefore, obvious from the illustrations, particularly in Figures 1, 6, 9 and 10, that there will be provided in a wall construction or petition system a wall construction which is not only insulating, but also which has an ornamental and weather-proof surface which also is fire resistant due to the asbestos fibre and cement coating thereon. It is also evident that this surface material may be suitably ornamented by painting where the surface is exposed, or left in its natural finish, or that there may be impressed thereon designs simulating brick siding or other forms of siding material. When used for an interior partition construction, it is preferred to either leave the facing material in its natural finish or to decorate the surface in colors suitable to the tastes of those using the ofiice space provided by the partitions, or if in a home or apartment construction to suit the residents thereof.

When the novel partition system as illustrated, and which will be further described in detail, is changed from the dwarf type of partition system to a ceiling height type as illustrated in Figure 10, extension slabs 39 formed from the same material as the main Wall slabs 36 may be utilized or it is obvious that the partition may be finished to the ceiling with other forms of sheathing or panels. This may include asbestos fibre and cement panels or other forms of felted fibre board and the like materials. Although this invention isbeing disclosed primarily with respect to the application of a type of material disclosed in the above mentioned patent to Munroe et al., nevertheless it is evident that this system is equally applicable for the erection of wall slabs of any other suitable wall forming materials known in the building art.

The slabs used for the surfacing of the finished wall construction are preferably affixed to studs 40 as illustrated in Figures 4 and 6 or affixed to modified constructions which function in the same manner as the stud construction 40 for affixing the wall slabs in position in the wall construction. In the construction which is to be described, it is not necessary to provide perforations, slots, or other patricular construction of the wall slabs for afiixing the slabs to the wall structure and therefore the slabs may be formed very cheaply in the sizes preferred for the stand ard height partitions, involving only the labor necessary to form the compound wall slab of an insulating material and a facing material. The constructions of the inventions hereof provide that the wall slabs may be readily erected on or detached from the studs when the partitions or wall constructions are to be rearranged for changing office conditions or when the partition or wall constructions are being taken down, thus providing that the entire system may be salvaged. The further details of the construction of the novel wall construction and particularly with reference to a novel partition system will be described by reference to the remaining figures in the drawings.

In erecting the partition, referring to Figures 1, 10, and 20, there is first laid a fioor channel 4|. In erecting the floor channel in place, it is preferred, as illustrated in Figures and 20, to apply to the fioor a strip of felted fibrous material 42 preferably impregnated with asphalt or other suitable material to form a seal between the fioor and the fiooring channel and also to provide a sort of sound-deadening construction in that any sounds transmitted to the partition will not be transmitted to the floor below. The asphalt impregnated material 42 is preferably applied to the fioor by applying a coating of asphalt or other adhesive material. The flooring channel is also provided with prongs 43 which extend into the sound deadening material retaining the flooring channel in position because of the weight of the partition. It is also obvious that the floor channel 4| may be secured to the fioor construction in the usual manner such as by the use of leg screws or expansion bolts. A furring strip 44, Figures 10 and 20, where a celling height type of partition is necessary, may then be secured to the ceiling construction 45 in the usual manner such as b the use of lag screws or toggle bolts. A ceiling channel 46 may then be secured to the furring strip 44 by any of the well known methods. The studs 40, Figures 3, 4, 6, and modified stud constructions may then be erected between the floor and ceiling channels 4| and 46 respectively. It is to be understood that the fioor and ceiling channels shall be levelled by methods approved in the art and also that the studs shall be set plumb.

After the fioor and ceiling channels and studs have been properly erected, aligned and levelled, the wall slabs 36 are then applied. With a standard partition construction, the fioor and ceiling channels may have suitable projections thereon for positioning the studs and to keep them in place or as indicated in my co-pending application, previously referred to, of which this is a continuation-in-part, the channels may have slots at standard intervals whereby the studs may be secured to the floor channel by suitable metal screws or bolts in a well known manner.

Referring to Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 20, the wall slabs 36 are erected in place by supporting the wall slabs on base clips 41, Figures 10 and 20, intermediate the studs 40. The base clips 41 are of an inverted U-shaped construction preferably formed from sheet metal and have symmetrically positioned recesses 48 for receiving and supporting the wall slabs 36. The clip ,41 is adapted, Figure 10, for the erection of a since the weight of the panels will cause th clip 41 to descend until it engages this member. When the panel is placed in position, it shall be so erected that the opposite edges of the panel overlying the studs will be substantially on the center lines of the studs. It is preferred to use only as many clips 41 as is necessary to support the weight of the wall slab and so that the baseboard panels may be erected in position with the ends of the panel overlying a clip so that they may be afllxed thereto.

It is preferred also that two contiguous panels shall be erected in place at the same time, that is, clips 5| shall be placed in position by inserting the clip 5| through a slot 52, Figures 3 and 4, or so that it overlies a transverse member 53, Figures 3 and 4, and forced downwardly so that a wedge-shaped portion 54 of the clip forces the clip inwardly, thus firmly afflxing the panels 35 in position against the studs, base clips, and ceiling channels as illustrated in Figures 3 to 10, inclusive, 12, and 18 to 26, inclusive. It is also preferred in erecting the panels 36 that the studs shall be adapted to receive all the clips that are necessary to firmly afllx the slabs to the studs and also to prevent any buckling of the slabs. It is also obvious that there should be only used a sufficient number of clips to maintain the slab firmly .afilxed in its erected position. The minimum number that shall be used is one at the top of the partition and one at the bottom for each stud member where contiguous slabs meet. After the panels have been erected in position, the partition assembly or wall construction is completed by snapping into position, as illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, an ornamental molding 55. The base panels 33 may then be assembled to the base clips 41, Figure 10, by means of prongs 56 formed on the clip 41 engaging kerfs 51 in the panels 33. This baseboard panel construction is preferably that disclosed and claimed in my above mentioned copending application.

An alternative baseboard construction is also disclosed in Figure 10 wherein the clip 41 has welded or otherwise secured thereto a baseboard retaining clip 58. The clip has deformed resilient upper and lower members 59 and 60 adapted to receive compleme'ntally formed members GI and 62 of the metal baseboard panel 49. It is obvious that the baseboard panel 49 may be erected in place by applying the member 6! over the member 59 and then snapping the bottom member 62 over the resiliently formed lower member 60. In erecting either one of the baseboard panel constructions, lt is preferred that they shall be erected before the application ofthe ornamental batten strips 55, although it; is

In order to erect the deiling moldings, it is preferred that clips 64 s all be erected in place on the furring strips in t e manner shown, Figures and 20, by the use or screws or other suitable securing means. and the moldings 63 snapped in place. The moldings 63 which are of standard construction are held in position by means of resiliently formed members 65 which engage complementally formed members 66 formed integrally with the ornamental molding 63. It is obvious that the molding 63 may take any form which may be economically rolled or fabricated and also that the clips 64 may be either formed as individual clips or as a continuous strip.

Although Figures 10 and have been described with reference to a ceiling height type of partition where the furring strips are secured to the ceiling, it is also obvious that this same construction is equally adapted for ending the partition at a height wherein the partition is called a dwarf type of partition, that is, it does not extend entirely to the ceiling leaving an open space between the top of the partition and the ceiling for ventilation and lighting of adjacent rooms. The dwarf partition is particularly for use in an office building where the ornamental ceiling and lighting fixtures are in place, and where it may be desired from time to time to change the partitions and it is desired not to destroy the ceiling construction in the rearrangement of the partitions. In such a case, a crown molding as indicated at 34, Figure 1, may be secured in position by first securing the furring strip 44 or other suitable structural member to the channel 45 and then erecting the crown molding in place which is comparable to the ceiling molding construction which has been described with reference to Figures 10 and 20.

The construction illustrated by the vertical sectional view in Figure 10 may also be utilized for changing over the dwarf type of partition to a ceiling height type of partition and also is illustrative of the method of applying horizontal ornamental batten strips 61 where it is desired to either add borrowed light constructions as illustrated in Figure l or for further paneling of the wall surface for ornamental purposes.

For erecting the extension construction in order to convert a dwarf type of partition system to a ceiling height type of partition, it is preferred to erect the furring strips M and ceiling channels 46 as previously described with reference to a ceiling height type of partition and affix extension studs, not shown, at the upper ends of the studs of standard height. These 4 extension studs have been disclosed and claimed in my aforementioned co-pending application. With the studs and extension studs firmly afiixed in position between the floor and ceiling channels 4i and 46, respectively, the horizontal batten strip 67, which was also disclosed and claimed in my said co-pending application, is applied at the upper end of panels 36 forming opposite walls of the partition assembly. The members 6'! are substantially T-shaped with resilient portions 68 adapted to grip the wall slabs. A clip 69 which was also disclosed and claimed in my said copending application is used to space and affix the panels 36 and panels 39 of the extension partition construction together and against the stud conthe remaining figures.

angles to the position indicated in Figure 10 and then inserted in the T-shaped member and turned to the position shown where it is obvious that the clip rigidly afiixes the opposite panels of the partition to the stud construction and space the panels at their proper distance apart. It is obvious that although this clip 69 and complementally formed batten member 61 have been used for the erection of extension panels to form a ceiling height type of partition, nevertheless this clip and battens are adapted for dividing the panel construction between studs into variegated ornamental panel constructions as illustrated in Figure 1, and that it also may be utilized for erecting borrowed light constructions in the partition system or wall construction.

As the preferred method of erection of the novel Wall construction and partition system has been disclosed in detail, the preferred and equivalent forms of the various elements of the construction will now be described with reference to Referring to Figure 2, a preferred form of clip 5! for afiixing the panels in the wall or partition construction is illustrated and is preferably formed from sheet metal which may be rolled into lengths of standard shape, individual clips being fabricated therefrom, or the clips may be individually fabricated as shown. The clip 5| is preferably of T-shape construction with an inwardly formed portion H, U-shaped in section having at the outer ends resiliently and symmetrically formed members 12 adapted to retain the ornamental batten strip 55 in position. The members 72 have formed at their outer ends members 13 adapted to resiliently engage complementally formed portions 76 of the batten strip 55. As previously described, the wedge shaped portion 54 is formed by a complementally formed slot 15. Referring to Figure 3, the slot 15 permits the wedge shaped portion 54 after it has been inserted through the slot 52, as best illustrated in Figure 27, to engage the stud or a transverse member 53, Figures 3 and 4, in order to firmly affix the slabs 36 in place in the partition assembly. It is obvious that the wedge shaped construction of the clip permits an increasing pressure to be applied on the wall slabs as the clip is driven downwardly on the stud.

Referring to Figure 4, a preferred stud construction is illustrated. The stud 40 is preferably formed from sheet metal and either rolled or otherwise formed into a substantially U- shaped section as is illustrated in the horizontal sectional view of the stud in this figure. The slot 52, as best illustrated in Figure 27, is punched or otherwise formed in the stud member and the number of slots formed in the stud shall be sufficient to firmly afiix a long panel of the material used without allowing the panel to buckle or warp in place. When the stud construction is usedin forming a double partition, as illustrated in section in Figure 3, a transverse member is afiixed between the legs of the stud 40, as best illustrated in Figure 4. This transverse member may be welded or otherwise secured in place, and it is preferred to afiix the member 53 so that its upper edge is opposite the lower edge of the slot 52. It is obvious that the wall slabs 36, as illustrated in Figures 3 and 4, may be securely affixed to the stud construction 40 in the same manner as th wall slabs 36 were affixed to the stud on the opposite face as previously described.

This novel means of ailixing wall slabs in juxtaposition and to a stud construction wherein contiguous edges of the wall slabs overlie and meet on the stud not only causes the slabs to be firmly amxed in place but also permits for any expansion and contraction of the slabs in the wall or partition construction. With changes in humidity, there is a tendency for the felted fibrous material of the wall slab to expand and contract and therefore it is necessary to provide means for not only firmly afllxing the slabs in position, but also to allow for some transverse movement of the slabs with respect to the studs.

Figure illustrates a modified stud construction which is similar in substantially all respects to the stud construction 48 illustrated in Figure 4. In this stud construction, however, it is preferred that a transverse member TI is welded in place between the legs of the stud by either are or by gas welding by applying a bead of metal 18 to secure the member H in position. structurally, however, the constructions illustrated in Figure 5 and Figure 4 are the full equivalents and have been illustrated to set forth a range of equivalents for the novel stud construction used in conjunction with the erection of this novel wall or partition construction.

Figure 8 illustrates a further modification 19, an equivalent of the stud constructions described with reference to Figures 4 and 5. A transverse member 80 over which the clip 5| may be wedged is preferably a stud having its ends riveted to the legs of the stud construction as at 8|. The stud construction 80 serves the same function as the transverse members 53 and 11 of the respective stud constructions 4|) and 16 previously described.

Figures 6 and 7 illustrate a partition or wall construction and particularly a corner construction. Figure '7 is an enlarged sectional detail of the corner construction in the partition system of Figure 6. As the regular stud construction in a partition of wall system has been described with reference to Figure 1 and corresponding figures relating thereto, only the detailed construction of a corner stud construction 82 will now be described. The corner stud construction 82 is preferably formed from sheet metal and fabricated as illustrated in Figure 7 substantially in the form of an octagon. One face of the stud, however, is formed by spot-welding or otherwise securing a transverse member 83 between contiguous faces of the formed stud which form the ends of the sheet material from which the stud is preferably formed.

This clip 83 also has a slot construction 52, best illustrated in Figure 27, for the reception of a clip such as 5| or other equivalent constructions for ailixing the wall panels in position. It is preferred that the stud construction shall also be perforated as at 52 so that a right angle construction at the corner may be obtained, that is, in four faces of the octagon, spaced 90 degrees about the octagon, the stud is formed with the slotted construction 52 for the reception of the securing clips which retain the wall slabs in position. It is also preferred that the stud construction 82 shall be formed with slots 52 at uniform spaced intervals along each face which is perforated and these slots shall be uniformly spaced in order to securely afllx the wall slabs at the corner construction.

It is also preferred that transverse clips 83 shall be uniformly spaced the length of the stud corresponding to the spacings of the slots on other faces of the stud. It is also obvious that this transverse member 83 may be formed similar to the members 53 and 11 in the stud constructions illustrated in Figures-4 and 5 respectively,

Welded or otherwise affixed to the octagonal stud construction are stud members 84 which function to space the panel members 38 the preferred width of the partition and are also adapted to be erected between the floor and ceiling channels as described with reference to Figure 10. The stud members 84 may also be only short members uniformly spaced along the main stud construction 82 but should, however, be placed so that they may be assembled where they are in juxtaposition with the floor and ceiling channels to firmly secure the corner stud construction at the junction where the floor and ceiling channels come together to form a stud construction. With this form of corner stud construction it is obvious that it is not necessary-to run either the floor channels or the ceiling channels together where they respectively intersect at the corner, but that they may be left short of the corner, but, however, should extend so that the stud members 84 may be erected between their respective floor and ceiling channels.

To complete the assembly of the partition system at the inside corner and outside corner, an ornamental molding 85 may be aflixed in place in the same manner as the moldings 55 have been erected, by snapping the molding over the outside corner securing clips 86 which have been erected in the same manner as has been previously described for the erection of the clips 5| in the wall construction illustrated in Figures 1 to 6, inclusive. The clip 86 is similarly formed as the clip 5| with the exception that the members 12 of the clip 5| in the modified clip construction 86 are formed as illustrated by the reference character 81, Figures 7 and 8. With this construction of the clip, the members 81 are therefore so formed that when erected resilient end portions 88 of the clip corresponding to similarly formed members 13 of the clip 5| are at right angles to each other rather than lying in the same plane. Complementally formed members 14 which are similar to the members 14 of the ornamental batten strip 55 are formed complemental to the resilient end portions 88 of the clip 86 and are therefore adapted for resiliently afiixing the molding 85 in place. It is obvious that, when the molding 85 is snapped in position, a very neat outer corner joint is formed at the corner construction, and that the panels 36 forming the outer wall construction are firmly affixed to the corner stud construction 82.

As has been previously described for the outer corner construction for securing the wall panels 36 into position, there will now be described the novel construction for securing the panels forming the inner wall construction at the inner corner intersection. An inner corner clip 88 has the wedging construction thereof similarly to that of clip 5| and is illustrated in detail'in the perspective view of Figure 14. It is to be understood that the wedging construction 54 of the clip 86 is also the same as that illustrated with respect to a clip 98 in Figure 14 which is a modified and preferred form of construction of the clip 89, Figure 7. The clip 88 is symmetrically formed and has formed thereon members 8| which are angularly formed as best shown in Figure 7 but which function in the same manner as the members 1.2 of the clip 5| for retaining contiguous wall slabs 36 in a co-planar relationship. Resilient end portions 82 are also formed on the ends of the members 9|, and these end portions,

portions 89 of the clip 96, are formed at right angles with respect to each other in order to affix the. panels 39 forming the inner corner construction of the partition system.

As previously described withv respect to the outer corner construction, an inner corner and ornamental molding strip or batten construction 93 maybe applied over the clips 89 to finish the inner, corner construction. Complementally formed portions I4 which are similarly formed as described withrespect to the batten strips 55 and 85 are formed complemental to the resilient end portions 92 inorder to resiliently affix the ornamental molding 93in, place. The'clip 89 is applied. in the same manner and wedged into place as has been previously described with respect to the clip 5 forsecuri'ng the panels in juxtaposition with respect totheir respective studs when'the panels are securegiin co-planar relationship.v p

With the novel corner construction comprising the normal stud and the inner and outer corner construction clip andmolding construction, it is obvious that a partition or wall construction emfaces of the partition intersecting at various angles. v I

Referring to Figures 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, and 15,

l the novel wall and partition construction will be described in conjunction with the use of a modified stud construction and also modified clip constructions for securing contiguous panels in juxtaposition with respect to their respective stud constructions. A preferred modified stud construction 94 is illustrated in sectlonfin Figure 9 and in a perspective view in Figure 11. It is preferred that the stud 94 is formed from channel sections 95; and, although the channels in Figure 11 have been illustrated as being solid, nevertheless, it is obvious as illustrated in section in Figure 9 that there may be formed therein cut-out portions 96 and channels so formed are known to the trade as Bar Z channels and these.

may be formed either by punching out the sections so that the remaining metal looks like a Z or'they may also be formed by slitting and ex panding the material forming a light weight channel member particularly when a light weight stud construction is desired.

The channel members 95 are joined together by a member 91 which is substantially U-shaped in section, as shown in Figure 11, and the channels 95 are preferably welded or otherwise afixed to the member 91. It is preferred that the member 9I has slot portions 98 formed therein as illustrated in Figure 9, or it may be formed with ya single slot 99 as illustrated in Figure 11. It

is obvious that the slot construction as illustrated in Figure 9 is preferred because of the additional rigidity had because of the greater amount of metal remaining in the member 91. The slots 98 and 99 are positioned from the face of the stud formed by the legs of the channel a distance determined by the wedging action of the wedge construction 54 of the securing clips 5|.

It is preferred to use, however, a clip construction I99 modified from the clip construction 5I,

- as previously described with respect to Figures 2,

as previously describedwith respectto the end 3, 4, and 5. Referring to Figures '2 and 13 the modified and preferred form of clip'construction I99 will be described with reference to thesetwo figures showing both the original and preferred form of clip construction. It is obvious from Figures 2 and 13.'that theclips are the full equivalents of each otherybut that the modified clip I99 provides a more resilient action in aflixing the panels to the studs because of the fact that resilient end members I9I are'formedopposite'to the members 13 which serve thesarne functionas the members I 9|, that'is, to resiliently afilx the batten strip 55; but; as previously described above, a moreresilient clip is formed by modifyingthe clip 5I according to the clip construc tion I99; i The clip I99 is also formed substantially as a T-shaped member having an inwardly'formed portion II' corresponding to that of clip 5|, whichQhoweVer, has been sheared as at I92 to lighten the clip. The clip has similarly formed slot construction I5 in the wedge shaped portion 54 adapted to be wedged in position in the same manner as has been described with respect to'the clip 5| in erecting panels 36 to the various stud constructions, such as 49 and I5, Figures 3, 4, and 5.' The clip I99 also has resilient and symmetrically formed members I93 similar to the members I2 previously described. Referring to Figure 9, it is therefore evident that, by the use of "the clips I99 and the studs 94 the panels 39 in the wall and partition construction may be erected in co-planar relationship in the same manner as were the panels 39 erected using the stud construction 49 and the clips 5|. The principal advantage of the modified stud construction is in its lightness and of the modified clip construction is in the additional resilient action obtained by reversing the end members IN.

A typical wall construction or partition assembly will be described particularly referring to the construction illustrated in Figure 9. Stud constructions 94 may beerected adjacent to an unfinished wall utilizing the studs 94 to fur out from the wall. It is preferred to use a flooring channel in conjunction with the furring stud construction and after leveling the flooring and ceiling channels to place the stud constructions 94 and then apply the facing panels 35 adjacent to the rough masonry construction or the like wall construction. The panels 36 may be secured in place by bolting, or the panels may be member to which there is welded a transverse member I99 having resiliently formed end portions I99. It is preferred that the stud construction I95 shall be affixed to the panels 96 when applied in this manner by securing the stud with I the securing means passing through the member I98, the panels 35 to be secured to the stud construction 94, as illustrated. Also when a partition is formed in this manner to run perpendicular with respect to the main wall of a building and the like, the stud members I95 and the stud constructions 94 which are also used in conjunction therewith or other modified forms of stud constructions such as previously described, shall be erected in conjunction with a flooring channelv 4| and the ceiling channel 46, as illustrated and described with respect to Figure 10, if a celling height partition is desired; otherwise, it shall be constructed to conform with the method disclosed for the erection of a dwarf type of partition construction. As the intermediate coplanar forms of the partition have been described with respect to Figures 1, 3, and 6, there will be no need of describing the particular method of erecting the panels intermediate theends of the partition and where a partition joins to form an intersection with a partition construction at right angles thereto or at any other angle necessary to form the boundaries of the rooms or other forms of cubicles into which a particular floor of a building is separated. In order to complete the construction wherein the partition intersects with a panel construction adapted for facing a wall of a building or even to form an intersecting partition construction, it is preferred to afiix the panels 36 of the main wall facing of the partition structure by applying securing clips IIO as best illustrated in Figures 9 and 15.

The clip is best illustrated in Figure 15 showing a perspective view of the clip. The clip H0 is substantially L-shaped in section with a portion of the base III reversed upon itself to form a resilient member. An upwardly extending leg II! is formed as illustrated in the plan view in Figure 9 and in the perspective view, Figure 15. The other end of. the base III is formed at a slight angle to increase the resiliency of the clip member. The base portion III is similar in construction to the inwardly formed portion 'II of the clip 5| and therefore has the wedge shaped portion 54 of the slot construction I0.

In applying the clip I I0, it is erected in place in th same manner as that described with respect to the use of clip 5|, and it is wedged downwardly over the U-shaped clip member I01, thus aflixing the panels 30 at an end thereof to the stud I05. It is also to be understood that, in erecting the partition system as illustrated in Figure 9, the usual base clips 41, as were described with respect to Figures 1 and 10, are also used. It is also Junction with the member Ill the inner corner and ornamental molding 93. The molding 93 is that described with respect to the partition construction illustrated in Figures 6 and 7 and is applied in the same manner over the clips H0 as was described in applying the molding with respect to the construction illustrated in Figures 6 and 7.

It is preferred that these clips shall be formed both as right hand and left hand clip members respectively, H0 which has been described, and H0 which is applied opposite to the clip IIO when forming a partition construction. As the parts of the clip IIO are similar to those described with respect to the clip IIO, but of opposite hands, like reference characters will be.

used to describe the same parts. The clip H6 is also erected in the same manner as the clip H0 in order to affix the panels 38 to their respective stud constructions.

lit is preferred to erect the partition construction where a partition is formed between two rooms and the outer walls of the room as shown in the upper right hand portion of Figure 9, although it is to be understood that even this intersection may be, formed as that shown and described with respect to the upper left hand portion of Figure 9. As previously described, it i preferred to erect the stud 95 by the use of a flooring channel and ceiling channels if a ceiling height type of partition is desired, and it is preferable that the stud ll shall be erected at the intersection of the respective partitions.

A preferred form II! of an intersecting stud for erecting thereon the intersecting partitions will now be described. This stud III preferably comprises three bar 2 channel members H8, two of which are substantially parallel and spaced apart as shown in Figure 9, while the third is at right angles to the other two members. stantially U-shaped in construction and the completed stud is formed by welding or otherwise aflixing a U-shaped member H9 at vertically spaced intervals to join the members H8 together into the completed stud III. In order to stiflen the stud I I1, the member H9, where the inner corners of the partitions intersect,- has flanged portions I20 formed thereon.

The contiguous panels at the inner corners of the partitions are then afiixed in position by applying the corner clip 90. This clip is a modified form of the clip 89 which was described with respect to the corner stud construction illustrated in Figure 7. The clip 90 is shown in detail in the perspective view, Figure 14. The clip 90 is preferred over the construction of the clip for the same reasons that were pointed out for the preference of the clip I00 over the clip BI. With the clip 90, additional resilience is secured for affixing the panels in position as the clips are wedged in place.

The clip preferably comprises the usual wedge shaped portion 04 and slot construction IS. The inner wedzing portion II is reversed upon itself as previously described with respect to the other clips and at the outer ends are symmetrically and resiliently formed members III. These members, as illustrated in Figure 9, are at right angles to each other in order that the partitions intersecting at right angles may have their wall panels 00 aflixed to the stud members I" of the intersecting stud construction Ill. At the outer ends of the members I2I are formed the resilient end members IOI which function in the same manner as the members IIII of the clip I00, that is, to resiliently afiix the panels in position and to form a construction for aiiixing the inner corner and ornamental molding strips 03.

The molding 93 has been previously described and its complementally formed members 14 are adapted to be resiliently affixed to the members I M of the clip 90. The panels 36 at the corners of both partitions where they intersect at their Inner corners, are then erected on the studs 95 and the stud construction H1, and are firmly affixed in position through the use of the clips 90 and the molding strips 93. The panels forming the outer wall may also be applied in the same manner and may be firmly afiixed by the use of the clips I00 which have been previously described.

Referring to the lower right hand corner of Flame 9, a modified corner stud construction I22 will be described. The corner stud construction III preferably comprises two bar 2 The stud II! in its final form is sub channels II8 placed substantially at right angles to form an L-shaped stud, and the corner stud is completed by welding or otherwise securing along the stud at uniformly spaced distances members I23 which are similar to a leg portion of the member II9 previously described. The member I23 has formed thereon the flange portion I for stiffening the stud construction as described with respect to the stud Hi. In erecting the stud I22, it is also preferred that the stud members II8 shall be set in a flooring channel H8 at their lower ends and also if a ceiling height type of partition is desired that they shall be secured to a ceiling channel 41 as has been previously described with reference to Figure 10. In the same manner as was described with respect to the intersecting stud construction I", clips 90 and moldings 93 are used to firmly aflix the contiguous panels 36, where they form the intersecting corner construction, to the stud members II8.

To complete the corner construction illustrated in Figure 9, it is preferred to use a corner member I24. The corner member I24 is best illustrated in section in Figure 9 and is of sufiicient length to extend between the floor and ceiling or to the height to which the partition is erected. At the bottom and top of the corner members I24 are welded or otherwise secured clips I25 which are substantially an inch in width and are so positioned on the corner member I24 that they engage and are adapted to be positioned between the flooring and ceiling channels H and 46. It is to be understood that, although it has not been illustrated, the clips I25 may be secured to the legs of the flooring and ceiling channels in any suitable manner to cause the corner member I24 to be rigidly secured in place in the partition system. Clips I26 are uniformly secured to the corner member I24, and an outer ornamental molding 85, which has been previously described with respect to Figures 6 and 7, is firmly aflixed in position thus completing the construction of the partition system using stud constructions and clip constructions modified from those previously described.

Figure 12 illustrates a form of wood stud construction wherein the usual wood stud hasbeen modified to be adapted for use with the novel clip construction of this invention. Figure 12 will be described with reference to the clip construction 5I previously described with reference to Figures 2, 3, 4, etc. It is obvious, however, that this stud construction is equally as well adapted for using the various modified forms of clips for corner constructions or for modified wall constructions, and that wooden studs may be formed to func-- tion in the same manner as the metal stud constructions which have been previously described. In order to affix the panels 36 in a panel construction using wood studs I21, slots I28 are formed in the stud and uniformly spaced along the length of the stud. The depth of the slot I28 shall be such that the slot will readily receive the leg portions II of the clip 5|; and, in order that the wedging action of the clip may be utilized for affixing the panel members 36 to the stud I21, a member I29 is affixed in the stud and is placed transverse of the slot I28, as illustrated in Figure 12. As illustrated, the member I29 may be a common nail or any other suitable member such as a steel pin or rivet. It is therefore obvious from the description of this modi-- fied stud construction that wherever wood construction is not objectionable in partition sys tems such as in frame dwellings that this modified stud construction may be satisfactorily used and adapted for aflixing wall panels in position.

As Figures 13, 14 and 15 have been previously described with respect to the novel partition systems with which they are adapted for affixing panels to stud constructions, a further description of these figures is unnecessary.

Figure 16, however, illustrates a modified clip construction I30. This form is made from sheet metal the same as the clip constructions 5|, I00. and the like, but is a cheaper construction and is equally as eificient as the other clips and serves the same function of aflixing the panels to the studs and also for attaching the usual ornamental batten strips. The clip I30 also has the usual wedge construction 54 and the complementally formed slot construction I5 allowing the wedge shaped member 54 to be mounted over the various members which are transverse with respect to the wedge 54 and which are formed on the studs in order to adapt the clip for afiixing the panels in place. The clip I30 also may be considered substantially T-shaped in construction as the clip 5|, but has alternately positioned portions I3I which have been formed from the same sheet of material as the clip I30 and with the planes of these members I3I formed so that they are substantially co-planar. It is obvious, however, that these members I3I may also be formed with resilient constructions I3 and IOI as has been described with reference to the clips 5| and I00, Figures 2 and 13. The width across the members I3I is such that it will be adapted to resiliently afiix the usual form or modified forms of bat-ten strips thereto.

Figure 1'7 illustrates a construction which may be utilized with this invention wherein it is necessary to form intermediate joints between the main panels particularly where it is desirous of obtaining further ornamentation by arranging the battens and panels in suitable designs. Contiguous edges of the panels 36 are preferably secured together by a U-shaped batten strip and securing member I32. The batten strip I32 is symmetrically formed and preferably has a depending portion I33 adapted to be inserted between the contiguous panels and has laterally extending portions I34 at right angles thereto. The batten strips I32 are preferably secured on opposite faces by means of a securing means I35 preferably comprising the usual bolt and nut as illustrated. It is obvious that with this construction the panels are securely affi-xed together yet it permits the lateral and longitudinal expansion of the panels which takes place because of changes in humidity or temperature changes.

The construction illustrated in Figure 17 is particularly well adapted, when the panels 36, formed as described or from other suitable material, are formed into a suitable form partition construction, so that the batten strips I34 may serve as the studs and may be erected into a partition wherein the composite board having facings on each surface forms the partition, that is. there is formed a similar facing 38 on the opposite side of the material. However, the form illustrated in Figure 17 is adapted in order that a partition system may be erected having as a surface the pattern of the felted fibre wall while in another oflice space or room there is another surface of asbestos fibre and cement. This form is particularly adapted in order that, as in Figure 17, the facing 38 may illustrate that the outside of the sheathing faced with asbestos fibre and cement may be exposed to the weather while the inside surface having a facing of felted fibre is the interior wall surface of a room. To further ornament the Joint construction, an additional ornamental strip I36 may be applied on each side of the joint construction. Obviously if the panels 36 form only one face of the partition construction, as illustrated in Figure l and 9, there is no need of adding the inner strip I36. The ornamental strip I36 also serves to cover over the securing means thus making a joint which is pleasing to the eye.

Figures 18, 19, 20, 21, and 22 illustrate a modified form of partition construction involving the compositely formed panel constructions of more than one material together with a modified form of stud construction and form of corner members for completion of the partition assembly. Referring to Figures 18, 20 and 21, it is preferred to erect studs I31 in the same manner as the studs 40, I0, etc. which have been previously described. Figure 20 illustrates the preferred construction in a ceiling height type of partition wherein the studs I3! are erected between the floor and ceiling channels H and 4G and secured thereto. The stud I31 is preferably known as a light weight stud construction formed from sheet metal by rolling, by a brake, or by other suitable methods. The stud preferably has perforations I38 formed on the base legs of the U-shaped stud I30 as best illustrated in Figures 20 and 21 which are of substantial size and are primarily used for lightening the stud but the perforations are also adapted for affixing the clips I to the studs I31 for securing in position the panels 35. The perforations I 38, while larger than the slots 52 as illustrated in Figure 27 and described with reference to previous stud constructions, are for the same purpose, that is, for affixing the clip to the stud, but with the additional purpose of lightening the stud construction. Other perforations such as at I39 may be formed in the stud and those at the upper and lower ends of the studs are primarily adapted for affixing the studs to the flooring and ceiling constructions and have been uniformly perforated throughout the stud construction so that shorter studs may be formed from the longer stud members wherever modified stud constructions are necessary. The stud. also has inturned members I40 which act as a face for panel members on the opposite side of the stud to abut against.

Figure 18 particularly illustrates a partition system erected by the use of these studs in conjunction with the preferred form of clip I00. In this modified stud construction, it is only necessary to use the one form of stud construction I31 and the one form of clip I00 in conjunction with the ornamental batten strips 55. Where the partitions intersect to form inner and outer corner constructions, inner ornamental corner constructions HI and outer ornamental corner constructlons I42 are used. Referring to the upper right hand corner member I4 I, this corner member will be described in detail. The member MI is ofsuch a size as to extend between contiguous studs as they are positioned to form an intersecting partition. The outer face of the ornamental strip Hi may be suitably decorated although for the purpose of maintaining the corners rounded for ease of cleaning it is preferred that the strips shall be perfectly smooth as illustrated in Figure 18. The corner members are symmetrically formed and are substantially L-shaped in construction having symmetrically formed legs I43. The legs at each end thereof are formed in substantially a U- shaped construction and are formed substantially transverse thereof with the same thickness as the panel member 36, as illustrated at I44.

The outer ornamental corner construction is similar to the inner ornamental corner construction with the exception that one is the reverse construction of the other. Therefore, legs of the corner construction I42 correspond to the legs I43 of the inner corner construction, and the members I46 are formed in the same manner as indicated at I 44 for the construction. l4! so that the thickness across this U-shaped end portion is substantially that of a panel construction 36. It is obvious that the studs throughout the wall or partition construction are erected with the aid of floor and ceiling channels although they ar not illustrated in Figure 18 for the purpose of clarifying the illustrations. After the studs have been erected, the panels 36 are also erected in conjunction with the base clips 41 as illustrated in Figure 20; and, the panels 36, Figure 19, where the partition system is entirely co-plan ar, are erected on the studs I31 and affixed thereto by the use of the clips I00 and the complementally formed batten strips 55, as best illustrated in Figure 19. Wher ever corners either inner or outer are formed at the intersections of the partitions where they form hallways or ofllce space rooms and the like, the corner constructions are erected as has been previously described with reference to Figure 18 by ailixing a contiguous panel I3 and the inner corner member I4I or an outer corner member I 42 and contiguous panels to a stud with the use of the clips I00 and batten strips 55. As illustrated in Figure 18, it is preferred to form an outer corner construction simply by utilizing the stud I31 and an outer corner construction I42 while, at the intersection of two partitions, it is preferred to utilize as illustrated three stud members and two inner corner members I4I .secured in contiguous relationship to the stud constructions as illustrated by the use of the clips I00 and the batten strips 55.

Figures 23 and 24 illustrate a method of construction utilizing the panels 36 and clips I00 for facing either the inner wall of a building or an exterior wall thereof. Figure 23 illustrates a construction wherein a facing is applied at a plurality of corners. It is preferred to fur out from a wall construction I" with furring strips I48 either erected vertically or horizontally as illustrated in Figures 23 and 24. To apply the paneling construction about an outer corner, it is preferred to erect a stud construction I49 furred out from the wall I41 by means of the furring strips I48 and which also may be in turn aflixed to the furrlng strips, thus securing the corner stud construction Mil in position.

The stud Me is preferably formed from channel members I50 which are welded together as illustrated in Figure 23 to form an L-shaped stud construction. The stud members I50 may have formed therein and suitably spaced, vertical slots 52, as illustrated in Figure 7. or lightening slots i038 which, however, are for the. me adapted for cooper order that the clips may be wedged .1: pear 1 ,1 to firmly affix the panels 36 position in wall construction, Over the corner member M3 there is applied the outer corner construction member 542 which has been previously desc ed with respect to Figure 18. As seen from. Figure 23, it is obvious that the corner member 552 and the paneling members 35 may be firmly to the corner stud construction I49 by the use of the clips I and the batten strips 55.

In applying the wall construction to an inner corner of the wall, it is obvious that channel members III may be afiixed to the furring strips I48 and leveled, and the panels 36 and the inner corner member I4I which has been previously described with respect to Figure 18 may be afiixed in position. The panels 36 and MI ar securedin position by means of the clips I00 inserted in the slot construction 52 or modified slot construction I37 and wedged into place, firmly afiixing the corner member I4 and contiguous panel 36. It is obvious that the batten strips 55 are applied in the same manner as they have been previously applied with respect to previous partition systems. It is, therefore, obvious that there has been described a simple method of facing either an interior Wall construction or an exterior wall construction particularly where the walls intersect to form either inner or outer corner constructions.

Figure 24 illustrates the method of affixing the panels in position where the interior or exterior wall facing is co-planar. The wall I4! is faced out with the furring strips I48 either applied vertically or horizontally as illustrated, and the channel members I5I) are erected thereon and secured in position. The wall slabs 36 are then erected in the usual manner by the use of the clips I00 being wedged through the slots 52 or modified slot construction I31 to firmly aifix the panels 36 in position, and the ornamental batten strips 55 are then applied to complete the erection of the wall facing.

Figures 25, 26, and 27 illustrate a modified stud construction wherein a stud construction of great rigidity is desired and particularly where a stud construction is desired that is light in weight and cheap to construct. The modified stud construction I5I preferably comprises the channel members I52 which are spaced apart transversely by heavy gauge members I53 preferably formed from wire and bent in the form as illustrated in Figure 25 and spot-welded at the apexes is illustrated at I I54. It is obvious that a stud so constructed is light in weight yet is very rigid for the amount of metal utilized in its construction. Slots 52 are formed in the face of the channel members I52 and are uniformly spaced along the length of the stud and adapted to receive the clips 5| as illustrated in Figures 25 and 26.

Figures 25 and 26 illustrate a horizontal and vertical sectional view through a partition constructed utilizing this novel stud construction. It is obvious that the panels 36 are aifixed in the same manner to the studs I5I as they are affixed to other stud constructions such as 40 and I5 originally described with respect to Figures 1, 4, 5, and other modified stud constructions. The panels are erected in position and afiixed in position by the clips 5I which are wedged in position in the same manner as previously described with respect to Figures 2 and 3, and the batten strips 55 are then applied completing the erection of the partition system. Although the stud construction has been illustrated using the clips 5I, it is obvious that any one of the clips modified from the clip 5i may be utilized in conjunction with this stud construction, and also that this stud construction may be modified into other forms of stud constructions which are adapted for corner constructions and intersections for the partition assembly.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that the invention provides a number of related but nonequivalent methods and means of attaching relatively thick slabs of wall materials to stud members in the walls of a partition construction or a suitable method of erecting a Wall facing on the interior or exterior of a building construction, and particularly is adapted for the formation of corner constructions with respect to the intersection of partitions and Wall constructions. Each of these methods and means is particularly well adapted to use with wall slabs composed primarily of the so-called rigid type of heat insulating material and particularly has been described with respect to a form of composite meterial comprising a fibrous insulating base material to which has been applied a surface coating or weather proofing surface of asbestos fibre and cement. The wall slabs may comprise asbestos fibre and cement panel members, or gypsum block, and may also include slabs of insulation composed of fibrous materials as well as other types of insulating slabs or blocks or ornamental paneling members, such as for example cast or molded materials containing ingredients of good insulating quality or a high percentage of relatively small voids or pockets of entrapped air or inert gas wherein the panels or slabs are so formed that they have relatively high strength. It is not required with this novel construction that there'shall be incorporated in the slabs securing means in the form of kerfs or other devices which would tend to reduce the strength of the panel nor that there shall be provided securing means which have to be inserted in the panels thus increasing the cost for erecting the panels onto the studs. In this novel partition and wall construction, it is only necessary to have a stud construction formed in accordance with the disclosure of this invention to which is adapted to be affixed a novel form of clip construction which firmly afiixes the wall panels or slabs in position. The features of the invention are particularly desirable in connection with the use of slabs or blocks of insulating material since the method and means of attachment provided do not materially decrease the overall efiiciency of the insulating material used and eliminate penetrating members of high heat conductivity although it is obvious where the clips are affixed to the studs that there will be a tendency for a small heat loss.

However, the invention is not limited to the use of materials of good heat insulating quality for the wall slabs, since the methods and means provided for attaching the slabs to spaced stud members in the partition or wall construction will also prove advantageous for attaching other types of wall materials where a high degree of insulating efiiciency is not essential. Molded or precast slabs of hydraulic cement, natural or synthetic resins, ceramic materials and the like may be attached to the studs of the partition construction or of any type of construction in the manner and by the means herein provided.

As applied to buildings, such as: houses, ofiice buildings, factories and the like, any desired form and type or interior and exterior wall materials may be utilized in conjunction with the wall slabs. Although the partition system has been particularly described with reference to interior partition systems and particularly with respect to a form of material having an insulating base over which is applied a surface finish of asbestos fibre and cement, it is preferred that the partitions shall be left either in their natural color or may be suitably decorated by any of the finishing materials well known in the art. Nevertheless, if it is necessary, these wall slabs may have plaster applied thereto as an interior finish particularly when the base is solely a fibrous insulating material, and when necessary it may be directly applied to the wall slabs although it is not particularly recommended with the surface of asbestos and cement nor is it needed. It is to be understood that expanded metal lath, wire mesh or the like, or the usual wall board form of material known as gypsum wall board or lath may be utilized as a base when desired. Stucco and kellastone or the like may be applied to the exterior surface of the slabs either without, or preferably with, a suitable reenforcing mesh; and, also in this form of application of stucco and kellastone, it is preferred that the base material will be fibrous insulating material to which the stucco and other materials are applied, instead of applying it to the asbestos and cement surfacing material. Brick or stone veneer may be applied although the panels suitably caulked as originally erected may be utilized for an exterior surface when the panels or slabs of an insulating fibre base over which an asbestos cement fibre surface has been applied have been suitably sized and painted with a weather resisting surfacing coat. When wood siding, shingles, or panels of wood, metal or composite materials are employed, suitable nailing strips may be anchored to the slabs in any desired manner, such as for example by embedding or anchoring bolts, metal clips, or the like, in the panels of insulating material and attaching the same to the nailing strips. Masonry veneer may also be anchored to the slabs in a similar manner.

It will also be understood that while metal studs have been particularly disclosed for the erection of the composite panels comprising a fibrous insulating base and an asbestos and cement surfacing, particularly because of the fireproof character of the asbestos fibre and cement surfacing, nevertheless, wood framing may be employed with equal facility, in which case, as has been previously described with respect to the wood stud construction, it may be either square or rectangular or any other suitable shape adapted for erecting the clips thereto, such as has been disclosed in detail with reference to the metal studs for attaching the slabs.

It will of course be understood that various combinations of the features of the invention, other than the combinations illustrated and described will be obvious to those skilled in the art and are therefore entirely within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. The same applies to various modifications and minor departures from the specific forms of wall slabs as well as the method and means of attaching the wall slabs, herein illustrated and described.

What is claimed is:

l. A wall that may be erected and dismantled comprising in combination, spaced stud members, floor channels having upstanding legs, ceiling channels, the spaced stud members supported between the floor and ceiling channels, panels of wall material disposed in pairs on opposite faces of the stud members, demountable clip means removably affixing the panels to the faces of the stud members, said clip means comprising a wedge member, complementally formed means on the stud members whereby the panels are aflixed to the faces of the stud members by the wedging action of the clip means, and a baseboard construction comprising baseboard panels, baseboard clips .removably supporting the baseboard panels and mounting the aforesaid panels of wall material thereon. said baseboard clips engaging the upstanding legs of the floor channels, prongs formed on the baseboard clips, and complemental means formed on the baseboard panels, whereby the wall may be erected and dismantled.

2. A wall construction comprising in combination, spaced stud members, a flooring channel,

construction, and a ceiling channel construction, said stud members mounted therebetween, panels of wall material removably afllxed to the stud members, clips removably affixed to the flooring channel construction and supporting the panels of wall material on opposite faces of the wall construction, and baseboard panels removably affixed to the baseboard clips.

ANDERS C. OLSEN.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/242, 52/285.3, 52/463, 181/284, 52/466, 52/544, 24/335, 52/275, 52/346, 52/409
International ClassificationE04B2/74
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2002/7466, E04B2/7411
European ClassificationE04B2/74C2F