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Publication numberUS2317860 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1943
Filing dateJun 25, 1940
Priority dateJun 25, 1940
Publication numberUS 2317860 A, US 2317860A, US-A-2317860, US2317860 A, US2317860A
InventorsEmil Sorensen
Original AssigneeEmil Sorensen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display tablet container
US 2317860 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27, 1943. E. SRENSEN DISPLAY TABLET CONTAINER Filed June 25, 1940 INVENTOR Platented Apr. 27, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT' oFFlcE DISPLAY TABLET CONTAINER.

Emil Srensen, New York, N. Y. Application June 25, 1940, Serial No. 342,227 6 Claims. (Cl. 20G-42) 'Ihis invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in containers to store or hold and display medicinal tablets, pills, capsules, other wares and the like in a plurality of sealed compartments, pockets, or cells.

One of the primary purposes of the invention is to provide a container of this type which will be light in weight and inexpensive, and formed, if desired, of transparent material for displaying and capable of maintaining its contents at all times prior to use in sealed, individual compartments or pockets and in a sanitary condition.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a non-reflllable container molded of brittle plastic material having a film-like integral breakout; cover individual to each pocket, and which may be originally filled by the manufacturer by machine methods and thereupon be hermetically closed or sealed to maintain its contents in sterilized condition.

It is also the object of the invention to provide display containers molded of plastic material. having the characteristics aforesaid from which a tablet or tablets can be easily removed at will by applying finger pressure to a lm cover to break it out and eject a medicated tablet or other contents without unsealing of any other compartment or disturbance of its contents.

It is also the object of the invention to form the container of such size and of such al shape that it will be very compact and can be carried in a vest pocket or other small receptacle, if desired.

My invention includes the various above and other novel features of construction and arrangement hereinafter more specifically described in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of the display package, approximately in fullsize for five-grain aspirin tablets, constructed in accordance with this invention and illustrating one arrangement of the tablet-holding pockets heretofore mentioned.

, Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 2--2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary, cross-section of the container illustrating the removal of a tablet therefrom by nger pressure.

Fig. 4 is a top view of one modication of the invention.

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 5-5, Fig. 4. y

Fig.y 6 is a view in perspective of the form of the invention shownin Figs. 1, 2 and 3.

container of the type shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 6, illustrating the lodgment of two tablets, in-

^ stead of one, in each of the pockets.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary cross-section of the 55 Referring to the form of my invention shown more particularly in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 8, the container designated in general by the reference character I0 is illustrated as a parallelepiped, preferably with rounded corners II and edges II' as shown, and preferably so thin and flat as not to exceed materially the thickness of the tablets or other objects lodged in the plurality of pockets or cells or pill cavities I2 of the container. These pockets preferably are so shaped and dimensioned as to closely ilt the enclosed tablets or other objects.V As illustrated, the various pockets may be twelve in number, arranged systematically or in any appropriate design.

The container maybe prepared in two initially separate, complementary body sections as illustrated, in their nal juxtaposition, at I3 and Il. These may be of equal or unequal thickness. One or both of these sections may be provided with dowels I5, which may be molded of the same material as the body of the container and coincidentally with the molding of one section or both sections; these dowels may also be of some extraneous material such as metal pins. These dowels formed in one body section and fitted into receiving sockets in the other section serve the purpose of accurately aligning the two sections when they are joined together after lling with the objects, such as tablets, to be dispensed.

I prefer to form my container, or at least its upper and lower faces, from a transparent or translucent plastic material such as Lucite, i. e. methyl metacrylate, or Textolite, or the vinylite series of resins or cellulose esters; for some purposes glass or any other similar plastic material may be used. Any material of the type which can be readily shaped or molded andl which, at the same time, is frangible in thin lms of brittle character and easily ruptured by pressure may be used.

The body of the container is to be so formed that, after lling the pockets with tablets or the like, each cylindrical or other shaped pocket I2 will be closed at one or both ends by a thin and frangible film-like lid which is integral with the body portion and preferably flush with the exterior faces of the container by being integrally formed in an inset manner within each end of the pockets, as illustrated at I 6 and I1. These integrally molded lids I6 and I1, which constitute top and/or bottom closures for the pockets of the completed container, are so thin, or their peripheries may be so scored, that moderate pressure by the finger upon the lid Il or I'I of any pocket will rupture or break out either one or both of the lids around their junctures with the main body of the container.

'I'he sharp edge or perimeter of each pocket I2, at the juncture of the nlm lid I8 and I1 with the body sections, acts in effect as a die cutter, when the nlm is under nger pressure, by producing a smooth and even break-out of said film from the container body. The interior wall of each pocket makes a sharp-like fracturing angle with the interior surface of each film lid. 'I'his new feature, among others, makes a cut-out circumference or perimeter as a feature of my invention which initiates the film-lid breaking action under exure when thumb or finger pressure is applied against the outer surface of the nlm lid or is applied against its inner surface when pushing on the tablet by finger pressure exerted o n the other lid means at the opposite end of the pocket.

The pressure of the finger upon any top or bottom lid I8 or I1 may be transmitted through the tablets I8 to the opposite lid, thus causing the two lids and the tablet to be ejected from the compartment, as is illustrated in Fig. 3. Of course. adherence to the main body of the container by a portion of either or both lids will be within the scope of my invention, provided the tablet or other object can be conveniently removed by the partial rupture and subsequent uplift of'either or both of said lids. It will be understood that my invention also' comprehends rupture or opening of only one lid followed by removal of a tablet by any means.

'I'he material used for molding or otherwise shaping the pocket lids ofmy container should, therefore, have the physical characteristics of frangibility or brittleness which lend themselves to the complete break-out or rupture of the said integral lids as above described. My invention is therefore not limited tothe plastics heretofore specified, but rather comprehends the use of any material, preferably transparent or translucent, which intrinsically possesses or can be made to have the characteristics specified.

It will also be understood that instead of lodging only one tablet in each individual pocket, two or even more tablets may be sealed within each said pocket as illustrated. for example, in Fig. 'I of the drawing.

In use by the manufacturer or dispenser of tablets or similar articles, they may be deposited, preferably by machine, in one of the sectional halves I3 or I 4 of the container. The complementary other half is then placed over the filled section and the two sections are hermetically sealed together, either by application to one or both of the contiguous surfaces of an appropriate solvent adhesive, or by heat according to the methods well known to Workers in the plasticA or related arts, by which the upper and lower parts, as at I3 and Il, are bonded together to form one integral and solidly bonded or molded member. The tablets thus become enclosed, each in its sealed, sanitary compartment, and are not again exposed to air or to possibility of contamination or injury until the instant of removal of the tablet.

One modification of containers of the type comprehended by my invention is illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5 of the drawing. In this form, which may be similar in outline and dimensions to that previously described, the body of the container Ili is formed of only one section. instead of the two heretofore described, and an integral or other lid Il is provided only at one end of each compartment. After the tablets have been lodged in their respective compartments, the second lid may be provided by a covering I9 of paper or any other suitable thin material which, when desired, can be ruptured as heretofore explained, the said material being caused to adhere to the body of the container by any suitable means such as an adhesive. Over this said material I may place a second layer 20 of tin-foil or other suitable metal foil similarly affixed by adhesive or other means; these means may include a cover 2| of metal or other material which, as illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5, may be stamped out or otherwise formed with apertures 23 of about the size of the tablets or compartments. 'Ihe metal may be bent around the four sides of the body of the container, as shown at 2l, so as to form a rim or flange engaging the sides of the container closed by the paper, foil, or the like, leaving only the apertures 23 for the application of pressure to flex the lid or lids to break one or both out when a tablet is to, be removed.

It will also be understood that a further modification of my invention will be provided by use of a single molded body section, formed with a plurality oi' pockets as heretoforel described but with both ends of these pockets entirely open initially. The closures and lids for all of these pockets can then be provided by amxing any suitable thin or film-like sheet of tough brittle plastic material, of appropriate characteristics and shape, to cover the top and bottom of the single body section. This sealing of the pockets is, of course, to be effected after the tablets have been deposited therein. It will also be understood that any suitable legend, directions, or advertising matter may be imprinted upon one or both of the heretofore described two complementary body sections, or to the separate paper or other thin illm used as a closure for either or both ends of the pockets.

I have found that a Lucite container of the size illustrated in the drawing, adapted to hold one dozen five-grain aspirin tablets, weighs four and one-half pennyweight, as compared with the six and one-half pennyweight weight of a metal box now used for the same purpose; so that my Acontainer may weigh about two-thirds the weight f of those now generally used for that purpose.

Moreover, my container can be less bulky, and so made as to be non-reilllable Without detection; and it provides a means for hermetically sealing each tablet in its own individual pocket.

Obviously, the possessor of the package, even if its lids are not made of transparent or translucent material, will be able to determine at any time how many tablets remain unused in the pockets of the container, without removal or lslillgt of a unitary lid or cover, as is now neces- Since my container is relatively thin and flat and is also restricted in its other dimensions, it may be conveniently carriedvin a vest pocket or other receptacle by the user; and there will be no liability of causing crumbling or disintegration of the tablets since the plastic or other material of which it is composed will have the necessary rigidity to protect 'the tablets. Moreover, since the tablets are or may be sealed Ain individual compartments, they are at no time subjected to contamination or other conditions which might impair the medicinal properties of the tablets. It will, of course, be understood that the containers may be made in different sizes and'shapes and other modications than those illustrated and described and that they may be provided with any desired number of pockets without departing from the spirit of the l invention.

This invention is presented to ll a need for a useful display tablet container. It is understoodthat various modifications in construction, operation, use and method, may and often do occur to those skilled in the art, especially after benefiting from the teachings of an invention, and that this disclosure-is exemplary of the principles but not limited to the present embodiment of the invention.

I claim:

1. A container for storing tablets or other wares preserved against exposure to the atmosphere or like conditions until ready for use, comprising a body molded of brittle plastic material, a pocket formed therein to receive atablet,I and lid means molded of the same brittle material integrally with the body over one end of the pocket, the brittle .lid means having a thin and fracturable film-like thickness at its perimeter, thereby adapting the lid means to be exed and pushed from the pocket by nge'r pressure, and lid means also over the other end of the pocket and likewise capable of being flexed by finger pressure, the tablet being accessible only through the lid means.

2. A container for medicinal tablets or other wares which are best preserved when stored in a hermetically sealed condition until ready for use, comprising a body molded of brittle plastic material, a pocket formed therein to receive a tablet, a film-like lid integrally formed over one end of the tablet-receiving pocket, and a filmlike lid molded integrally with the body over the other end of the pocket, the interior wall of the pocket making a sharp-like angle at its juncture with the perimeter of the lm-like lids which are formed sufficiently thin of :brittle plastic material as to break from the body under finger pressure to open the pocket.

3. A container for hermetically sealing medicinal tablets or other Wares until ready for use, comprising a body having a plurality of pockets formed therein to receive the wares aforesaid, and a brittle film-like lid molded integrally with the body over one end of each of the pockets, the interior wall of each pocket making a thinlyformed and sharp-like fracturable juncture with the perimeter of the brittle film-like lid adapting it to break from the body by finger pressure to open the sealed pocket as the only manner of gaining access to the tablet therein, and a filmlike lid also formed integrally over the other end of each of the pockets.

4. A container for-tablets and the like comprising complementary body sections molded of brittle plastic material having fiat faces disposed adjacent each other, each body section being provided with pockets for the reception of tablets initially placed in one of said body sections, the pockets of a body section being formed open at its flat face for registry with the pockets in an adjacent complementary body section in order to complete the pockets ln depth comparable to tablet thickness, the flat faces of the adjacent body sections being joined and sealed to form in effect a unitarily molded container enclosing the tablets in permanently sealed condition against dust and moisture and to prevent the body sections from beingseparated; the outer surface- ,of each body section being molded with filmlike integral -lids over the pockets suiiiciently thin as to be broken out by nger'pressure, the molded lids being inset within the pockets at each end thereof flush with the outer surfaces of the body sections thus forming outer smooth top and bottom sealing closures over the tablets, and the inner surfaces of the molded lids being substantially in contact with the tablets; whereby a tablet may be ejected from the container by pressure of ones finger against the film-like lid to rupture same at its perimeter, the tablet acting to transmit the nger pressure to the opposite lid to also rupture it, thereby permitting the tablet to be pushed out.

5. A container for tablets and the like comprising complementary body sections molded of brittle plastic material having faces disposed adjacent each other, each body section being provided with pockets for the reception of tablets initially placed in one of said body sections, dowel and socket' means provided in the adjacent faces to align the body sections, the pockets of one body section being formed open at its face for registry with the pockets similarly formed in the adjacent body section to make the depth of said pockets comparable to tablet thickness, the faces of the adjacent body sections being united and sealed to permanently join them in the form of a single molded container sealing the tablets therein, and the outer surface of each body section being molded with lm-like integral lids over the pockets, the molded lids being inset Within the pockets at each end thereof to form outer flush and smooth top and bottom sealing closures; whereby a tablet may be ejected from the container by pressure of ones finger against the film-like lid to rupture sam'e at its perimeter, the tablet acting to vtransmit the finger pressure to the opposite lid to also rupture it, thereby permitting the tablet to be pushed out.

6. A container for wares stored and preserved against exposure to the atmosphere and other like conditions until ready for use, comprising a body molded of brittleplastic material, a pocket formed therein to receive the wares, and a filmlike lid molded integrally with the body over one end of the tablet-receiving pocket, the in# terior wall of the pocket making a sharp-like angle at its juncture with the perimeter of the film-like lid and being molded suiliciently thin of the brittle plastic material as to adapt it to be exed and broken from the body by nger pressure, lid means also disposed over the other end of the pocket and comprising a covering of material capable of being flexed under finger pressure, a formed cover device disposed against the covering of material and having a anged rim engaging the body, and an aperture provided in the formed cover device registering with the pocket.

Erm. sRENsEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/531, D24/226, 206/539
International ClassificationB65D83/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/0445
European ClassificationB65D83/04C