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Publication numberUS2317975 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1943
Filing dateMar 10, 1939
Priority dateMar 10, 1939
Publication numberUS 2317975 A, US 2317975A, US-A-2317975, US2317975 A, US2317975A
InventorsBoath Howard E, Harry Cole, Macnish Charles F
Original AssigneeBoath Howard E, Harry Cole, Macnish Charles F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydraulic gate construction
US 2317975 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 4, .1943. H. E. BoATH Erm.

HYDRAULIC GATE CONSTRUCTION Filed March 10, 1939 Q May 4, 1943 H. E. BoATH ETAL HYDRAULIC GATE QONSTRUCTION `2 Shets-Sheet 2 Patented May 4, 1943 HYDRAULIC GATE CONSTRUCTION Howard E. Boath and Charles F. MacNish, St. Louis, Mo., and Harry Cole, Memphis, Tenn.

Application March 10, 1939, Serial N0. 261,026

(Granted under the act of March 3, 1883, as amendedApril 30, 1928; 370 0. vG. 757) Z Claims.

This invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Goverment for governmental purposes, without the payment to us of any royalty thereon.

'I'his invention relates to a. sluice construction having a sluice gate of the closed shell type pivoted to move through an arc between the retaining walls of the sluiceway; more especially this invention is directed to the structural features and hydro-dynamic characteristics of the sluice gate and likewise the automatically effective facilities for increasing and decreasing the buoyancy of the sluice gate as it is raised and lowered in the sluiceway.

Another Object of this invention is to provide a sluice construction wherein the sluice gate may be lowered and raised in the sluiceway to permit the Water to flow either above or below the gate, and which may be adjusted to afford a controlled headwater level under abnormally low headwater conditions, without disrupting the seal between the sluice gate and the apron of the sluiceway.

Another object of this invention is to provide a sluice gate of the type specified having water and air inlet and discharge means which are func- -tionally interrelated with coacting sealing means in connection with the sluice gate and the sluiceway apron for the purpose of increasing and decreasing the buoyancy of the gate as it is moved to open and closed positions between the retaining Walls of the sluiceway.

Another objectof this invention is to provide a tubular sluice gate, substantially elliptical in cross section having its opposite ends closed by elliptical shaped end shields pointed at their extremities and projecting above the body of the gate to form training walls for retaining the overowing sheet of water upon the elliptical body of the gate after the gate has been lowered to closed position to protect the .ends of the gate against ice, drift and other accumulations after said gate has been submerged.

With these and other objects in view, this invention consists in certain novel details of construction, combination and arrangement of parts to be more particularly hereinafter described and claimed. I

The details of this invention may be understood best by reference to the accompanying drawings in which like parts in the two types of construction shown are designated by similar reference characters, the primed numerals referring to the type of sluiced gate employing riveted connections, as illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5, and in which drawings Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the welded type of the elliptical gate structure embodying the' invention; f

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section atthe top of V'the end shield and end projection of the welded gate, taken substantially on line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section of the end projection, approximately midway on the chain track of the welded gate, taken substantially on line 3-3 of Fig. l;

Y Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the rivetedftype of the elliptical gate embodying this invention and represents a type of framingfsimilar to Fig. 1 in order to illustratethe principle of design rather than the method of framing; and

Fig. 5 is a horizontal section at the top of the end shield and projection of the riveted gate, taken substantially on line 5 5 of Fig. 4. i

In the illustrated embodiment characterizing this invention, there is shown in Figs. 1 and 4 a sluiceway embodying laterally spaced retaining walls A, apron B and its downwardly curved oirset portion C. Pivotally connected tothe side walls A of the sluiceway and movable in an arc therebetween is an elliptical sluice gate D adapted to be supported by means of trunnion bearings and hoisting chains, cables or ropes at its opposite ends to be raised and lowered by means of these members as Will hereinafter appear. l

The various parts lof the elliptical gate and its appurtenances, hereinafter calledv the gate, are grouped into four principal portions or classifications for the purposes of clarifying the functions oi each part, and for setting forth its essential relations to other parts. The shape and style of each part of the gate has a useful purpose for the Work that it has toperform. The'four main portions of the gate with their component parts have been designated as the elliptical shell, the transverse frames, the trunnion arms, and the end projections.

The elliptical shell, as best shown in Figs. 1 and 4, is that portion of the gate which forms the dam between the end shields designated by the numeral l, in Fig. 1, and I in Fig. 4. VIt consists of skin plates 2 and 2', :formed in the shape of. anv

elliptical tube or shell which as shown in Fig. l is made up of a plurality of longitudinal plates 2, welded together or otherwise suitably united along its adjacent edges. In Fig. 4 the edges of the adjacent plates 2 are fastened together by rivet plates 33 and rivets. In each type of shell illustrated the plates envelope and are connected to the elliptically shaped framework of longitudinal stringers 3, 3. The skin rplate 2, 2' is` gate into the spillway, so as to materially increase the buoyancy of the gate when it is to be raised to open position. On the other hand as the gate is lowered to closed position the air within it will be replaced by the water entering the shell through the drainage holes, thusincreasing the weight of the shell and facilitating the lowering operation, as will be understood without further discussion. A seal 5, may be attached ator near the bottom of the gate to provide ra watertight connection with a fixed sill beam 6, S' inthe sluiceway apron B when the gate is in a normal closed position. Interior walkways 1 and 1' may be: provided for use in the inspection', maintenance and repair of the structures interior. Integral with the apron B is an arcuate offset portionC adapted to'coact with the seal 5, 5' on the gate while itr islo-wered sufficiently to maintain a predetermined headwater level under'abnormallylow headwater conditions.

The transverse frames are the cross frames which serve to brace and support the elliptical shell against collapse under loads. They' consist of elliptical supporting frames 8 and 8 which may be stiffened, if necessary, by proper struts or cross bracing 9, 9'and which may serve to support the walkways Tand 1', as shown in Figs.

1y and 4.

The trunnion arms, as best shown in Figs. l and 4, are those'members'at each end'of the gate whichfurnish the'supports for the'elliptical shell. They consist each of an end shield I, I', containing the holes I2, I2', aording access to theein- -terio'r of the shell. Each shield is'properly supportedby the members or struts III, I0 and II, II', and is providedwith the additional opening I3, Ii3', for the escape or entry of air -when the gate is submerged or raised from the submerged position. End shields I are extended abovethe sluic'e gate sufficiently to provide' training the walls for retaining the overflow sheet of water upon the shell portionof the gate for the purpose of protecting'the ends ofthe gate'against ice, drift and otherA accumulations which otherwise would seriously interfere with the movement of the gate toopen position. The struts IIJ, I0' and II, Il', are connected to the trunnion assemblies I4, I4', which transmit the reactions from the gate into the trunnion shafts I5, I5', which in turn are supported by bearingl members, not shown, located in'thexedportions of the dam I6, I6'. The entire assembly is stifiened where `necessary by suitable members I1, I1'. The preceding construction affords a metallic shell' construction composed of relatively thin plates of metal by means of which the concentrated loads absorbed by the shell will be transmitted through. the transverse frames andA stringers to the gate supports, thus affording in a tubular4 member the resistance to bending, shearing and compression stresses which would be provided by a solid beam.

The endk projections at each end of the gate form the dam between the end shields I and the fixed portion of the dam I5. The end projections include the chain tracks IB, I8 and I9, I9', hoisting member connections and 20', sidezseals 2 I, 2I guide rollers 22,225, and bracing members 23,

23', as required. The part of the chain track I8, I8', which forms an extension of the upstream surface of the elliptical tube, may be supported by means of the chain track beam 24, 24', which in turn is supported by the struts I, Ill' and II, II', and brackets 25, 25', as best shown in Fig. 4. Projection of the longitudinal ribs 3, 3' through the end shield I and I', will serve to support the chain track beam 24, 24', and likewise may serve to support that portion of the chain track I8, I8', which forms an extension of the upstream surface of the elliptical tube, as best shown in Figs. 1` and 3. The chain tra/ck I 9, I9', which projects above the shell, bears upon and is connected to the endv shield I, I', and the chain track beam 26, 2S', which chain track beam is supported by the' upper strut I0, I0', and a chain track strut 21, 421', `as best shown in Figs. 1, 2, 4 and 5.

In the operation of the gate the shell which is pivotally mounted on the trunnion arms 30, 30', is given an arcuate up or vdown movementby the chains SI, or 3I'. The gates are provided with side seals 2'I, 2|', which contact the'sealing plates 32, 32', in the side walls of the dam, and also the longitudinal seal`5, 5', which contacts the' fixed seal beam 6, 5', the latter'sealing the'lower edge of the shell in the dam structure when the gate is in normally closed position. The gate is also provided with guide rollers 22, 22', which contact the surfaces of the sealing plates 32, 32' to-provide for easier movement of the gate.

While the accompanying drawings and foregoing descriptions illustrate preferred' forms of construction for carrying this invention intoeffect, these structures are capable of variations and modification without departing from the spirit of the invention. We therefore do not wish to be limited to the precise details of construction as set forth but desire to avail ourselves'of such variations and modifications as come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having described our invention, what we claim as new and wish'to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. In a'sluice construction of the character described, the combination with parallel retaining walls spaced to dene a sluiceway, the opposing surfaces of said walls being provided with sealing plates, an apron between said -walls and forming a flooring for the sluiceway, and a sill seated in and arranged transversely of said apron; of a sluice gate of the closed shell type mounted for swinging movement between said retaining walls, means in connection with said gate for imparting thereto the resistance to bending andcompression stresses aiforded by a solid beam, said means including a metallic open ended shell elliptical in cross-section, a series of transverse elliptical frames arranged interior of the shell at predetermined intervals lengthwise thereof, a series of longitudinally extend-ing stringers affixed tothe inner surface of the shell and the peripheries of said frames, end shields attached to the extremities of said stringers and closing the open ends of said shell whereby the concentrated load adsorbed by the shell will be transmitted to said end shields, said end shields projecting suciently above the shell to form opposing training walls whereby the flow of water above the gate will be confined to its shell portion, sealing means attached to the lower portion of said sluice gate and arranged to coact with said sill whereby the gate may be lowered below the normal sealing position of the sill to meet low headwater conditions without disrupting .the seal between the sluice gate and said apron, and end projections positioned at the extremites of said gate immediately adjacent said end shields, each of said projections including a chain track forming an extension of the upstream surface of the shell portion of said gate, and a sealing member for sliding contact with the sealing plates on the opposing surface of said training walls.

2. In a sluice construction of the character described, the combination with parallel retaining walls spaced to dene a sluiceway, the opposing Surfaces of said walls being provided with sealing plates, an apron between said walls and forming a flooring for the sluiceway, and a sill seated in and arranged transversely of said apron; of a sluice gate of the closed shell type mounted for swinging movement between said retaining walls, means in connection with said gate for imparting thereto the resistance to bending and compression stresses aorded by a solid beam, said means including an open ended metallic shell composed of a series of relatively thin skin plates arranged in the form of an ellipse, a series of transverse elliptical frames located interior of the shell portion at predetermined intervals lengthwise thereof, a plurality of longitudinally extending stringers aixed to the inner surface of the shell and the peripheries of said frame, end shields attached to the free ends of said stringers and closing the open ends of said shell portion whereby the concentrated load absorbed by the skin pla tes of said shell -will be transmitted to said end shields,

said end shields having their upper portions projecting sufficiently above the shell portion of said gate to form opposing training walls whereby the flow of water above the gate will be confined to said shell portion, sealing means attached to the lower portion of said sluice gate and arranged to coact with said sill whereby the gate maybe lowered below the normal sealing position of the sill to meet low headwater conditions without disrupting the seal between tne sluice gate and said apron, end projections mounted at the extremities of said gate immediately adjacent said end shields, each of said projections including a chain track forming an extension of the upstream surface of the shell portion of said gate, a sealing member for sliding Contact with the sealing plates on the opposite sides of said retaining walls, and a plurality of rollers to the rear of the sealing member adapted to engage said sealing plates, and means in connection with said sluice gate to increase and decrease its buoyancy as said gate is raised and lowered in the sluiceway, said means comprising air and water passages in the upper and lower portions of the shell, said Water passages being adapted to be disposed at the tailwater end of the sluiceway and to the rear of said sealing means when the gate is in its closed position.

HOWARD E. BOATH. CHARLES F. MACNISH. HARRY COLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2705871 *Sep 28, 1953Apr 12, 1955Kenigsberg Alexander HAnchorage for hydraulic gates
US3509724 *Nov 6, 1967May 5, 1970Fluid Dynamics LtdGate valve means for controlling the flow of water over a weir,dam wall or the like
US3693356 *Oct 19, 1970Sep 26, 1972Allis Chalmers Mfg CoHydraulic turbine inlet configuration
US4657434 *Aug 30, 1984Apr 14, 1987Woolnough Anthony LRiver control structures
US7083359 *Aug 21, 2001Aug 1, 2006Rubicon Research Pty. Ltd.Control gates
US7244078Sep 27, 2005Jul 17, 2007Rubicon Research Pty, Ltd.Control gates
US7461999Nov 4, 2005Dec 9, 2008Rubicon Research Pty, Ltd.Flow measurement and control
US7614824Jun 6, 2007Nov 10, 2009Rubicon Research Pty, Ltd.Control gates
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/100
International ClassificationE02B7/20, E02B7/42
Cooperative ClassificationE02B7/42
European ClassificationE02B7/42