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Publication numberUS2318432 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1943
Filing dateSep 13, 1940
Priority dateSep 13, 1940
Publication numberUS 2318432 A, US 2318432A, US-A-2318432, US2318432 A, US2318432A
InventorsJohn S Stanier, Ernest B Plott
Original AssigneeYoungstown Sheet & Tube Compan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for descaling strip material
US 2318432 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 4, 1943 J. 5. STANIER E TAL 2,318,432

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DESCALING STRIP MATERIAL Filed Sept. 13, 1940 1 m n mm m S I n and Ernest B.Plo 1'1 Patented May 4, 1943 METHOD AND APPARATUS Fo DESCAIJNG STRIP MATERIAL John. S. Stanier and Ernest B; Plott, Youngstown, Ohio, assignors to The Youngstown Sheet & Tube Company, Youngstown, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio ApplicationSeptember 13, 1940, Serial No. 356,600

6 Claims.

This invention relates to the treatment of metallic strip and, in particular, to the removal of scale from ferrous strip or the like.

In the manufacture of sheet metal in strip form, e. g. steel strip, the strip is customarily pickled in an acid solution to remove the hotmill scale therefrom before the strip. is 'coldrolled. The pickling operation is objectionable because of the expense involved in constructing and maintaining large pickle tanks, to say nothing of the cost of the acid used. Various attempts have been made heretofore to obviate the acid pickling of ferrous sheet metal but none of them, so fas as we are aware, has been capable of satisfactorily removing the hot-mill scale to permit subsequent cold-rolling.

We have invented a novel method and apparatus for treating hot-rolled strip to remove the scale therefrom at a cost much below that of the conventional pickling process and at a speed higher than is practical in the latter. In a preferred embodiment and practice of our invention, we provide a, scale breaker and a brushing unit adapted to work on the strip progressively as it passes through the apparatus. In the scale breaker, the strip is bent back and forth to fracture the coating of scale and loosen it from the underlying metal after which brushes in the brushing unit engage opposite sides of the strip to positively dislodge. the loosened scale particles.

The preferred embodiment and practice of the invention are illustrated somewhat diagrammatically in the accompanying drawing, the single figure of which is a longitudinal, vertical section through the apparatus, showing a coil of strip in side elevation. Y

Referring now in detail to the drawing, the apparatus which We prefer to employ for carrying out the method of our invention comprises subjected may be varied. It will be apparent that strip from a coil l9 disposed on the supporting rolls I3, when passed around the rolls i5, i6 and H in the manner illustrated in the drawing, is progressively subjected to sharp bends in opposite directions. This progressive bending of the strip stretches the scale layer on opposite sides thereof to such an extent that it is fragmented and the bond between'it and the underlying metal loosened.

A roller leveler 20 is also mounted in the housing l8 and is adapted to' work on the strip after it has passed through the bending rolls i5, I6 and I1. The bending rolls deform the strip beyond the elastic limit and the roller leveler restores the strip to a substantially flat or level condition. The leveler 20 is of conventional construction, comprising a plurality of pairs of staggered rolls 2| by which the strip is bent back and forth to a progressively decreasing extent and is finally delivered substantially flat.

The brushing unit i2 comprises a plurality of staggered guide rolls 22 through 21. The rolls are arranged as illustrated so that the strip passing around them successively in the manner shown is bent in opposite directions. Rotary brushes 28 engage the strip as it passes around the rolls 23 through 26. The bristles of the brushes are at relatively high speed whereby both sides of the strip are subjected to a vigorous abrading an uncoiler III, a scale breaker II and a brushillustrated.

The scale breaker comprises staggered bending rolls l5, l6 and I1 journaled in suitable bearings (not shown) and enclosed in a housing l8 indicated diagrammatically. The bending roll l6 ispreferably mounted for vertical adjustment, as indicated by the dotted line position thereof, whereby the degree of bending to which the strip traveling around the rolls is action while bent convexly. This brushing effectively removes all the scale particles adhering to the strip after it is passed through the bending rolls l5, l6 and H and the roller leveler 20. As previously stated, the bending rolls cause fragmentation of the scale layers by the elongation thereof resulting from bending the strip in opposite directions which also loosensthe bond between the scale and the metal. By reasonof this result, it is possible for the rotary brushes effectively to remove the scale particles entirely, leaving the surfaces of the strip uniformly scalefree and in excellent condition for subsequent cold-rolling.

The bending rolls 22 through 21 and the rotary brushes 2! are preferably enclosedin a housing indicated diagrammatically at 29.

The strip 8 may be drawn from the coil I9 through the scalebreaker II and the brushing unit I! byany convenient means such as a pair of driven pinch rolls 30. Alternatively, the strip may be recoiled on any suitable form of coiler (not shown), It the strip is to be further reduced by cold-rolling, it will be recoiled. If the hot mill. In such case, the strip is preferably pulled through the apparatus by the pinch rolls 30 and delivered thereby directly to a suitable tank containing a light pickling solution.

It will be understood that in any case, successive coils will be attached end to end so they may be pulled successively through the apparatus shown without the necessity of rethreading each coil separately. i

It will be apparent from the foregoing description that the invention is characterized by numerous advantages. In the first place, the cost of the apparatus which we employ is much less than that of the numerous long pickling tanks which have been necessary heretofore for descaling strip. The maintenance cost of the apparatus shown is likewise much less than that of the acid pickling method. -A further important advantage is that our invention is capable of descaling strip at a relatively high speed, i. e., 300 feet per minute which is considerably higher than speeds ordinarily employed in the acid pickling of strip. As explained above, the invention may serve as a substitute for the entire acid pickling equipment or it may be used to treat the strip in advance of a light pickling, thereby making possible the passage of the strip through the pickling solution at a much higher speed than has been practical heretofore.

Although we have illustrated and described but a preferred embodiment and practice of the invention, it will be recognized that other arrangements and procedures may be employed within the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1; Apparatus for descaling strip comprising a roller leveler, staggered scale-breaking rolls on one side of the leveler adapted to bend the strip sharply in opposite directions, additional staggered rolls on the other side of the leveler adapted to bend the stripragain and brushes engaging the strip as it passes over said last-mentioned rolls.

2. In a method of removing tight scale from hot-rolled metal strip, the steps including subjecting the strip progressively while at substantially room temperature to sharp bends in opposite directions, thereby fragmenting the scale layers then subjecting the strip to a roller leveling operation, then again subjecting the strip to sharp bends in opposite directions whilebrushing each side of the strip at the point where it is convex thereby removing scale fragments remaining on the strip.

3. In a method of removing tight scale from hot-rolled metal strip, the steps including leading the strip about staggered rolls while at substantially room temperature thereby bending the strip progressively in opposite directions, roller leveling the strip, and brushing both sides of the strip progressively at the points where it is convexly bent.

4. In a method of removing tight scale from hot-rolled metal strip, the steps including leading the strip about staggered rolls while at substantially room temperature thereby bending the strip progressively in opposite directions, roller leveling the strip, again leading the strip about staggered rolls thereby bending it progressively in opposite directions and brushing the strip on both sides at points wher they are convex.

5. The method of removing scale from a metal sheet which comprises flexing such sheet sharply and simultaneously brushing the convex surface of such sheet normal to the line of flexing.

6. In a method of removing tight scale from hot-rolled metal strip, the steps including subjecting the strip progressively to sharp bends in opposite directions, thereby fragmenting the scale layers then again subjecting the strip' to sharp bends in opposite directions while brushing each side of the strip at the point where it is convex thereby removing scale fragments remaining on the strip.

JOHN S. STANIER. ERNEST B. PLOT'I'.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2666282 *Apr 19, 1951Jan 19, 1954Osborn Mfg CoMethod of conditioning metal sheets, strips, rods, and the like
US2680938 *Nov 9, 1949Jun 15, 1954Osborn Mfg CoApparatus for conditioning metal sheets and the like
US2702937 *Oct 17, 1950Mar 1, 1955Smart Gordon ERod machine and process
US2790229 *May 27, 1952Apr 30, 1957Youngstown Foundry & Machine CApparatus for processing metal strip
US2857655 *Mar 19, 1954Oct 28, 1958United Eng Foundry CoApparatus for processing strip metal
US2874451 *May 4, 1955Feb 24, 1959United States Steel CorpRod descaler
US2913808 *Jan 24, 1956Nov 24, 1959ThomasMethod for the continuous removal of the scaly matter from hot-rolled, band-like iron products
US2937431 *Jun 7, 1955May 24, 1960Osborn Mfg CoMethod and mechanism for processing elongated metal articles
US3040608 *Mar 3, 1955Jun 26, 1962Osborn Mfg CoReciprocating surface-finishing mechanism and method
US3054162 *Feb 17, 1958Sep 18, 1962August Seuthe MaschfMethod and apparatus for descaling strip material, especially strip iron
US3114971 *Mar 24, 1961Dec 24, 1963Warner BrosPreparation of magnetic oxide coatings
US3451237 *Apr 22, 1964Jun 24, 1969Coilfeed Systems IncStrip stock processing machine
US3699726 *Mar 26, 1971Oct 24, 1972Charles A TurnerMethod of descaling
US3731432 *Jan 5, 1972May 8, 1973Carborundum CoApparatus for removing wustite scale centrifugal blasting
US4392302 *Dec 23, 1980Jul 12, 1983Fuji Electric Company, Ltd.Method of manufacturing a movable contact member
US6732561 *Sep 23, 2002May 11, 2004The Material Works, Ltd.Method and apparatus for leveling and conditioning sheet metal
US6814089Jun 3, 2003Nov 9, 2004The Material Works, Ltd.Conditioning liquid cleaning and recycling system for sheet metal conditioning apparatus
US6814815Apr 7, 2003Nov 9, 2004The Material Works, Ltd.Eliminating hematite and magnetite layers and some of wustite layer
US7081167Oct 5, 2004Jul 25, 2006The Material Works, Ltd.Method of removing scale and inhibiting oxidation and galvanizing sheet metal
US7081168Nov 8, 2004Jul 25, 2006The Materials Works, Ltd.Method of removing scale and inhibiting oxidation and pre-painting sheet metal
US7081169Nov 8, 2004Jul 25, 2006The Material Works, Ltd.Method of removing scale and inhibiting oxidation and cold rolling sheet metal
US7156926Aug 11, 2004Jan 2, 2007The Material Works, Ltd.Method of removing scale and inhibiting oxidation in processed sheet metal
DE1094219B *Feb 14, 1957Dec 8, 1960Osborn Mfg CoBuersteinrichtung zum Reinigen, beispielsweise Entzundern, von biegsamem, sich fortbewegendem Gut, insbesondere Draht
WO1998029205A1 *Dec 29, 1997Jul 9, 1998J & L Specialty Steel IncBrushing process for corrosion and oxidation resistance
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/81.3, 72/40, 451/909
International ClassificationB21B45/06
Cooperative ClassificationB21B45/06, Y10S451/909
European ClassificationB21B45/06