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Publication numberUS2318744 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1943
Filing dateNov 30, 1939
Priority dateNov 30, 1939
Publication numberUS 2318744 A, US 2318744A, US-A-2318744, US2318744 A, US2318744A
InventorsGeorge B Brown
Original AssigneeJohns Manville
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of insulating
US 2318744 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 11, 1943. Y A G, B BROWN 2,318,744

METHOD OF INSULA'I'ING` Filed Nov. 3Q, 1939 Y v .1 .En

BY 4f '@.lcg

.4 TTORNEY.

Patented May ll, 1943 METHOD OF IN SULATIN G George B. Brown, Martinsville, N. J., asslgnor to f Johns-Manville Corporation, New York, N. Y.,

a corporation of, New York Application November 30, 1939, Serial No. 306,812

10 Claims.

The present invention relates to the insulating of refrigerator cabinets, and other structures including wall spaces in 'which insulating material is disposed. For the purposes of illustration, the invention will be specically described in connection with refrigerator cabinets, but it will be understood that the invention is applicable to such other similar structures.

' Refrigerator cabinets as conventionally made comprise aninner shell or liner defining a food compartment, preferably' formed of a unitary or one-piece structure, an outer casing or shell and insulating material filling the spaces between the shells. The inner shell is supported in a suitable manner in spaced relationshpsto the outer shell, as'by blocks or framing members.i Suitably, the inner andouter shells are secured together at the door opening by the door frame members Composed of a substantially non-conducting material.

A principal object of the present invention is the provision of an improved insulating method involving the pneumatic conveying or blowing of a comminuted or loose insulating material into the space between the walls of the inner and outer shells of a. cabinet of the type referred to above. e

Another object of the invention is the provision of a pneumatic insulatingl method for cabinets or the like which will insure the filling of the space between the inner and outer cabinet walls to a uniform and desired density.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a method for insulating refrigerator cabinets in which the insulating material is blown into the space between the inner and outer walls, while at the same time the air is exhausted from the space at successive locations where the insulating material is deposited.

Briefly stated, my invention resides in a process in which a comminuted insulating material is preferably pneumatically conveyed or blown into the spaces between an air-pervious temporary or permanent inner liner and an outer cabinet cas-l ing. Simultaneously with the introduction of the insulating material, the air is withdrawn through the pervious liner by a suitable suction device arranged to concentrate its air withdrawal action at the rear of the cabinet, whereby suilicient force is exerted on the insulating material to cause it to carry to and completely iill the space at such location. The means for withdrawing the air is gradually moved outwardly toward the front of the cabinet as the insulating material is introduced to4 cause the insulating material to become 55 deposited at successive locations in the cabinet walls until the spaces are completely illled.

My invention will be more fully understood and further objects and advantages thereof will become apparent when reference is made to'the more detailed description thereof which is to fol? low and to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a sectional view of a refrigerator or like cabinet in the course of assembly illustrating the method of the instant invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar view illustrating a later point in the operation of the method;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Figs. 1 and 2`illustrating the'insulating operation when nearing completion; y

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of a completed refrigerator or similar cabinet; and

Fig. 5 is a view illustrating a modification of the invention. A

Referring now to the drawing, a refrigerator or similar cabinet in the course of manufacture is indicated generally at I0, comprising an outer shell l l which may be suitably ed or otherwise secured together. In accordance with the preferred practice of the invention, a temporary liner or inner casing I2, having substantially the dimensions of the permanentliner later to be employed, is inserted within the outer casing II and spaced therefrom by blocks I4 or other suitable discontinuous framing members conventionally employed in cabinets of this type. The temporary inner liner is formed of a suitable air-pervious foraminous material which may. for example, be a iine mesh screen. The outer casing Il and inner liner I2 define therebetween at the back, sides, top and bottom, spaces I6 t0 be llled with a suitable liner and outer casing terminate at the door opening I8, leaving, at this stage in the operations, a slot I9 communicating with the spaces I6 and suitably extending completely around the door opening I8.

In accordance with the method of the instant invention, the cabinet I 0, preferably while on the assembly line, has the spaces I6 filled with a suitable comminuted or granular insulating material, preferably comprising nodulated mineral wool, which is the form of mineral wool made, for example, by melting and iiberizing rock or slag, collecting the fibres in the form of a loose felt, dis. integrating the felt, and then tumbling the material with the result that small pellets or nodules are formed. The nodules may be waterproofed in any suitable mannenif desired. In lieu of this in one piece or formed of a multiplicity of separate plates w'eldinsulating material. The

material, loose mineral wool or other loose or comminuted insulating materials may be employed.

The insulating material is drawn from any suitable source of supply and forced or blown un- 5 der air pressure or the like into the spaces I5 through one or more hoses 20, having nozzles 22 adapted to be inserted in the slot I9. Suitably, a number of the hoses may be employed to simultaneously introduce the insulating material into the spaces at the top, bottom and side walls of the cabinet, as diagrammatically illustrated in the drawing. However, the introduction of the insulating material may take place at as many locations around the door opening as desired. A temporary gasket 23 of any suitable type, although not essential, may be advantageously employed to seal off the slot I9, except at the points of entry of nozzles 22.

To act in conjunction with the insulation introducing devices, there is provided an air withdrawal mechanism indicated diagrammatically at 24. This mechanism comprises a piston head 26 of a conguration to fit loosely within the cabinet, suitably of rectangular shape for the ordinary cabinet, and a sealing lip or packing 28 extending from the periphery of the piston head and of sufficient width to lie in sealing engagement with the inner surfaces of the liner I2. The sealing member 28 may be formed of rubber L30 or other similar flexible material. Piston 26 is carried by a hollow piston rod 30, the hollow in,L terior 32 of which is in communication with the space between the rear wall of the cabinet and the piston head when the piston is in operative 35 position within the cabinet. The piston 26, carried by piston rod 30, may be inserted within and withdrawn from the interior of the cabinet in any suitable manner. Thus, this may be accomplished. by manual operation or by any desired 4o type of mechanical means. The hollow interior 30 of the piston rod is connected to any suitable source of suction, which may, for example, be the intake side of the air pump employed in connection with the blowing operation. Y

In the operation of the method as thus far described, the temporary liner I2 is placed within the interior of the outer shell II and supported on the blocks I4 or other discontinuous framing members in proper spaced relationship to the outer shell. The hose nozzles are inserted through slot I 9 and the remainder of the slot sealed on by gasket 23, if desired. The piston 26 is moved into the cabinet until its sealing gasket 28 is pressed against the top, bottom and side walls adjacent the rear wall of the cabinet (see Fig. 1). Air is then drawn from the space I6 at the rear of the box through the hollow piston rod 3l] `by the suction source previously referred to. Continuously with the removal of the air, the comminuted or loose insulating material is introduced to the spaces I6 through one or more of the hoses 20 and nozzles 22. The insulating material, through the Velocity imparted to it in the blowing operation and the suction created by the withdrawal of the air through the piston 26 and piston rod 30, is carried to the space I6 at the rear of the cabinet to compactly and uniformly nil said space, irrespective of minor obstructions which may be present. When this initial space has been filled, the piston is gradually moved outwardly (see Figs. 2 and 3), the air now .being withdrawn through the side, top and bottom walls of the foraminous inner liner to deposity the insulating material in the top, bottom and side wall spaces. Similarly as before, the operation provides for a uniform and compact deposition of the insulating material. The operation is continued, with the piston gradually being moved outwardly, until all the spaces I6 are completely lled with the insulating material. Thereafter, the temporary gasket 23 and inner liner I2 are removed and a permanent impervious inner liner 34 (see Fig. 4) inserted.

The -packing of the insulation in position, through the combined action of the blowing operation and the suction, forms a firm, self-sustaining insulating layer with the ability to withstand the Withdrawal of the temporary liner and the insertion of the -permanent line 34. After the insertion of the inner liner, the door framing pieces 3B are secured in position by any conventional means and the insulated cabinet thus completed. The nished cabinet has been illustrated in Fig. 4, with the machinery compartment and supporting base indicated in dotted lines, and other appurtenances omitted, as they form no part of the instant invention. The cabinet door is not shown, but it will be understood that it may be of any suitable type and may, if desired, have insulating material installed between spaced walls thereof in a similar manner to that described above.

As has .been mentioned, the movements of pislton 26 and also the rate of introduction of the insulating material may be under manual control. However, these operations may be auto- :matically controlled in timed relationship so that the piston is drawn through the cabinet at a rate to cause the deposition of the insulating material at the desired density.

According to the modification of the invention illustrated in Fig. 5, no temporary liner is employed and a permanent liner 3B is inserted within the outer casing I0 prior to the installation of the insulation. In this case, the'permanent inner liner is provided with a multiplicity of minute openings or perforations 40, closely and preferably uniformly spaced throughout the walls of the liner. Suitably, the perforations 40 are made extremely minute, such as only to permit the passage of air therethrough, but are provided in such number as to' have an aggregate area in any portion of the liner to adequately provide for the withdrawal of the air from the space between the cabinet walls. With the use of a liner of this type, after the insulation has been installed, the cabinet is completed by assembling the door framing pieces, without the necessity of removing the liner, or the door iraming pieces may be assembled prior to introduction of the insulation, with the exception of small sections to provide openings f or the entry of the hose nozzles. In the latter case, the assembled frame pieces serve the function of the temporary gasket 23 employed in the method illustrated in Figs. 1 to 3.

The construction of Fig. 5 has the additional advantage that the minute openings 40 provide means forpermitting breathing between the interior cold chamber and the insulated space to prevent the condensation of moisture upon'the insulating material.

Having thus described my invention in rather full detail, it will be understood that these details need not be strictly adhered to, but that various changes and modications will suggest themselves to one skilled in the art, all falling within the scope of the invention as defined by the subjoined claims.

What I claim is:

l. A method of insulating structures including walls defining an insulation-receiving space therebetween, said method-comprising -conveying insulating material within said space and withdrawing air from said space at successive locations of deposition of said insulating material by moving air-exhausting means along said space in substantially timed relationship to the deposition of the insulating material.

2. A method of insulating structures including spaced walls, one of which is pervious to air, coinprising providing an opening to the space between the walls for the entry of insulating material thereto, conveying insulating material through said opening into said space, withdrawing air from said space through said pervious wall at a location remote from said opening by the application of exhausting means to said location, whereby the insulating material is caused to completely iill the space at ysaid location, and withdrawing air from said space at successive locations approaching said opening as said space fills with insulating material, by moving said airexhausting means along said pervious wall in substantially timed relationship to the deposition of the insulating material.

3. A method of insulating a space defined on one side by an air-pervious wall comprising pneumatically conveying insulating material into said space, withdrawing air from said space through said pervious wall at a confined location remote from the place of entry of said insulating material by the application of air-exhausting means at said location, whereby the insulating material is caused to completely fill the space at said location, and withdrawing air from said space at successive confined locations as said space lls with the insulating material by moving said air-exhausting means along said airpervious wall in substantially timed relationship to the deposition of the insulating material.

4. A method of insulating a cabinet including a relatively air-impervious outer casing, said method comprising supporting within said casing an air-pervious liner deiining a continuous space with the walls of said outer casing, conveying bulk insulating material into said space, with-V drawin'g air from said space through said pervious linear at a coniined location remote from the place of entry of said insulating material by the application of air-exhausting means at said location, whereby the insulating material is caused to completely fill the space at said location, and withdrawing air from said space at successive confined locations as said space fllls with insulating material by moving said air-exhausting means along said liner in substantially timed relationship to the deposition of the insulating material.

5. A method of insulating a cabinet including a relatively air-impervious outer casing, 'said method comprising supporting within said casing a foraminous temporary liner defining a continuous space with the walls of said outer casing, conveying bulk insulating material into said space, withdrawing air from, said space through said foraminous liner at a coniined location remote from the place oi entry of said insulating material by the application of air-exhausting means to said location, whereby the insulating material is caused to completely iill the space at said location, and withdrawing air from said space at successive locations as said space iills with the insulating material by moving said airexhausting means along said liner in substa tially timed relationship to the deposition of the insulating material.

6. A method of insulating a cabinet including a relatively air-impervious outer casing, said method comprising supporting within said casing a foraminous temporary liner dening with said casing a continuous space having an opening adjacent the front of the cabinet, pneumatically conveying insulating material into said space through said opening, withdrawing air from said space through said foraminous lin'er at a confined location remote from the opening by the application of air-exhausting means to said location, whereby the insulating material 1s cause to completely iill the space at said location, and withdrawing air from said space at successive conned locations as said space lls with the insulating material by moving the air-exhausting means along said liner in substantially timed relationship to the deposition of said insulating material.

7. A method of insulating a cabinet comprising a relatively air-impervious outer casing, said method comprising inserting within said casing a temporary air-pervious liner to define a space with the walls of said outer casing, pneumatically conveying insulating material into said space, withdrawing air from said space through said temporary pervious liner at a coniined location remote from the place of entry of said insulating material by the application of air-exhausting means to said location, whereby the insulating material is caused to completely fill the space at said location, withdrawing air from said space at successive conned locations until said space is filled with insulating material by movf method comprising supporting within said casing a temporary foraminous liner defining with said sulating material by moving said air-exhausting means along said liner in substantially timed relationship to the deposition of said insulating material, removing said temporary liner and said opening sealing means, and securing a permanent inner liner against said insulating material.

9. A method of insulating a cabinet including a relatively air-impervious outer casing and an space through said opening, withdrawing air from said space through said perforated liner at a connned location remote from said opening by the method comprising conveying insulating material application of air-exhausting means at said locainto said space through said opening, withdrawtion, whereby the insulating material is caused ing air from said space through said perforated to completely ll the space at said location, and liner at a coniined location remote from said withdrawing air from said space at successive 5 opening by the application of air-exhausting conned locations as said space iills with insulatmeans at said location, whereby the insulating ing material by moving said air-exhausting material is caused to completely iill the space at means in substantially timed relationship to the said location, withdrawing air from said space at deposition of the insulating material. successive confined locations as said space lls 10. A method of insulating a cabinet including 10 withV the insulating material until the space is a.relatively air-impervious outer casing and an completely filled by moving said air-exhausting inner liner having a multiplicity of closely spaced means along said liner in substantially timed reminute perforations distributed throughout its lationship to the deposition of said insulating maarea, said casing and liner defining a continuous terial, and securing framing pieces in position to space therebetween, and said cabinet including 15 close said opening. an opening to said space at the front thereof, the GEORGE B. BRJOWN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559356 *Apr 28, 1945Jul 3, 1951Johns ManvilleMethod and apparatus for insulating refrigerators and the like
US2595262 *Mar 26, 1949May 6, 1952Monsanto ChemicalsMethod and apparatus for filling containers
US2676773 *Jan 8, 1951Apr 27, 1954North American Aviation IncAircraft insulated fuel tank
US2800243 *Nov 26, 1954Jul 23, 1957Ondrejka Albert AMultiple wall container and method of construction
US2882701 *Dec 7, 1954Apr 21, 1959Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus having cold air jacket
US2961116 *Jan 3, 1956Nov 22, 1960Applied Radiation CorpThermally insulated wall structure
US2971616 *Dec 6, 1956Feb 14, 1961William Bayley CoBuilding panel
US2989790 *Jun 10, 1957Jun 27, 1961Brown Judd AApparatus and method for applying and packing fibrous material
US3158906 *Feb 19, 1962Dec 1, 1964Amerace CorpApparatus for molding plastic articles
US4712347 *Oct 31, 1986Dec 15, 1987Sperber Henry VMethod and apparatus for containing insulation using netting
US5257486 *Apr 23, 1991Nov 2, 1993Adhesives Technology Corporation 1987Nozzle for injecting a sealant into a crack
US5509248 *Sep 26, 1994Apr 23, 1996Aktiebolaget ElectroluxMethod for filling and packing insulating powder in the walls of a cabinet body
EP0645576A1 *Sep 14, 1994Mar 29, 1995Aktiebolaget ElectroluxMethod for filling and packing insulating powder in the walls of a cabinet body
WO1988003205A1 *Oct 30, 1987May 5, 1988Henry SperberMethod and apparatus for containing insulation using netting
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/742.11, 220/DIG.900
International ClassificationF25D23/06
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/064, Y10S220/09
European ClassificationF25D23/06B2