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Publication numberUS2318864 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1943
Filing dateFeb 17, 1940
Priority dateFeb 17, 1940
Publication numberUS 2318864 A, US 2318864A, US-A-2318864, US2318864 A, US2318864A
InventorsJackson Thomas E
Original AssigneeJackson Thomas E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medical wood splint
US 2318864 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y T. E. JACKSON 2318,864

MEDICAL WOOD SPLINT Filed Feb. 17, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR 9 ATTORNEY May 11, 1943. -r 5 JACKSON 2,318,864

MEDICAL WOOD SPLINT Fil'ed Feb. 17, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 'ATTORNEY.

' INVENTOR Patented May 11, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 5 Claims.

This invention relates to splints of the type employed by physicians and surgeons in setting or reducing bone fractures, the principal object being the provision of a splint of this type by means of which a fractured bone may be set or reduced and held in place during knitting of the bone in a simpleand efiicient manner, and that will eliminate the need of a plaster case in most instances together with the weight and discomforture thereof.

Other objects of the invention include the provision of a medical or surgical splint of curved cross-sectional configuration approximating the cross-sectional curvature of that portion of a human arm or limb to which it is adapted to be applied and of sufficient transverse flexibility to permit it to be drawn into conformity to the crosssectional curvature of such arm or limb, but being substantially rigid in a longitudinal direction and resistant to bending in the direction of length thereof; the provision of a medical or surgical splint of the type described formed of relatively thin material and provided with longitudinally overlapping slots 'therein imparting transverse flexibility thereto but having in particular un-' slotted marginal side portions of sufilcient width to impart longitudinal rigidity thereto; the provision of a medical splin't of the typedescribed together with a separately formed handgrip portion applicable to one end thereof and capable of being fixed thereto in a position found to be most natural for the particular patient to which the splint is applied; the provision of a surgical splint having a handgrip portion as above described and in which the connection between the splint and the handgrip portion permits swiveling of the handgrip portion upon the end of the splint in adjusting the handgrip portion to fit the particular patient to which the splint is applied; the provision of a medical Wood splint of the type described and handgrip portion therefor in which the splint is provided with a rounded end portion and the handgrip portion is provided with a slot to which the rounded end of the splint is receivable and in which the splint is capable of of the type described in which the offset end portion is provided with a hand grip pivotally associated therewith and capable of being secured in suitably adjusted relation with respect to the splint; and'the provision of a surgical splint including a main body portion formed of relatively thin material and of curved cross-sectional configuration over the major portion of its length and having an end portion thereof bent transversely to the general plane of thickness thereof into offset relation with respect thereto, the main body portion being provided with longitudinal slots therein imparting transverse flexibility to the main body portion thereof and at least one of which slots extendsinto the longitudinal curvature of the offset end thereof.

Still further objects of the present invention include the provision of a surgical splint having a handgrip portion supported at one end thereof, the handgrip portion comprising a member presenting an exterior surface forming a part of an approximate sphere or ball; the provision of a medical wood split of the type described in which the effective diameter of the ballor sphere approximates the natural curvature of the bones in the hand of the patient to which it is to be ap plied; the provision of a splint of the type described in which means are provided for connecting the ball or sphere with the'splint enabling the relative position of the ball with respect to the splint to be varied to meet the exigency of each particular case; the provision of a construction as above described in which the connection between the splint and the ball-like handgrip may 3 be varied to position the center of the ball at different distances with respect to the plane of the associated end of the'splint; the provision of a construction as above described in which the balllike handgrip is provided with a plurality of slots therein each capable in turn of receiving the cooperating end of the splint, the angle of each slot with respect to a plane passing through the censcribed having a hollow center and an opening leading thereinto for the purpose of facilitating the securement of adhesive tape or the like to the The above being among the objects of the present invention the same consists in certain novel features of construction and combinations of parts to be hereinafter described with reference to the accompanying drawings, and then claimed, having the above and other objects in view.

In the accompanying drawings which illustrate suitable embodiments of the present invention and in which like numerals refer to like parts throughout the several different views,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view illustrating the application of a pair of splints constructed in accordance with the present invention to the forearm and the hand of a patient;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevational view of the lower splint and handgrip illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the splint and hand- .grip assembly illustrated in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line '5-5 of Fig. 4 and illustrating the manner in which the handgrip may be swivelably adjusted on the end of the splint proper;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged plan view of the upper splint illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is a side elevational view of the splint shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but illustrating the-employment of a modified form of handgrip;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged partially broken, partially sectioned side elevational view of the splint and handgrip shown in Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a plan view of the splint and handgrip shown in Fig. 9 and illustrating the manner in which the handgrip portion thereof may be varied in lateral position with respect to the longitudinal center line of the splint; Figs. 11, 12 and 13 are views of the same part as shown in Fig. 10 but illustrating the handgrip portion as being differently applied to the splint in each case through engagement of the latter with a different slot of the former whereby to enable adjustment of the two parts to enable different parts of the hand, the wrist, or the forearm of the patient to be stressed to best meet the exigency of the particular fracture to be reduced thereby;

Fig. 14 is a view similar to Figs. 10, 11, 12 and 13 but illustrating a modified form of splint; and,

Fig. 15 is a view similar to Fig. 14 but illus trating a still further modified form of splint,

Wooden or like splints have long been used in the medical profession either alone or in combination with plaster of Paris casts, in the setting or reduction of fractured bones. Those splints heretofore provided. as far as I am aware, have been of a more or less make-shift nature in most cases, most uncomfortable to the patient and in many cases questionable as to their effectiveness in holding the fractured bone in proper position particularly when employed without the use of a cooperating cast. Attempts have been made in the past to provide a splint of this general type capable of conforming to the transverse cross-sectional configuration of the patients arm or limb to which the splint is to be applied but, as far as I am aware, in such cases where an attempt has been made to render the splint flexible in a transverse direction desirable rigidity in the longitudinal direction has been sacrificed.

It is the primary object of the present invention to provide a medical or surgical splint which will have a sufiicient degree of flexibility in a transverse direction to enable it to conform to the curvature of the patients arm or leg to which it is intended to be applied and yet be of sufficient rigidity longitudinally to prevent any undesirable yielding of the fractured bone during healing. While both the splint and the handgrip portion of the present invention may be made from metal, any suitable moldable material such as plastics or the like, or may be made of wood, for the sake of economy it will usually be made from a suitable type of wood and, accordingly, in most cases reference to the latter material only will be made in the following specification for the purpose of simplicity in description, the possibility of the use of other materials being rendered self-evident thereby.

It will also be understood in the following description that where deemed desirable a plaster cast may be employed in wholly or partially surrounding relation with respect to the splints and handgrips described, although such casts will be unnecessaryin most cases. This fact being understood no further reference to such casts will be necessary.

Referring now to the accompanying drawings and particularly to Fig. 1, the application of splints to the forearm and hand of a patient re quiring the reduction of a simple Colles fracture. where it is desired to carry the knuckles of the hand in the plane with a point in the wrist and upper forearm,.is illustrated. The splints in this case consist of a lower splint indicated generally at 20 provided with a handgrip portion 22 adapted to be grasped by the hand 24 of the patient, and an upper splint indicated generally at 26 applied to the outer side of the forearm of the patient and extending down over the wrist thereof, the wrist and lower forearm of the patient being rigidly held between the splints 20 and 26 by binding the two together by means of tape or the like 28 encircling the same. The upper splint 26 will not be required in all cases but is shown by way of illustration of one use to which this particular type of splint may be applied.

Referring now to Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 5 which illustrate the construction of the lower splint 20 and handgrip 22 in detail, it will be seen that the splint 20 is formed from a relatively wide but thin strip of suitable wood to provide a main body portion 30 and an end portion 32 connected thereto by a curved neck portion 33. The main body portion 30 is relatively straight longitudinally but is of curved transverse section, such curvature preferably being such as to approximately fit the inner surface of the forearm of an average patient. This main body portion 30 of the splint 20 is provided with a central longitudinally extending slot 34 extending therethrough and a pair of slots 3-5 positioned in spaced relation one on each side of the slot 34. The slots 34 and 36 are provided for two purposes, one of which is to provide ventilation through the splint and the more important of which is to impart transverse flexibility to the main body portion of the splint, this feature being enhanced by extending these slots so as to overlap one another longitudinally of the splint, as viewed from the side of the splint. The slots 36 are preferably extended through the inner end of the main body portion as illustrated in Fig. 3 thereby to separate the inner end of the main body portion into three distinct sections to enhance the fiexi bility at this end. The. outermost slots 36 are preferably maintained at:a substantial distance inwardly from the marginal side edges of the main body portion 30 so that these side edge por tions, being relatively wide and being positioned with their approximate plane at an angle to each other, will impart a material longitudinal rigidity to the splints.

The thickness of theisplint is preferably such in relation to the material from which it. is formed as to impartto the splint a sufficient flexibility transversely-thereof which will permit ii; to be drawn into conformity with the trans- I verse curvature of the patients forearm when bound thereto aswith tape or the like, but of suflicient thickness-as-to render it of sufficient rigidity longitudinally thereof to prevent any undesired movement between the two parts of the fractured bone duringreduction of the fracture.

The particular typ of wood or of other material from which the splint ismade is preferablysuch as to permit X-rays to be taken therethrough I fications of the construction hereinafter described various angular relationships of the plane of the end of the splint, corresponding with the end 32, with respect to the general plane of the main body portion of the splint; is illustrated. Where the end portion 32 is arranged with the plane of its thickness at an angle to the general plane of thickness of the main body portion 30 the slot 34 is preferably extended into the curved neck portion 33 of the splint connecting the end portion 32 of the main body portion 33, this particularly being preferable to facilitate the shaping during manufacture and which in the case of wood splints is preferably accomplished by steaming the splint and clamping it to a form or suitable shape until dry. The extension of the slot 34 into the neck 33 is not sufficient to impart material transverse flexibility to this curved neck portion but inasmuch as there is no necessity for the end portion 32 to be transversely flexible this is unimportant. The end portion It will be understood that splints such as the splint 20 shown are made in right and left with a neck portion connecting the end 32 and the main body 30 offset to the left in plan view for accommodation of the left arm and hand of a patient and to the right for accommodation of the right hand and arm of the patient, the par-' ticularsplint shown by way of illustration being that adapted for application to the left arm and the hand of a patient. In such case it will be observed that the approximate line of the outer end surface of the head 38 is positioned at an angle to a plane perpendicular to the axial line of the main body portion 30 and the grip 22'is applied thereto in approximate parallelism with the line of the outer end of the head 38. HoW ever, because it is desirable to cock the Wrist of a patient either one way or another in order to properly reduce the fracture, depending upon the type and position of the fracture, the sides of the head 38 are curved in plan view and the Width of the slot 43 in the handgrip'ZZ is preferably such as to relatively closely receive the head therein to prevent undesirable lateral movement of one with respect to the other. The curved side portions of the head 38 permit the handgrip 22 to be swiveled thereon as brought out in Fig. 5 so that the angularity of the plane of thickness of the grip 22 with respect to the axial line of the splint may be varied to suit the particular condition met with when in serv ice. After the splint and the grip 22 has been applied to the patient to determine the desired angularity of the grip 22 with respect to the splint, it is then removed and two or more tacks, brads, or the like 52 are driven into the handgrip 22 and through the head 38 received in the groove 49 thereof so as to fix the grip 22 in position on the splint 20. 7

From the above it will be appreciated that in accordance with the present invention a splint of sufficient transverse flexibility to permit it to be readily caused to conform to the shape of a patients arm, and yet of sufficient longitudinal rigidity to prevent yielding in this direction, is provided and that a handgrip is associated therewith which may be varied in position on the end of the splint to accommodate either the particular shape of the patients hand or to enable a stress of the desired character to be applied to the patients hand or forearm to best enable a particular fracture to be reduced. Furthermore by providing a number of such splints each 32 itself and particularly the extremity thereof is preferably of flat configuration transversely thereof.

From an inspection of Figs. 3 and 5 it will be noted that the free extremity of the end portion 32 is laterally enlarged to form a head 38. The head 38 is received in a slot 40 formed in the handgrip portion 22. The handgrip portion 22 is formed from a thicker piece of wood arranged with the plane of its thickness approximately perpendicular to the plane of the head 38. It is prefer-ably made of a piece of wood having a thickness of between three-quarters and one inch and is preferably shaped to provide one end thereof of greater height than the opposite end thereof and the upper surface thereof is preferably rounded off where it is received in th palm of the hand. The higher end of the grip 22 is always positioned toward the thumb of the patient.

having the plane of its end portion arranged at a different angle with respect to the genera-l plane of the main body portion thereof, substantially any desired variation in the tension on various parts of the patients forearm may be obtained to best reduce a particular type and location of fracture. 1

The use of the handgrip 22 in conjunction with the splint serves two different purposes. In' cases where binding of the fingers to the handgrip 22 is not required, the latter is often desirable in order to better rest the hand of the patient and 'reduce discoinforture occasioned by the application of the cooperating splint. Additionally it is often desirable to definitely hold the hand of the patient in a predetermined position and against grip 22 permits the desired positioning and securement of the hand without undue discomforture to the patient.

- The employment of the handgrip 22 or equivalent handgrip is not essential in the practices of the broader phases of the present invention. For instance, in Fig. 1, it will be apparent that the splint 26 includes no associated hand grip nor would the use of a handgrip be possible in connection therewith. The splint 26 is shown in detail in Figs. 6 and 7 from which it will be observed that it more or less conforms with the main body portion of the splint 26. In other words it is of curved cross-sectional configuration throughout its length, it is provided with central slots 44 and laterally offset pairs of slots 46, each pair of slots 46 longitudinally overlapping an end of a central slot 44. In the particular case shown, the slots 46 at the inner end of the splint extend through the corresponding ends of the splint the same as in the splint 26 but in this case, a second central slot 44 is provided at the forward end of the splint and in this case this particular slot extends outwardly through the forward end of the splint. As in the case of the splint 26, the side slots 46 are positioned a material distance inwardly from the side margins of the splint so as to provide opposite side marginal portions of substantial width which, because of the transverse curvature of the splint, are positioned in approximate planes disposed at angles to each other to thereby impart added rigidity to the splint in a direction longitudinally thereof, while the slots 44 and 46 impart sufficient transverse flexibility to the splint to enable it to be readily brought into conformance to the transverse curvature of the arm, limb or other part of the body of the patient to which it is applied. Although the type of splint illustrated at 26 is preferably substantially straight as indicated, it may be longitudinally curved if desired and it may be made various lengths to fit the various parts of the arms or limbs of patients of various sizes, and may be used either singly or in multiple in the reduction of a fracture.

In Figs. 8 to 13, inclusive, a slightly different form of splint and a different form of handgrip portion is illustrated. This combination may be used for the same purpose as splint 26 and handgrip 22 previously described, but, in addition, the handgrip portion, which may be employed with the same type of splint as the splint 26, or other forms of splints constructed in accordance with the present invention, is particularly adaptable for use in connection with a fracture of different bones of the hand. The splint itself, which is indicated generally at 56, is essentially the same as the splint previously described except that the end portion is shown as extending in the same general plane as the main body portion of the splint and as not being laterally offset, this permitting it to be used either as a right or a left. The main body portion of the splint 56 is curved in transverse section and its outer end portion 52 is planar and is provided with a head 54 of transversely increased dimension, the outer edge portions of which are curved in a manner similar to and for the same purpose as the sides of the head 38 previously described.

The handgrip portion of the splint shown in Figs. 8 to 13, inclusive, is indicated at 56 and is actually formed as part of a ball or sphere or to a shape approximately conforming to a ball or sphere. It is provided with at least oneslot and preferably, as will be more fully explained, a

plurality of slots 58, 66, 62, and 64 arranged in angularly spaced relation around the grip and in any one of which the head. 54 of the splint 56 may be received. Because of the curved side edges of the head. 54 and splint 56, the grip 56 may be swiveled to bring this center to either one side or the other of the longitudinal center line of the splint 56 as viewed in plan view as illustrated in Fig. 10, thus to accommodate either the right or left hand of the patient and to stress various parts of the wrist or forearm to meet the exigencies of any particular situation.

The ball grip 56 is preferably hollow as illustrated and one face thereof is flattened off as at 66 so as to provide an opening leading into the hollow interior of the ball for purposes which will hereinafter be more fully explained. However, the face 66 is useful at this point in order to explain the differences in the relation of the slots 58, 66, 62 and 64 with respect to each other. As illustrated in Fig. 9, slot 58 is arranged with the plane of its faces in approximate parallel relation with respect to the face 66, this position of the slot being such that when the cooperating ends of splint 56 is received therein, the center of the ball grip 56 is positioned just a slight amount above the plane of the outer ends of splint 56 as illustrated in Fig. 9. The slot 66, as best brought out in Fig. 11, is disposed at such an angle with respect to the plane of the face 66 that when the end of the splint 56 is received therein, the plane of the face 66 is disposed at an angle with respect to the general plane of the splint 56, as illustrated in Fig. 11, to bring the center of the ball grip 56 slightly below the plane of the outer end of the splint 56. The plane of the slot 64, as illustrated in Fig. 13, is'such that when the end of the splint 56 is received therein, the center of the ball grip 56 is disposed still further below the plane of the outer end of the splint 56 and with the plane of the face 66 disposed at still a greater angle with respect to the splint 56. When the outer end of the splint 56 is received in the slot 62, the center of the ball grip 56 is disposed at a greater distance above the plane of the outer ends of splint 56 than when received in the slot 58 and as illustrated in Fig. 9. The grip 56 may be locked in any one of these slots and in-the desired swivelably adjusted position brought out in Fig. 10, in the same general manner as illustrated in connection with the handgrip 22 on the splint 26 first described, namely by the use of tacks, brads, or the like 68.

The diameter of the ball end 56 is preferably such as to fit the curvature of the palm and fingers of the patient when in position of natural repose. For a patient having an average size of hand, this requires a ball or sphere of approximately three and one-half inches in diameter. I have found that by the use of this ball type of grip a patients hand may be securely bound to it without causing the patient the almost unbearable pain and aching so commonly associated with the reduction of fractures of the bones of the hand and fingers with the conventional type of straight or flat splints. Furthermore, it is invaluable in the reduction of fracture of the entire hand and of broken or fractured phalanxes and metacarpals inasmuch as it holds these bones at their natural curvature and prevents exostosis of bone formation from being built up between the inner margins of the break as invariably occurs in the reduction of fractures of bones of the hand by use of the ordinary straight or Banjo type of splint.

.tance of the palmer arches.

It is also desired to call to attention another advantage of this ball type of grip permitting arrangement of the hand in the natural position of grasp. This advantage is that it takes into consideration the arched engagement of the anatomy of the hand and the functional impor- Many disfunctioning hands will be found to have been caused by disregard of the arch anatomy of the hand in attempting to reduce the fracture of some part thereof. It is my experience that the natural curvature and arches of the hand and the desirability of maintaining the same in the reduction of a fracture has not received proper emphasis in the past. With the use of a splint and a ball grip as above described it is impossible to oblit erate the palmer arches. The longitudinal arches .(the carpus, metacarpus and straight fiexion adopted by the digits at rest), the proximal and the distal transverse arches, should not be flattened during the reduction of a fracture as the flattening of any of these arches plays a part in the hyperex-tension deformity too often seen. The flexibility of the arches are increased or decreased by muscular action and,

are, in active use of the hand, constantly changing according to the needs of function. The muscles of the thernar and thehypo-thenar eminences play a predominant roll in controlling these movements, which are called-forth chiefly by opposition of the flngers and thumb. The use of improper splints which flatten the hand causes pressure injury and atrophy of these muscles, without which proper functioning of the hand is impossible.

Another advantage of the use of the multiple slots of varying angularity is that the ball grip 56 may be located with respect to the plane of the splint so as to cook the hand in any desired position to obtain the desired tension in various parts of the hand, wrist, or forearm best fitted to the reduction of a particular fracture. Where the type of fracture requires an extreme amount of cocking of the hand with respect to the plane of the splint, it may be required to position the ball end 56 as illustrated in either Figs. 12 or 13. The type illustrated in these figures is designed for use in the reduction of a Colles fracture with the accompanying displacement of one or more carpus or where there is a further carpus involvement such as impaction, dislocation or fracture, the curvature of the ball grip in such case being of material advantage in maintaining the longitudinal arch and the transverse arches of the carpal area in their naturally curved condition. This extreme amount of cooking of the hand is liable to become extremely tiresome to the patient with the passage of time. In such case, after the hand has been held in position sufficiently long to effect an initial knitting action, the splint may be removed and the ball end 55 removed and replaced at a smaller angle with respect to the general plane of the splint, and the splint re-applied, so as to reduce to a great measure the inconvenience to the patient.

As perhaps best brought out in Fig. 8, where a handgrip of the ball type is employed, it is positioned to be received in the palm of the patients hand, and then such necessary tape or other fastenings ar attached to the fingers and/or the hand of the patient and extended down over the edge 66 of the ball end and the ends of the tape turned inwardly and upwardly on the interior surface of the ball ends to which they may be adhered. This ability to turn the end of the tap under and over the edge of the ball ends provides a secure lock for the tape and prevents the possibility of inadvertent displacement of the same which might be detrimental to the welfare of the patient.

In Figs. 14 and 15, the same ball end 56 is shown applied to splints of somewhat modified character. In Fig; 14 the splint is indicated generally at 10 and inFig. 15, generally at 88. Both the splints Hi and may be assumed to be of the same general shape in plan View as the splint 50 but it Will be appreciated that they may also be of the same general type first described if found either desirable or necessary. The main difference between the splint l0 and the splint 50 is that the splint i9 is provided with an upwardly extending bulge or roll 12 intermediate the main body portion of the splint and the outer end thereof which is connected to the ball end 56. The bugle or roll 12 is shaped to support the wrist of the patient immediately inwardly of the palm of the hand and is desirable under certain conditions in the reduction of certain types of fractures, particularly ofv the wrist. It will be understood that the ball end 56,may.be secured to the splint lllthrough any one of the various slots therein, the same as in the previously described construction and it may be swiveled upon th end ofthe splint in the same manner as illustrated in Fig. 10 of the'previously described construction. v A I The splint 80, as illustratedin Fig. 15, is provided with an end portion 82, the plane of which is disposed at a material angle, which may be for instance 30", 45 or at a greater angularity with respect to the general plane of the main body portion of the splint 80. This type of splint has been found valuable particularly in the reduction of a simple Colles fracture, where it is desirous of carrying the knuckues in a plane with a point in the wrist and upper forearm. The seat of a Colles fracture is compared to that of an inverted dinner fork and is known as the silver fork deformity, and with the possibility of varying the position of the ball grip with respect to the splints both in the direction illustrated in Fig. 10 and in the manner illustrated in Figs. 9, 11, 12 and 13, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that following the plane of Cotton and Loder, if the ulna is the fixed point about which the hand is displaced, it should be made the fixed point for effecting and maintaining reduction. Since the displacement of the lower fragments of the ulna and radius and hand is in the direction of extension and supination, correction is to be obtained by the positions of palmer flexion and pronation. With the placing of the ball grip 56 to meet the requirements of the fracture, adduction, abduction, or deviations can be made in order to maintain the correction. These positions of palmer flexion, pronation and deviation have proved their value in reduction of diflicult cases, but it is found that early restoration to normal position of function is highly desirable and should be modified as soon as possible. This may be readily accomplished with the construction shown by removing the ball grip 56 and replacing it on the splint with the plane of the face 65 arranged to reduce the angularity of the parts affected. I have found that reduction of fractures of the type described is greatly facilitated by the above practices and the return of the parts to normal function is enhanced. By employing a splint of this type with an end portion such as the end portion 82, where its plane is disposed of the main body portion of the splint, regardless of whether the ball end 56 is employed -or whether a grip such as the grip 22 is employed, I have found that reduction-of fractures of the type described is greatly facilitated.

Itwill be understood that the specific examples of the invention herein shown and described'are illustrative rather than limiting intheir nature and, accordingly, it will be understood that formal changes may be made in the specific embodiments of the invention described without departing from the spirit or substance of the invention, the scope of which is commensurate with-the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a surgical splint device combination, an

elongated splint portion adapted fo'r-securement 'to the forearm of a patient and ahandgrip portion carried thereby and adapted to receive the hand of a patient, said handgrip portion'formed to represent-at leasta part'of a sphere and of a size to approximately conform to the natural curvature of the innersurface of the hand of a patient when in a position of'natural repose.

2. In combination, a handgrip formed to represent at least part of a'spherical surface and having a slot therein, and a surgical splintadaptedfor securement' to the forearm of a patient,

having an end received in said slot.

3. In a surgical splint device, in combination, a handgrip-member formedto present at least part-'ofa spherical surface andihaving aplurality of slots therein, the plane of each .slot passing through said handgrip in a different relation -with=1'-espect to the center of said sphere as compared to the remaining slots therein, and an ,elongatedsplint portion adapted for reception of --a forearm of a patient and receivable in any one of said slots.

:4. -A surgical splint comprising an elongated member of substantial-widthand relatively small thickness including-amain-body portion and an end portion, and a handgrip portion having a slot therein in which an end ofsaid splint 'is received and relatively swivelable with respect thereto, and-means for rsecuring'sa'id handgrip portion in swivelably adjusted relation on the end of said splint portion, said handgrip portion being formed to present-at least a part of approxi-

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Classifications
U.S. Classification602/21
International ClassificationA61F5/04, A61F5/058
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/05866
European ClassificationA61F5/058H4B