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Publication numberUS2319526 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1943
Filing dateAug 28, 1942
Priority dateAug 28, 1942
Publication numberUS 2319526 A, US 2319526A, US-A-2319526, US2319526 A, US2319526A
InventorsWearn Stanley J
Original AssigneeWearn Stanley J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Screed support
US 2319526 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

My 18, 1943 5. J. WEARN SCREED SUPPORT Filed Aug. 28, 1942 INVENTOR."

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Patented May 18, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,319,526 SCREED sUProa'r Stanley J. Wearn, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application August 28, 1942, Serial No. 456,466

6 Claims. (01. 72-128) The present invention relates to supports and has particular reference to a device for supporting screeds, such as used in surfacing concrete floors and roadways.

It is the general object of the invention to provide a simple, convenient and inexpensive device for supporting screeds or the like. It is an important object to provide a support on which a screed may be laid and which will maintain the screed firmly in position. Another object is to provide improved means for adjusting the device vertically and for maintaining it firmly in vertically adjusted position. A further object is the provision of improved construction of the device, whereby seating of the support in the ground is greatly facilitated.

These and other objects of the invention, as well as the many advantageous features thereof, will be readily appreciated upon perusal of the following detailed description and reference is invited to the accompanying drawing, in which preferred forms of my invention are illustrated.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view illustrating the device of the invention in its simplest form;

Fig. 2 is a substantially corresponding plan view of the device;

Figs. 3 and 4 show a modified form of the device in which the parts are designed and arranged to facilitate driving of the device into the ground; and Figs. 5 and 6 illustrate further modifications in means for adjusting the height of the support.

The device of Fig. 1 comprises a stake I, which terminates at the top in a grooved head, or saddle 2, of a shape to receive a screed in the form of a cylindrical rod or pipe A. A plate 3 is centrally perforated to slide on the stake l, and it is fitted with a set screw 4. It is important to note that, because the saddle is substantially semicircular, the upper half of the screed is entirely unobstructed.

In practice a series of supports are seated in the ground by driving the stake of each support down far enough to place the saddle at the proper height, whereupon the plate is firmly pressed against the ground surface and there locked in position by means of the set screw 4 to maintain the device securely in position. The screed is preferably a long piece of straight rod or pipe, which may be pushed along axially in the supports as the concrete surfacing progresses.

This method offers a distinct advantage over the conventional manner of clamping the screeds in position in extended series, in that no joints between abutting screed ends are present to form breaks in the continuity of the finished surface. Also, as the screed gradually is advanced along and beyond the supports, it is possible to withdraw the latter successively to be again seated in advance of the axially slidable screed. In this manner, it is possible to continue floor and road surfacing indefinitely with a pair of screeds and a few supports along each side edge of the surface to be finished.

Ordinarily, the device of Fig. 1 functions satisfactorily. Should it, however, be found difficult to seat the support in the ground to the proper height, it may be found advantageous to embody means for finer adjustment of the support after seating. This may be accomplished, as indicated in Figs. 3 and 41, by detachably fitting a saddle 6 on a plain stake l for axial adjustment thereon. The saddle may then be locked in position in any suitable manner, as by'means of a set screw 8.

One advantage of this construction is that the seating of the device is facilitated by driving the stake into the ground to approximately the proper height and then adjusting the saddle thereon until the correct height is obtained. Another advantage in the use of this form of device is that no danger is present of damaging the saddle when it is found necessary to employ a hammer or sledge to seat the stake. Should it be found that danger is present of hammer blows upsetting the upper end of a soft metal stake, it is a simple matter to seat a cap 9 on the end thereof during this operation, substantially as indicated in Fig. 4.

While screw threads are generally objectionable in devices of the character herein described, it may at times be found advantageous to employ such screw threads for the purpose of adjustment. To this end, the stake ID of Fig. 5 is shown threaded to engage screw threads of the plate II. The latter is, after the stake has been correctly seated in the ground, rotated on the stake until it rests firmly on the ground surface. No set screw is in this case required.

A similar result may be obtained, substantially as indicated in Fig. 6, by fitting the detachable saddle [5 on screwthreads at the upper end of the stem l6.

While I have described preferred forms of the invention it will, of course, be understood that other modifications may be embodied within the scope of the claims hereto appended, without departing from the spirit of the invention. Where the screed support is to be seated in wooden on the end of said stake for axial adjustment thereon, a ground-engaging plate axially adjustable on the stake, and means for locking said plate in position on the stake.

3. A support for a cylindrical screed comprising, a stake terminating at the top in a head shaped to receive said screed, and a ground-engaging member axially adjustable on said stake.

4. A support for a cylindrical screed comprising, a stake terminating at the top in a head shaped to receive and firmly to hold said screed, a ground-engaging member axially adjustable on said stake, and means for locking said memher in adjusted position on the stake.

5. A support for a cylindrical screed comprising, a stake, a saddle shaped to receive said screed and having a pendant socket fitted to encompass and axially adjustable on said stake, and a ground-engaging member axially adjustable on the stake.

6. A support for a cylindrical screed comprising, a stake threaded at the top, a saddle shaped to receive and firmly to hold said screed, said saddle having internal screw threads seatable on the end threads of the stake, and a groundengaging member axially adjustable on the stake.

STANLEY J. WEARN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2867041 *Apr 10, 1957Jan 6, 1959Mcmillan Floor Products CompanScreed support and method of using
US3284973 *Apr 10, 1964Nov 15, 1966AmesCement finishing apparatus
US3295281 *Apr 4, 1962Jan 3, 1967Dixon Daniel RBuilding block construction with spacer and method of fabricating the block
US5212919 *May 11, 1992May 25, 1993Shaw Lee ANelson stud screed post assembly
US5301485 *Jan 27, 1992Apr 12, 1994Shaw Lee ANelson stud screed post assembly
US5678952 *Nov 16, 1995Oct 21, 1997Shaw; Lee A.Concrete dowel placement apparatus
US5934821 *May 30, 1997Aug 10, 1999Shaw; Lee A.Concrete dowel placement apparatus
US6210070Apr 14, 1999Apr 3, 2001Ron D. ShawConcrete dowel slip tube with clip
US6223495Feb 26, 1999May 1, 2001Lee A. ShawVibrating screed with rollers
US6719486 *Aug 8, 2002Apr 13, 2004Andrew D. CraghanApparatus for screeding
US6820390 *Oct 16, 2002Nov 23, 2004Todd M. SchulzeWeldment plate spacer support
US6866445Jun 24, 2002Mar 15, 2005Paul M. SemlerScreed ski and support system and method
US7065930Oct 13, 2004Jun 27, 2006Schulze Todd MWeldment plate spacer support
US7192216Feb 25, 2005Mar 20, 2007Michael CasaleHeight adjustable screed and method
US7874762Sep 17, 2009Jan 25, 2011Shaw & Sons, Inc.Dowel device with closed end speed cover
US8007199Dec 16, 2010Aug 30, 2011Shaw & Sons, Inc.Dowel device with closed end speed cover
US9340969Nov 13, 2014May 17, 2016Shaw & Sons, Inc.Crush zone dowel tube
US9546456Apr 13, 2016Jan 17, 2017Shaw & Sons, Inc.Crush zone dowel tube
US9617694Dec 4, 2015Apr 11, 2017Shaw & Sons, Inc.Concrete dowel system
US20030037505 *Oct 16, 2002Feb 27, 2003Schulze Todd M.Weldment plate spacer support
US20050082460 *Oct 13, 2004Apr 21, 2005Schulze Todd M.Weldment plate spacer support
US20060185282 *Apr 21, 2006Aug 24, 2006Schulze Todd MWeldment plate stud extender support
US20060192073 *Feb 25, 2005Aug 31, 2006Michael CasaleHeight adjustable screed and method
US20070134063 *Dec 14, 2005Jun 14, 2007Shaw And Sons, Inc.Dowel device with closed end speed cover
US20080085156 *Dec 6, 2007Apr 10, 2008Shaw Lee ADowel device with closed end speed cover
US20090229214 *Mar 12, 2008Sep 17, 2009Nelson Steven JFoam-concrete rebar tie
US20100003080 *Sep 17, 2009Jan 7, 2010Shaw Lee ADowel device with closed end speed cover
US20100319295 *Aug 10, 2010Dec 23, 2010Nelson Steven JFoam-concrete rebar tie
US20110085857 *Dec 16, 2010Apr 14, 2011Shaw Lee ADowel device with closed end speed cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/678
International ClassificationE01C19/50, E04F21/05, E04F21/02, E01C19/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/502, E04F21/05
European ClassificationE01C19/50B, E04F21/05