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Publication numberUS2319682 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1943
Filing dateAug 14, 1940
Priority dateAug 14, 1940
Publication numberUS 2319682 A, US 2319682A, US-A-2319682, US2319682 A, US2319682A
InventorsArey Fred C, Hibner De Los E
Original AssigneeVulcan Soot Blower Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soot blower
US 2319682 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 18, 1943 DE Los E. HIBNER ETAL SOOT BLOWER Filed Aug. 14, 1940 6 Sheets-Sheet l Wiikex:

DE LOS E. HIBNER EI'AL ,682

SOOT BLOWER May 13, 1943 6 Sheet s-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 14, 1940 DE LOS E. HIBNER ETAL 2,319,682

May 18, 1943 s00? BLOWER Filed Aug. 14, 1940 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 a d W, w W w a I15! H H l E N 11 Q I Q m .m% um a .QL mm 3 May 18, 1943 DE Los E. HIBNER Hm. I 2,319,632

SOOT BLOWER s Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 14, 1940 May 18, 1943 I DE 1.03 E. HIBNER arm. 2,319,632

' 500T BLOWER Filed Aug. 14, 1940 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 /g I y w May 18, 1943 V DE'LOS EHIBNER mp 8 SOOT BLOWER Filed Aug. 14, 1940 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 SOV/PCFOF I I Mair. 2. 6%?6 Wag blowing unit present invention, setting which is shown in section;

Patented May 18, 1943 800'! BLOWER Bois, and Fred C. Arey,

'De 1.05 E. Hibner, Du

Freeport, Pa... assignors to Corporation, a corporation of Vulcan Soot Blower Pennsylvania Application August 14, 1940, sci-mm. 352,528

9 Claims. (01. 1 22-392) In the modern types of soot blowers devices for steam boilers, the jetting elements or nozzles are permanently located in furnaces or combustion chambers where they are subjected to intense heat. Whereas the boiler tubes are cooled through contact with the water that is being converted into steam, the usual jetting element or nozzle of a soot blowing unit is left unprotected except during the short and infrequent in- K tervals during whichcleaning fluids are flowing through the same. The object of the present invention is to protect soot blowing elements from the intense heat to which the usual devices are subjected during their periods of idleness.

While it is possible to provide the blowing elements with means to cause cooling fluids to carry away heat that is absorbed or would otherwise be absorbed by the elements, this method of cooling is not entirely satisfactory. Therefore, the object of the present invention may further be said to make it possible effectively to guard against overheating the blowing elements during their idle periods, without the use of cooling fluids or the like.

In carrying out the present invention, each blowing element is mounted so as to be movable between a working position and an idle position wherein at least the greater part thereof lies beyond the influence of the furnace heat. Therefore, viewed in one of its aspects, the present invention may be said to have for its object to.produce a simple and novel soot blower blowing unit, the 'actua1 blowing element of which may be shifted between a working .position within a furnace or combustion'chamber and a position in which it may remain comparatively cool.

tion taken on line 2--2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a vertical axial section taken on line 3-'-3 of Fig. 2, but on a much larger scale, and the blowing element having been shifted from the idle position in Figs. 1 and 2 to the working position; Fig. 4 is a. section on line 4-4 of Fig. 3; Fig. 5 is a section on line 5'-5 of Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a section on line 6-6 of Fig. 4; Fig. 'l is a section through the reversing valve; Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 5,

but on'a larger scale and showing only a fragment of the apparatus; Fig. 9 is a view, partly in elevation looking at the righthand side of the apparatus as it appears in Fig. 8, with the casing omitted, while the reversing valve is shown in section corresponding to the plane of line 9-9 of Fig. 8; Fig. 10 is a section through the controlling panel on line l0l0 of Fig. 1, but on a much larger scale; Fig. 11 is a rear view of the controlling panel, on the same scale as Fig. 10, portions being broken away; and Fig. 12 is a diagram illustrating the various valves and power devices.

Referring to the drawings, A represents a thick wall of a boiler setting through which a tubular soot blowing element is adapted to extend from a supporting head on the exterior of the wall. In the present instance the tubular' blowin element I has on its inner or free end a nozzle or distributor 2 for the cleaning fluid. At times when cleaning fluid is being discharged from the nozzle, the latter must lie within the furnace or combustion chamber on the inner side of the boiler setting where the heat is so intense that In a still further aspect, the present invention may be said to have for its object to produce a simple and novel operating and control system for the type of unit just described, whereby a cycle is started, carried out and finally ended, automatically upon the mere shifting of a handle, lever or other simple controlling device.

The various features of novelty whereby the present invention is characterized will hereinafter be pointed out with particularity in the claims; but, for a full understanding of the present invention and of its objects and advantages, reference may be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a side view of a complete automatic arranged in accordance with the applied to the wall of a boiler Fig. 2 is a secthe life of the nozzle is short if the nozzle be left in its working position. One of the features of the present invention is to make it possible to withdraw the nozzle from the zone of intense heat except at times when it is required to discharge cleaning fluid. In the arrangement illustrated, the cleaning element is so mounted and the. wall A is of such thickness, that the nozzle may be retracted within a chamber or recess B extending into the wall A from the inner face. when the nozzle lies within this recess or chamber, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, it is shielded against the intense heat of the furnace and its useful life is'therefore indennitely prolonged. lnthe arrangement shown. the blowing element l extends horizontally through and is lengthwise slidable and rotatable in a hollow stationary head 3 lying on the outside of and mounted on the wall A. 'As best shown in Fig. 3, the head is provided with two aligned stuffing box I and I, at the inner and outer ends thereof, respectively, surrounding the blowing element and preventing the escape of steam or other cleaning fluid past the outer surfac at said element; The blowing element contain slibles 8 through which steam or other cleaning fluid may enter from the interior of the head.

Cleaning fluid, usually steam, enters the head through a tubular inlet portion I at the bottom. A partition or diaphragm 8 separates the space within the member I from that within the head proper, there being a inlet 9 opening in this partition. This inlet controlled by a valve III in the form of a cup-shaped piston whose axis is parallel to the axis of the blowing element. This valve, as is common in soot blowers, is adapted to be closed by a spring ll and fluid pressure behind the same and to be opened by fluid pressure acting against the opposite pushed in as in Fig. 4, the space behind the main valve 18 exhausts through the vent 21. However, when the stud 2| moves away from the pilot valve, the steam entering the pilot valve casing through pipe 23 shifts the movable member of the latter valve so as to establish communication between pipes 23 and 25.

At times when the blowing element is discharging cleaning fiuid, itmust also be turned so as to cau'sethe jets or streams to sweep over i a considerable area. In the arrangement shown,

side thereof. Thus, when there is only atmos-. I

pheric pressure in the inlet member I, the spring holds the valve closed. When steamds turned on and is permitted to flow into the space behind ,the valve, the valve still remains closed.

However, if the space behind the valve is vented to atmosphere, the pressure of the steam against the opposite side of the valve is sufiicient to force the valve open, as indicated in Fig. 3, againstwthe resistance'of the spring. The operation of the valve II is controlled by the usual pilot valve l2, best shown in Fig. 4.

The blowing element I may conveniently be moved lengthwise between its working and idle positions by means of a piston l4 slidable in a. long cylinder II fastened on top of the head 3 with its axis parallel with that of the blowing element. The piston is connected to .what may be termed the front end of a long piston rod I6 that projects out beyond the rear end of the cylinder. The rear end of the piston rod passes through and is fixed to the front wall of a housing I! that lies behind the head 3 and is slidably mounted on two sturdy rods l8 fixed to the head 8 and extending rearwardly therefrom on opposite sides of and parallel to the axis of the blowing element. The'rear or outer end of the blowing element is closed and is provided with an extension in the form of a stub shaft IQ of reduced diameter that extends entirely this rotation is caused by a motor 28 mounted on the front side of the housing I! and having its shaft 28 extending through the front wall pot the housing and into driving connection with the first element of a speed-reducing gearing 30, the final element of which is a large gear wheel 3| keyed to a sleeve 32 which surrounds and is in turn keyed to the stub shaft l9. In the particular arrangement shown, the blowing element is not turned continuously in one. direction but is given oscillatory movements of variable, predetermined angular lengths. Consethrough the housing. A nut 28 on the rear end of the stub shaft secures the housing and the blowing element together. i

As best shown in Fig. 4, the housing has a the front a forwardly projecting lengthwise adjustable stud 2| that is aligned with the stem of the pilot valve II. The parts are so proportioned that, as the piston ll approaches its extreme forward position, the stud strikes the stem of the pilot valve and forces that valve forward into the position that causes the space behind the main valve M to be vented and that valve to open if steam has been turned on. Conversely, as the housing starts to retreat, the stud moves away from the pilot valve and thus causes the stem supply to the blowing element to be shut oil. The manner in which the pilot valve controls the main valve can be seen in Figs. 1, 3 and 4.- Thus, there is a small pipe 23 leading from the righthand side of the partition 8 in Fig. 3 to the forward end of the casing member of the pilot valve; there is also a pipe 25 leading from the space behind the valve ii to a port 28 in. the pilot valve casing; and there is a vent 21 to atmosphere in the'rear end of the pilot valve casing. The parts are so proportioned thatwhen the movable member of the pilot valve is quently, means must be provided for energizing and de-energizing the motor and also for reversing the same.

, Since the power for'shifting the blowing element between its working and ,idle positions is preferably compressed air, the motor for turning the blowing element may advantageously be of the pneumatic. type.

It will be seen-that the hear or outer end .of the piston rod licontains a long axial ,bore 34 of considerable diameter and that one or -more ports 35, extending through the surrounding wall of the rod, place the bore in communication with the space within the cylinder I5 at times when the piston is in its forward position, 'as indicated in Fig. 3. The bore communicates with a chamber within a nut-like casing 36 screwed upon the rear end of the piston rod within the housing I! and serving .to clamp the piston rod to the front wall of the housing. Within this casing is a reversing valve 31 which admits air from the bore 34 into either of two pipes 38 and 39 leading to the motor, connecting each of these pipes to atmosphere while the other is connected to the bore. Consequently, with the piston I I in the rear end of the'cylinder, as in Figs. 1 and 2, the ports," find themselves far to the rear of the cylinder and opening into atmosphere. Therefore, if air is admitted into position, carrying the blowing element from the idle to the working position, not only does steam begin to flow throughv the cleaning element, but the motorv begins to turn, the latter. Thereafter. the steps previously taken'must be reversed so as to shut off the steam, stop the 'motor and carry the nozzle of the blowing element back into its protecting recess or chamber. The point at which this restoration of the initial idle conditions occurs .is conveniently controlled by the common expedient of providing the large gear wheel 3| with a .pair of-stops 48 andthat block or cam which lies be spaced at any angular distance from each other.

as will hereinafter be explained, shift the reversing valve and also shut off the supply of air to the rear end of the cylinder l5 (and thus to the motor) and cause air to be admitted into the front end of the cylinder so as to push the piston back into the rear end of the cylinder.

The reversing valve is preferably of the snap action type so that just as the end of each tuming movement is reached, the valve is quickly thrown from one position to the other. The operating mechanism for the reversing'valve is best shown in Figs. 3, 4, 5, 8 and 9. It will be seen that the movable member of the reversing valve has a readwardly-extending stem 43 to the extreme end of which is fixed a radial arm 44. On this stem, in front of the arm 44, is a loose radial arm 45 having fastened thereto a pinion 46. The free ends of the arms 44 and 45 are connected together by a tension spring 41 of such length that normally the two arms are held at about right angles to each other, as in Fig. 8. Mounted upon a stationary, vertical plate 48 arranged within and transversely of the housing" is a rocking toothed segment 49 meshing valve with the pinion 46. This segment is provided with a finger 5|! that projects into the circular path of travel of the stop pins 40 and 4| on the gear wheel 3|.

Assuming that as viewed in Fig. 5 the gear wheel is turning in the clockwise direction, it will be seen that the pin 40 is about to engage with the finger 50. As the gear continues to turn. the pin contacts the finger and drives it ahead so as to turn the segment 49 in the counterclockwise direction This causes the pinion 45 and the arm 45 to turn in the clockwise direction, thus placing the spring 41 under tension. As soon as the tension of the spring becomes-great enough, the arm 44 is quickly snapped from the position illustrated in Fig. 5 to that which it occupies in Fig. 8. The pneumatic motor now begins to run in the reverse direction and the large gear wheel 3| begins to turn slowly in the counter-clockwise direction. However before the gear wheel has travelled back very far, the supply of air to the motor is shut off and the turning movement of the gear wheel and the blowin element ceases. At this time, as heretofore stated, air is admitted into the front end of the cylinder so that the ment are pushed back into their idle positions. These latter steps are carried out in part by a simple valve device which may be operated by suitable stops on the gear wheel 3|.

In the arrangement shown, each of the stop pins 40 and 4| is carried upon a wedge-shaped on the front side of the gear wheel 3|, while the corresponding pin projects through the gear wheel and from the opposite or rear face thereof. Slideably arranged in and projecting through the front wall of the housing II, above the blowing element, is a bar 52 which is made noncircular in cross section or is otherwise formed or equipped to permit lengthwise sliding movements while held against turmng movements. This bar is so positioned that whenever one of the pins is reaching a predetermined limit of its movements, the cam-shaped piece 5| thereon is exerting a wedging or camming action against the end of the bar 52 and is forcing the latter forward. ,In otherwords it. takes a combination of movements-to operate. the bar 52, namely the sliding ing to atmosphere I 65 leads from the recess or movement of the housing into its forward position and, thereafter, the turning movement of the gear wheel. The bar 52 has an arm 54 fixed to the forward end thereof and extending laterally at right angles thereto. This arm has on the front side thereof, nearits free end, a forwardlyprojecting, adjustable stud 55 which, when pressed forwardly, engages a head 56 on the rear end of a stem 51 extending into a little valve casing 58 and carrying on its forward end, within this valve casing, a disk valve 59. A spring 60, surrounding the valve stem on the outside of the casing and bearing against the forward face of the head 56, normally holds this valve against a seat 6| surrounding the entrance to a pocket or recess 62 opening out of the rear end of the main chamber in'the valve casing. Air is normally admitted into the main chamber in the valve casing 58 through a pipe 54, and a pipe auxiliary chamber 62. When the valve 59 is closed, no air can flow from the pipe 64 into the pipe 65. However, just at the time when the reversing valve for the motor is being shifted, the valve 59 is unseated and thereupon air may flow from thepipe 64 into the pipe 65 and thus, as it will appear, cause the rear end of the cylinder l5 and the motor to be vented to atmosphere while air is admitted into the front end of the cylinder so as to force the piston rearwardly or to the right, as viewed in Fig. 4.

and forth and for operating the motor is con-,

trolled from a suitable remote station through the operation of a simple ontrolling member.

As shown in Fig. l, there is a suitable board or panel 65 within convenient reach of an operator. An air pipe 51 containing a manual shut off valve 68, a strainer 59 and a lubricator Ill extends behind the board or panel. On the rear side of thepanel is fastened a casting I2 containing a cylindrical bore 13 within which is disposed a rotary valve 14 in thin fiat piece extending lengthwise of the bore and diametrically across the same. There are four ports spaced ninety degrees apart from each other and connected to the bore 13, these ports being indicated, respectively, at 15, l6, l1 and 18. The air supply pipe 51 is connected to the port 15. The port 11, which is diametrically opposite the port I5, througha passage 19. Connected to the port 16 is a pipe extending up blower unit and, as shown in Fig. 3, opens into the rear end of the cylinder i5 through a port 8| in the rear cylinder head. The pipe 64 is a branch of the pipe 84 so that, when the'valve I4 is in a position to connect together the ports l5 and", as Fig. 10, air is delivered both to the rear end of the cylinder l5 and into the main chamber of the valve casing 58. By turning the valve 14 through an angle of ninety degrees in the counter-clockwise direction, communication between the pipe 40 and the air supply pipe is shut off and the pipe 80 is vented to atmosphere through port 11 and passage 19. Connected to the port I4 is a the forward end of the cylinder I5. when the valve I4 is in the position to admit air from the supply pipe to the pipe 40, the pipe 83 is ventthepassage l9. v

The valve 14 may conveniently be operated by a hand lever 84 fixed to the same and protruding from the front of the panel. The inner end the form of a relatively is connected to atmosphere past the head of the.

pipe 83 which leads up to through the ports 18, I1 and tion and being fastened to the panel. The ten-.

sion of the spring is least when the handle is in its down position and increases as the handle is.

swung up to the position it'occupies in Fig. 10, namely, the position which sets the blower unit in operation. Near the disk'ismounted a dog 91 pivoted at the middle and having aradial finger 88 that extends into the path of a lug 89 on one side of the disk. A spring 90 tends constant- 1y to hold oneend of the dog against a stop 9|,

namely in such a position that the lug 89 will strike the under side of the finger 98 when the handle is raised and thus raise the finger until the lug passes the same. travels beyond the end of the finger, the latter snaps back behind the lug and prevents the handle from swinging down until the finger is lifted out of the way.

The stop 9| is at the end of a pin or screw extending through a thick piston 93 slidable in a suitable bore in the upper part of the casting 12. The stop 9| is'exposed at one end of said bore while the other end of the latter is closed by a plug 94 into which the pipe 65 is screwed. Consequently, when the valve 59 is unseated, as

heretofore explained, air passes from pipes 80 and 64 through valve casing 59 and into pipe 65. Therebythe piston 93 at the controlling panel is forced back and shifts the dog 81 until the finger thereon rises clear of the lug on the disk 85, whereupon the spring 86 comes into play and throws the handle 84 down and turns the valve 14 through an angle of ninety degrees from the position indicated in Fig. 10. Only after the valve 14 has thus been shifted is the supply of air to the pneumatic motor for turning the blowing element shut oil; thus permitting the blowing element to move far enough in the reverse direction, after the reversing valve has been operated, to carry the then active cam clear of the bar 52, and allowing the valve 59 to close. The system is now ready for a repetition of the cycle when the controlling handle is again raised.

vAlthough pressure is maintained in the front end of the cylinder l4, after a cycle of operations has been completed, until the hand valve 61 is closed no harm is done if that valve is left open.

'The entire control system, both for the cleaning fluid and for the power devices or motors, is illustrated diagrammatically in Fig. 12. The operation has heretofore been fully described; but, for a fuller understanding, it may further be noted that while in Figs. 1 and 2 the blowing element and parts reciprocable therewith are shown fully retractedand in Figs.- 3 and 4 as being fully extended, Fig. 8illustrates the conditions existing at the instant that; a turning movement in one direction of the blowing element has been completed and the reversing valve' has been operatedn At this time the valve 59, is still open and'it remains so until the. motor has run long enough -in the'reverse .direction to carry the cam 5| away from the bar 52.

It should perhaps be noted thatthe arm .44 on thereversing valve is limited in its swinging movementsbytwostops 95 and 96 fixed to and projecting rearwardly from-the stationary plate 49. The 'sprlngsnaps the arm 44 from one of As soon as the lug" these steps to the other at the end of each angular stroke of the gear wheel 3|. Also, in order that the gear wheel cannot turn too far in either direction, stops are preferablyprovided to limit the angular movement of the segment 49 whose finger 5|) then servesjas a stop for the gear wheel. so that the stopping action' of' the gear wheel may be a yielding'one, the segment 49 is provided with a hairpin spring 91 the closed end of which partiallysurr'ounds the pivot pin 98. The arms of the spring" lie between and press against a pair of pins 99 projecting from the front face of the segmentyand they also play between widely spaced pins I 90 and I0! fixed to the plate 48.. hen one of the arms of the spring strikes either thepin I00 or the'pin "II, the segment 49 need not stop abruptly but may continue its movement while that arm is bei pressed back toward the other arm. This isof advantage in case the snap actiondevice becomes sluggish and needs an extra push to make it invention, we do not desire to be limited tov the exact structural details thus illustrated and described; but intend to cover all .forms and arrangements which come within the definitions of our invention constituting the appended claims.

1.-A soot blowing element mounted for turning movements and also for lengthwisemovements between a working position and an idle position, a motor to move the said element lengthwise, a second motor to turn said element an automatic reversing device for. said second motor, a controller having a.movable member vin one position of which the first motor is caused to move said element into itsv working position and in a second position of which that motor is caused to returnsaid element to its idle position and said second motor is caused to stop, and

-means controlled by said element while in its working position to cause said member to assume its said second position after said element has turned through a predetermined angle.

2. A tubular soot blowing element mounted for turning movements, and also. for lengthwise movements betweenva working position and an idle position, a.v pneumatic motor to move said element lengthwise, a second pneumatic motor to turn said element, means controlled by the first motor to energize the said second motor when said element occupies its working position, and means controlled by the said element for energizing the first motor to cause it to drive said element into its idle position after saidelement has made a predetermined angular movement while in its working position.

3. The combination with a hollow head, of a tubularblowing element'mounted in said head for turning movements and also for lengthwise movements between aw'orkin'g position and an idle position, guide rodsextending from one side of said head parallel tosaid element, a housing slidable alongs'aid'rods, one end ,of said element 1 beingso connected to thehousing as to be re ried by the housing, speed reducing. gearing, in

the housing connecting the motor and the said said handle in its second position against the reelement together. and means to admit cleaning fluid from the head to said element.

4. The combination with a hollow head, of a tubular blowing element mounted in said head for turning movements. and also for lengthwise movements between a working position and an idle position, guide rods extending from one side of said head parallel to said element, a housing slidable along said rods, one end of said element being so connected to the housing as to be rotatable therein and be held against lengthwise movement relatively thereto, a power device connecting said head and said housing to move the latter from and toward the head, a motor carried by the housing, speed reducing gearing in the housing connecting the motor and the said element together, an automatically closing valve in said head to control-the admission of cleaning tluid to said element, and a part on said housing to engage with said valve when the housing comes near the head and open the valve.

5. The combination with a hollow head, of a tubular blowing element mounted in said head for turning movements and also for lengthwise movements between a working position and an idle position, guide rods extending from one side of said head parallel to said element, a housing slidable along said rods, one end of said element being so connected to the housing as to be rotatable therein and be held against lengthwise movementrelatively thereto, a cylinder fixed to the head with its axis parallel to that of said element, a piston in said cylinder, a piston rod extending from said piston and connected to said housing, a motor carried by said housing, speed reducing gearing in the housing connecting the motor to the blowing element, a two-position valve to control the admission of fluid under pressure into one or the other end of the cylinder, a handle for moving said valve into one of its positions, and means to cause said valve to shift into its other position after said element has turned through a predetermined angle while the housing is nearest the head.

6. A soot blowing element mounted for turning movements and also for lengthwise movements between a working position and an idle position, a motor to move the said element lengthwise, a controller having a handle in one position of which the first motor is caused to move said element into its working position and in a second position of which that motor is caused to return said element to its idle position, a spring adapted to move said handle into the first of said positions, a catch adapted to hold sistance of the spring, and means controlled by said element to trip the catch after said element has made a predetermined angular movement while in its working position.

7; A tubular soot blowing element mounted for turning movements and also for lengthwise movements between a working position and an idle position, a pneumatic motor to move said element lengthwise, a second pneumatic motor to turn said element, means controlled by the first motor, and including a reversing valve, to energize the said second motor when said element occupies its working position, and means 'gizing the first motor to cause controlled by said element for shifting its reversing valve and for energizing the first motor to cause itto drive said element into its idle position after said element has made a predetermined turning movement while in its working position. a

. 8. In combination,

said element, and means controlled by the lengthwise position of said element to start the motor to begin a cleaning operation and stop the motor at the end of the cleaning operation.

9. A tubular soot blowing element mounted for turning movements and also for movements between a working position and-an idle position, a pneumatic motor to move said element from eachof said positions to the other, a second pneumatic motor to turn said element, means controlled by the first motor, and including a reversing valve, to energize the said second motor when said element occupies its working position; and means controlled by said element for shifting the reversing valve upon completion of a predetermined turning movement while said element is in its working position, for then deenergizing the second motor, and finally enerit to drive said element into its idle position.

DE LOS E. HIBNER.

FRED C. AREY.

a support, a soot blowing element mounted in said support for lengthwise-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441112 *Jun 9, 1944May 4, 1948Vulcan Soot Blower CorpRetractable soot blower
US2456690 *Nov 4, 1944Dec 21, 1948United Shoe Machinery CorpFluid-pressure-operated mechanism
US2504073 *Apr 22, 1947Apr 11, 1950Vulcan Soot Blower CorpPower-driven soot blower
US2610029 *Sep 9, 1950Sep 9, 1952Jeffrey Mfg CoDrill feed mechanism with recipro-cating nonrotating feed cylinder
US2657595 *Aug 17, 1949Nov 3, 1953Keller Tool CoPressure fluid operated tool with pressure fluid control feed
US2699566 *Mar 7, 1949Jan 18, 1955by m_esne assignmentsde los e
US2722032 *May 20, 1949Nov 1, 1955Diamond Power SpecialityControl means for movable soot blower heads
US3000036 *Aug 12, 1959Sep 19, 1961Tidewater Oil CompanyCleaning tool
US3089468 *Aug 29, 1960May 14, 1963John Thompson Australia Pty LtSootblower
US4354294 *Sep 10, 1980Oct 19, 1982White Consolidated Industries, Inc.Rotary wall deslagger
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/317, 91/170.00R, 173/18
International ClassificationF28G3/00, F28G3/16
Cooperative ClassificationF28G3/166
European ClassificationF28G3/16D