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Publication numberUS2320048 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1943
Filing dateNov 27, 1940
Priority dateNov 27, 1940
Publication numberUS 2320048 A, US 2320048A, US-A-2320048, US2320048 A, US2320048A
InventorsRex Parson Leo
Original AssigneeRex Parson Leo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crankcase servicing device
US 2320048 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.. R. PARsoN CRANKGASE SERVICINQ DEVICE May 25, 1943.

Filed Nov. 27, 1940 INVENTOR LEU EEK FHE'SUN Patented May 25, 1943 UNITED STATE s PATENT 'OFFICE i cnANxoAsE sEavrclNe DEVICE Leo Rex' Parson, Oskaloosa, Iowa Application November 27,1940, serial No. 367,316

(ci. 11n-1.5)

4 Claims.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a method of and means for supplying or withdrawing uid from a crankcase or like that will permit the rapid withdrawal of oil from the v crankcase of a motor, the analysis of the oil so withdrawn, the refilling of the crankcase with fresh oil of a selected grade or the replacing of the oil withdrawn for analysis back into the crankcase of the motor.

A further object of this invention is to provide a method of and means for supplying or withdrawing uid from a crankcase or like which has a positive method of forcibly removing the oil from the crankcase, an examination chamber for the oil so removed, a selective dispenser for measuring and dispensing oil from sealed transparent containers, and a means for introducing flushing fluid into the crankcase and withdrawing it therefrom.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an oil reflll pipev to be attached to the crankcase of an automotive vehicle which will permit the attachment of the dispensing means thereto without necessitating entrance to the crankcase from underneath the vehicle or motor.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a method of and means for supplying or' withdrawing uid from a crankcase or like, which will permit the changing or withdrawing of oil from the crankcase of an automotive vehicle without danger of spilling the oil over the various parts f the motor, and which will accomplish the result rapidly and cleanly, while at the same time assuring the purchaser of an accurate amount of oil of the lspecified grade and visual inspection of the same.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a method of and means for supplying or withdrawing fluid from a crankcas'e or like that is economical in manufacture, durable and efflcient in use. y

These and other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

My inyention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of the device, .whereby the objects contemplatedare attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, pointed out in my claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

ller pipe of the vehicle.

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatical view of my complete method of and means for supplying or withdrawing fluid from a crankcase or like ready for use. Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the nozzle cap showing the method of quickly securing the dispensing and-withdrawing means to the Fig. 3- is an enlarged side elevationalview of the upper open end of the ller cap more fully illustrating its structure.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged cross sectional view oi the crankcase plug and the oil refill tube showing its method of attachment to the crankcase of a vehicle.

Fig.' 5 is an enlarged top sectional view of the crankcaseplug element and is taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged side sectional view of `a portion of the dispensing tube showing the flushing tube suspended therein.

"Heretofore, it has been necessary to drain the oil from a crankcase of a motor, more specifically from automotive vehicles such as trucks, cars or the like, from the bottom of the crankcase. This necessitated raising the vehicle, going below the car and removing a drain plug, permitting the oil to run into a bucket or other container. The' plug was then placed back into the crankcase drain, and if the device was to be flushed with a flushing oil, the whole process had to be repeatd. The oil was then measured in a container and introduced into the filler pipe for filling the crankcase. 'I'his is a messy and tedious job and ties up the use of the vehicle for a considerable length of time. Furthermore, the purchaser has no means of knowing whether or not the oil so withdrawn had lost its body, and in order to protect himself in obtaining the proper oil,l has been forced to pay more because of the sealed containers which premiumoil companies have been forced to use to insure against substitution of.

cheaper grades of oil. I have overcome all of such disadvantages as will be hereinafter more fully set forth. l

Referring to the drawing, I have used thc numeral l0 to designate an internal combustion motor or the like having thereon the usual crankcase Il and crankcase ventilator l2. As is well known, these crankcases have a draining opening in their lower side for draining the oil therefrom, anfd this opening is internally threaded. I halve used the numeral I3 to designate a hollow plug member having the radially extending holes I4 therein and a bottom angc member I5. The numeral I6 indicates an elongated flller pipe having on its lower portion acollector ring l1 with an inside channel groove i8 i portion. of the plug I3 so that the holes I4 are in communication with -the collector channel or groove I8. The plug I3 is then placed in the threaded portion of the crankcase opening with gaskets I9 and 20 placed between -the plug and the crankcase and between the flange I5 and rings I1 as shown in Fig. 4 of the drawing. This pipe I6 then extends'upwardly beside the motor I0, is secured thereto and terminates in a flange top 2| having the bayonet slot openings 22 therein. The numeral 23 indicates a filler pipe cap which may be placed over the open end of the pipe I6 and secured thereto by having the ordinary bayonet pins therein and in the usual manner.

It will be noted that I have provided a hole I5 extending through the ange portion I5 of the plug I3. Through this hole may be introduced a wire which may then be fastened about the pipe I6, as shown in Fig. 1, thereby preventing the accidental displacement of the plug I3 from the crankcase. Such a wire I have designated by 4the numeral 24. I

It is in combination with such a motor and iiller pipe that I use my method of and means for supplying and withdrawing uid from a crankcase or like which I will now describe.

The numerals 25, 26, 21 and 28 indicate oil reservoirs made of transparent material or having a transparent opening therein for containing vvarious types of oils such as grades and weights. Each of these containers have alock ing top portion 25', 26', 21' and 26' respectively, which may be locked through the medium of a padlock 29 by the bulk oil service man 0r the like. I have used the numerals 30, 3|, 32- and 33 to indicate dispensing pipes each having one of their ends in communication with the inside of the containers 25, 26, 21, and 28 respectively and having their other ends in communication with a manually operated distributing valve 34. The-numeral 35 indicates a light bulb placed below each of the containers and extending up into them for the purpose of illuminating the oil within the container and atthe same time warming the oil to be dispensed.. These lamps are in communication with a suitable source of electricalenergy through the medium of the wires 35'. v

The numeral 36 indicates a visual inspection chamber construction of a transparent material such as glass, plastic or the like and having the hydrometer housings 31 and 38 in communication therewith and parallel thereto. In each of these housings 31 and 38 I have provided a hydrometer bulb 39 and 40 respectively for measuring the specific gravity of the oil within the visual inspection chamber 36 and measuringthe amount of impurities such as Water, gasoline. or sediment therein. The numeral 4I indicates a. puznp cylinder in communication with the upper end of the chamber 36 and having thereinv the ordinary plunger 42 and rod 43. This pump may be any type of pump and may be remotely situated from the chamber 36. It may also be manually driven or mechanically driven, but I have shown a simple type plunger pump for purposes of illustration. The lower end of the chamber 36 is tapered and is in communication with a shut-01T valve 44. The numeral 45 indicates a variable distributing valve having one of its sides in communication with the valve 44, one of its other two sides in communication with a. pipe 46 leading to a suitable waste container,I

and its other side in communication with a pipe material and having its upper end in communication with the meter 48 and its lower end in communication with a valve 50 as shown in the drawing. The valve 50 is an ordinary two-way valve manually operated to' be used for either closing the lower end of the chamber 49 or the end of the pipe 41. The numeral 5I indicates a conduit in communication with the valve Il and to which is secured .one end of an elongated ilexib'le hose 52. -The other end of the hose 52 has thereon a coupling'member 53. This coupling member 53 has formed therein a.' tube I4, which can be introduced into the inside ofthe pipe I6. The coupling 53 is fitted with bayonet prongs so that it may be securely fastened 'to the top of the pipe I6 through the medium of the ilange 2| and bayonet slots 22. This coupling 53 is then fitted with a swivel mounting 55, which in turn is secured to the hose 52. Imposed in the hose 52 is a box element or coupling 53l having an inlet lpipe 51 leading thereinto, which has its inner end in communication with a ilex- 4ible hollow tube member 53 which extends through the tube 52 and to a point within the tube 54 of the coupling 53. The-other end of the inlet pipe 51 is secured to a valve 56, which in turn is in communication with a pipe 60, which is in communication with a source of supply of a flushing fluid to be used for ushing the crankcase II and then withdrawn therefrom.

The practical operation af my device is as follows: f

When it is desired to remove the oll from a crankcase the customer drives his car into a lling station or likethe ,cap 23 is removed from the top of the tube I6. and the`coupling 53 secured over the end of the pipe as shown and described. The valves 44, 45 and 50 are then manually operated and the pump 4| actuated, thereby drawing the oil forcibly from the crankcase II up and into the visual chamber 36. The valve 44 is then closed, thereby retaining the oil Within the chamber 36 for inspection. The hydrometer bulbs 36 and 40 will measure the various densities or specic gravities of the oil and foreign material within the oil and suitable lights may be placed back of the chamber 36 so that the` customer may view the oil so removed from the crankcase. Graduated markings may be placed upon the chamber 36, and thus at a glance, the customer can tell the amount of foreign material in the oil, the richness of its body, its color, and Whether-or not the oil or conduit 41. The numeral 48 indicates a me-.15

supply that was in his crankcase is low. After determining this, the valve 44 may be opened and the valve45` adjustedso that theoil, if judged poor, can be discharged through the waste pipe 46 or may be put back into the crankcase II through the pipe 41 and its attendant conduits. The necessary amount ofoilmay then be added to this by setting the meter 48, selecting the gradevof oil on the valve 34 and permitting it to issue into the tank 49 from which it may be -dispensed into the crankcase by operat- Y ing the valve 5I). However, should it be decided that the oil should be changed, the old oil is allowed to flow out of the chamber 36 through thevalves 44 and 45, and through the waste pipe 46 to a separate container. 'Ihe valve 6I is then manipulated closing the lower end of the chamber 49, the dial of the selector valve 34 set for the proper grade lof oil, which is allowed to pass through the meter 48 into Vthe chamber 49 for the inspection of the customer. The valve member 50 is then operated to close the end of the pipe 41 and permit the measured amount of the oilto pass from the chamber49 through the pipe I, hose-52, coupling 53, pipe I6 and thence through the holes I4 into the crankcase Il of the motor. Should' it be desired to flush the crankcase before placing the new oil therein, the flushing fluid is Permitted to enter through the pipe 60, valve 59, the pipe 5l into the tube 58, where it will pass into the crankcase II. I The motor is then run to assure the cleaning of theA crankcase and oi'. system, and the valve 5 9'is closed and the ushing fluid is removed by the same process accomplished in the removal of the old oil. all that is necessary is to operate. the pump 4I, secure the coupling to the top of the pipe I6, set the valves, and remove or dispense oil in a very short period of time. -In practical operation, these valves may be ganged to further ease the manipulation of the device.

When it is desired to clean the device, it is merely necessary to drop the coupling 53 into a method of and means' for supplying and dispensing fluid from a vcrankcase or like which fulfills all of my objects, that is rapid in its operation,

ldoes not require a separate oiling pit or hydraulic hoist, that is clean, and which comprises all of the necessary features for permitting the with,- drawing. of oil from a crankcase, the addition of oil, or the refilling of oil as well as the flushing of both the device and the motor at the same time. My device can be made in an attractive form and permits the customer to see what the performance of his oil has been, and tov also see the oil which he is being furnished. The whole operation of changing the oil can be accomplished while the customer is having gasoline placed in the car and takes considerable less time and labor for performing this service than has heretofore been possible. y'

The bulk station man lls the containers 25, 26, 21 and 28 with oil and locks them, which is common practice, thereby preventing the substitution of a cheapergrade of oil for the one ordered by the customer. All of the gauges are transparent -for the customersV inspection, and by using this device, the motor of the car will not become coated with oil as has heretofore been the case. The pressure created within the crankcase of the car is relieved throughthe 'standard crankcase ventilators I2 which are in common use on internal combustion motors, and it is never necessary to get under the c'ar to remove the drain plug,

thereby preventing the accidental loss of o il due to the improper retting of the drain plug in the vehicle, as is a common occurrence. My device also results in a saving toI the customer, inasmuch dealer.

. The coupling 53 may have incorporated therein a shut-off valve for stopping the flow of oil at that point, and a number of methods may be used,

. used for other types of fluid dispensing means.

By this method Some changes may be made on the construction and arrangement of my improved method of and means for supplying and withdrawing fluid from a crankcase or like without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my intention to cover by my claims any modied forms of structure or use of mechanical equivalentsfwhich may be reasonably included within their scope. I claim:

1. In a means for supplying or vwithdrawing fluid from a crankcase or like, a plurality of fluid containers, a distributing valve having its inlet in communication with each of said fluid containers, n a meter having its inlet in communication with the outlet of said distributing valve,` a visual measuring and storage container having its upper end in communication with said meter, a threeway valve having one of its inlets in communication with the lower end of said visual measuring and storage container, a hose having one end in communication with said three-way valve and its other' end designed to be detachably secured to and in communication with a crankcase or like, a visual inspection chamber, a pump in communication with said inspection chamber, a variable distributing valve in communication with the lower end of said visual inspection chamber and having one of its sides in communication with said three-way valve and its other side in Jcommunication with a waste pipe, a means for visually gauging the sediment of said oil in said inspection chamber, a flushing tube inside said hose between the measuringv and storage container and the crankcase, and a valve for controlling the ilow'of a flushing fluid into 'said flushing tube at times.

2. In a means yfor supplying or `withdrawing fluid from a crankcase or like, a plurality of containers, a variable distributing .valve incommu- `nication with each of said containers, a meter, a measuring means in communication with said meter, a three-way valve inv communication with said measuring chamber, a dispensing tube having one end in communication with said threeway valve, a means for detachably securing the other end of said dispensing tube to and in communication with a'crankcase, a visual inspection chamber, a pump mechanism in operative comtion chamber,` a second distributing valve in communication with the other end of said visual in- 1 spection chamber, a pipe in communication between said second mentioned valve and said threeway valve, and a waste pipe in communication with the other side of said second mentioned valve. y x' 3. In a means for supplying or withdrawing a fluid from a crankcase or the like, a visual inspection chamber, avpump in communication with the upper end of the said visual inspection chamber, a three-Way valve in communication with the lower end of said inspection chamber, a waste outlet in communication with said valve, a hose atl tached to said valve having its other end in deinspection chamber, va' three-way valveinterposed in said hose between the visual inspection chamber valve and the crankcase, a visual measuring and storage container in communication with said valve, a meter at the upper en'd thereof, a distributing valve in communication with said meter, a plurality of storage chambers, said storage chambers being in communication with said distributing valve, and an inletconduit having a valve therein, said inlet conduit being interposed between the measuring container valve and the crankcase for the introduction of cleaning iluid.

4. In a system of the class described, a manifold removablyconnected to the crankcase of an internal combustion motor, means for withdrawing oil through the manifold for visual inspection thereof, means for selectively returning the oil to the crankcase or discharging it from the system.

2,320,048 l' -means for introducing liushing oil inw the fold and for delivering it to the crankcase, a plurality of means for storing fresh oil, selective valve means for selecting charges of oil'from the storage means, metering means associated with the selective means for metering oil supplied from the storage tanks, a visual measuring storage tank for receiving oil from the meter, and valve means for permitting fresh oil to flow from the visual measuring storage tank-into the manifold and motor crankcase, the system thus formed being adapted to withdraw old oil from the crankcase of the motor vehicle, permit inspectionfol' the old oil .and selectively discharge or return it,

admit ilushing oil .to the crankcase and withdraw and discharge it, and supply a 'measured supply `of new fresh oil to the crankcase.

LEO REX PARSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2755969 *Sep 24, 1953Jul 24, 1956Compressori Universal StazioniApparatus for checking and replacing oil in engine sumps
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Classifications
U.S. Classification184/1.5, 222/113, 315/183, 222/144.5, 134/168.00R, 222/145.2, 134/113
International ClassificationF01M11/04, F16N37/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01M11/0458, F16N37/00
European ClassificationF16N37/00, F01M11/04D