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Publication numberUS2320050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1943
Filing dateJan 14, 1941
Priority dateJan 14, 1941
Publication numberUS 2320050 A, US 2320050A, US-A-2320050, US2320050 A, US2320050A
InventorsPeterson Walker F
Original AssigneePeterson Walker F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deflector ring
US 2320050 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1943. w. F. PETERSON 2,320,050

DEFLECTOR RING Filed Jan. 14, 1941 i'fcbta 19 MrFPeZgzvo/a as W Patented May 25, 1943 N TE STATES PATENT QF ICE 2,320,050 nE L o'roR RING WalkerEF. Peterson, Baltimore, Md. Application January 14, 1941, serial No. 374,398

6 Claims. c1.,137' '111 pendent upon-the dimensions of tliestructure itself, and secondarily upon the assembly alignment of the cooperating members, such as the inner conical member .and the conical bore in the valve body. ;The commerciallystandard dimensions for making and mounting associated parts, andithe consideration of external appearance, restrict the space allowance for such devices whilethe demands ofeconomical commercial manufacture determine the accuracy which can be maintained. These-factors'flstablish a limit as to the rate of quiet -flow which can be guaranteed for each of a number of such valves, although it risjfound in practice that greater rates of quiet flow can be employed with specially selected valves from suchagroup, or can be obtainedat a greater expense by observing closer tolerances in manufacture and assembly.

,It has been found that, for a given size of body, and for given operating conditions and tolerances of dimensions and assembly of parts, the rate of quiet flow can be materially increased by employinga discharge chamber construction including a member which primarilyacts upon eddy currents in the chamber asdistinguished from exercising a direct action upon the main flow stream from said cooperating -memb ers. Conversely, greater tolerances of dimensions and alignment of parts are permissible for a given rate of ,flowfwhen such a construction semployed.

An object of the present invention, therefore, is to provide astructure in' which a greater rate of flow, without objectionable noise can be seure wit wa e I iz bf e a w determined degree of accuracy in the construction and assembly of parts. 1

An ill s rat ve' e Q a t n t ui tion in association with other members of the regulating stop valve assembly is ,showno ini accompanying-drawing, in which: V s I "Figure; ,l is a coaxial sectional view through the Va'reg at st pta ve semb Figure 2 is a corresponding view of the valve body structure alone.

Figure 3 is .a sectional view substantially on line3-'3ofFig.2.

In the drawing, the illustrated valve has a body ID with water supply'connection It and the annular flange 12'. Downstreamward of this flange, -the interior of the-body isprovided with an enlarged bore 13 which preferably has the illustrated form of a truncated divergent cone having an apex angle of about 22 degrees the internal surface being formed with V-shaped ribs and 'grooves spaced forty to the inch. Beyond this bore is a collector chamber M. -A discharge connection I5 is provided with external threads I6 to receive the clamping nut I! which presses the beveled end of the outlet tube i8 into the correspondingly shaped orifice of the discharge connection -for providing a water-tight fitting.

chamber l4 extends as apassage 9 which leads The to'the outlet tube I8, the walls of the passage standardized dimensions of the structure are such that a part of the containing structure for the bore .1 3 is provided by a bridge wall 2%) formed as apart of the body. v V

The adjusting and closing structure comprises a-cap 25 which isthreaded into the valve body and is apertured to receive the rotatablesleeve 26 having acollar 21 located in a cavity of the cap and secured therein by a split ring 28.- A

sealing gasket 29-surrounds the sleeve 26 and is held in position; by the gland nut 36. This sleeve 26 is threaded internally to receive the threaded-stem 31 of thefrusto-conicalretarding member 32 which has thesame apex angle as the bore I3 and has a similarly ribbed external surface. This-member 32* carries a guide pin 36 which is slidable in a pocket 35 of the cone 32 and serves to prevent rotation of the member 7 32 when the sleeve 26 is turned, whilepermitting According to-the present invention, the collector chamber -I l is provided with-anew controlling means which is illustrated as being a deflector ring 40 of larger internal diameter than the projection of the conical internal surface of bore l3, so that the sheet of water proceeding from the annular passageway between this bore [3 and the member 32 does not directly impact against it. It is preferably located nearer to the upstreamward end 38 of the collection chamber than to its downstreamward end 39. In the illustrated form, the deflector ring extends as a flange for 180 degrees about the chamber at the blind side or portion diametrically opposite the discharge connection IE, but may extend for a much greater or somewhat lesser peripheral distance. It is essential, for its functioning, that it extend continuously from the common plane through the axes of the discharge passage l5 and of the bore I3 for a distance of at least 40 degrees at the blind side denoted by bracket B on Fig. 3. In practice, it has been found that little advantage is gained by making the deflector ring longer than 180 degrees, i. e. 90 degrees from said common plane.

The character of the surfaces of the bore l3 and the member 32 may be varied as set out in the aforesaid patents.

The deflector ring may be either smooth, as by machining, or may be of the rough sand finish obtained in the usual casting for valves of this class.

A screw-driver can be engaged with the kerfed outer end of sleeve 26 as a tool for rotating the same and thereby moving the member 32 relative to the valve body. The annular spacin or clearance between these parts can thus be adjusted to secure the desired rate of flow for the prevailing mains pressure. With the present arrangement, very high rates can be obtained without causing noise to develop at normal pressures as employed for city water supplies. Forinstance, a rate of flow of 35 gallons per minute without objectionable noise can be obtained by soldering a deflector ring into the collector chamber of a valve assembly through which a similarly quiet flow of only 25 gallons per minute was previously possible under the same conditions of manufacturing tolerances and alignment of parts.

The axial thickness and the radial dimension of the deflector ring may be considerably varied, but it is preferred to have the axial thickness as small as commercially practicable for manufacture. The radial width of the deflector ring must be such that the inner part of this ring is substantially outside the path of the high velocity annular sheet; or, considered structurally, the deflector ring or flange is located external to the extension of the conical surface of the bore l3.

In studies of the behavior of water currents in such devices, it appears that a function of the deflector ring is to limit or control the water so as to change the character and direction of the eddy or back-flow currents from the high Velocity discharge stream formed by the annular sheet, to render such currents of a character and amount that they do not operate to cause noise by interference with each other or with the main fiow streams, to the end that the water in all parts of the collector chamber can quletly pass to the discharge connection.

As' an example of commercial practice, the overall height of a valve body as shown in Figs. 2 and 3 was 2%; inches; the interfitting threads in the cap 25 and body had a length of inch; the depth of the chamber I4 between surfaces '38 and 39 was ,-2- inch; the cap threads were 1.75

inches outside diameter; the bore had a cylindrical portion inch in axial length for ease in machining, with a downstreamward divergent conical portion having a large diameter of 1.426 inches with a length of /1 inch and an apex angle of 22 degrees; the distance from the body axis to the face of the outlet connection was 1&3- inches. The minimum radius of the collector chamber M was inch, so that the radial distance from the large diameter of the bore 13 to the peripheral wall of the collection chamber (Fig. 2) was approximately A, inch. For this structure, the deflector ring was formed in the original casting, without machining of its surfaces, and extended 180 degrees as shown in Fig. 3, and had a thickness at its base of inch (a proper draft being provided at each side for casting), a height or radial width of A; inch, with rounded corners: it was spaced inch from surface 38 and inch from surface 39. A number of such devices all operated successfully with city water at pressures up to pounds per square inch, and at flow rates of 32 gallons per minute or above.

It will be understood that the invention is not restricted to the particular form of employment show-n, but that it may be modified in many ways within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A quiet flow retarding device for liquids comprising means for providing a collector chamber having a' discharge connection and means for delivering a sheet of liquid across said chamber, and a flow controlling deflector means located in said chamber with a portion thereof diametrically opposite the discharge connection and extending toward but terminating short of the path of said sheet of liquid, said chamber including passages at both sides of said deflector means and extending in directions at acute angles to the path of said sheet and along which the liquid may flow directly into the discharge connection.

2. A quiet flow retarding device for liquids comprising a body having a bore, an enlarged collector chamber downstreamward of said bore, and a lateral discharge connection; an internal member in said .bore and cooperating therewith to restrict the flow of water to a thin annular sheet which is discharged into said collector chamber; and a deflector flange located on the wall of said collector chamber with a portion of the flange located diametrically opposite the discharge connection and other portions extending around the sheet toward the discharge connection substantially in a plane at acute angles to the direction of the sheet, said flange extending toward but terminating short of the path of said sheet of liquid.

3. A quiet flow retarding device for liquids comprising a body having a bore, an enlarged collector chamber downstreamward of said bore and having a restricted length in the axial direction of the bore, and a lateral discharge passage'from said chamber: an internal member in said bore and cooperating therewith to restrict the flow of water to a thin annular sheet which is discharged at high velocity into said collector chamber; means for closing the bore and having its inner surface spaced from. the internal 1118111.. her; and flow controlling deflector means fixedly located within the chamber with a portion thereof located diametrically opposite the discharge passage external of but closely adjacent to the path of said high velocity sheet and extending around the sheet substantially in the direction of a plane at right angles to the axis of the bore for a distance at the blind side of at least 40 degrees from each side of the common plane through the axes of the discharge passage and of the bore.

4. A quiet flow retarding device for liquids comprising a body having a bore, an enlarged collector chamber downstreamward of said bore and having a restricted length in the axial direction of the bore, and a lateral discharge passage from said chamber: an internal member in said bore and cooperating therewith to restrict the flow of water to a thin annular sheet which is discharged at high velocity into said collector chamber; means for closing the bore and having its inner surface spaced from the internal member; and flow controlling deflector means comprising a flange fixedly located within the chamber with a portion thereof diametrically opposite the discharge passage and external of but closely adjacent to the path of said high velocity sheet and extending substantially in the direction of a plane at right angles to the axis of the bore for a distance at the blind side of at least 40 degrees from each side of the common plane through the axes of the discharge connection chamber, said discharge passage being located at an angle to the direction of said sheet, an arcuate deflector flange located on the wall of said chamber opposite to the discharge passage and in a plane at right angles to the axis of the sheet, said deflector flange extending inwardly toward but terminating short of the path of said sheet of liquid and having a part located diametrically opposite the discharge passage and other parts extending along the chamber wall toward the discharge passage, said chamber including passages both upstreamward and downstreamward of said deflector flange and leading directly to the discharge passage in directions at right angles to the path of said sheet.

6. A quiet flow retarding device for liquids comprising a body having an inlet at one end and an enlarged collector chamber downstreamward of said inlet opening, a closing wall for said chamber at the opposite end of said body, a discharge passage leading laterally from said chamber, means at said inlet for delivering an annular sheet of liquid across said chamber toward said closing wall, and an arcuate deflector flange extending from the chamber wall toward but terminating short of the path of said sheet of liquid, said flange being located opposite the discharge passage and extending substantially in the direction of a plane at right angles to the axis of the sheet for distances of to degrees at each side of the common plane through the axis of said sheet and the axis of said discharge passage, said chamber including passages both upstreamward and downstreamward of said flange along which the liquid may flow directly toward the discharge passage.

WALKER F. PETERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2616445 *Nov 28, 1945Nov 4, 1952Gaddoni LouisGasoline economizer
US3253676 *May 28, 1964May 31, 1966Edward W BottumAdjustable muffler
US4624415 *Apr 1, 1985Nov 25, 1986American Standard Inc.Control assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/802, 138/40
International ClassificationF16K47/00, F16K47/16
Cooperative ClassificationF16K47/16
European ClassificationF16K47/16