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Publication numberUS2320657 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1943
Filing dateAug 6, 1941
Priority dateAug 6, 1941
Publication numberUS 2320657 A, US 2320657A, US-A-2320657, US2320657 A, US2320657A
InventorsOscar C Roesen
Original AssigneeWood Newspaper Mach Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Web roll splicing method and apparatus
US 2320657 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1, '1943. o; c'. RO ESEN I WEB ROLL SPLIOING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed Aug. 6, 1941 L2 Sheets-Sheet l 6, a nun u m u t l l hl h P 1 I L 1 1| HH 7 R m m u v w a mm W M W 00 5 W 4 r 5 w. M 0, 2. .3 L J w M a I, ME W 9 w/ 4 ill! .IIII:

i S ATTORNEYS June 1, 1943. o. ROESEN 2,320,657

WEB ROLL SPLICING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed Aug. e, 1941 2 Sheets-Shee t 2 w @HZ J0 J9 J8 J2 INVENTOR 05607 C Foesen.

S ATTORNEYS Patented June 1, 1943 WEB ROL L SPLICING METHOD AND APPARATUS Oscar C. Roesen, Scarsdale, N. Y., assignor to Machinery Corporation, Piainiield, N. J., a corporation of Virginia Application August 6, 1941, Serial No. 405,630

14 Claims. "(L 242-58) Wood Newspaper This invention relates to the replacement of webs fed to printing presses and other web-consuming apparatus. It particularly concerns the operation of splicing the leading end of the web on a new or replacement 'roll to the web running Car to epress or other apparatus from a roll that v is nearly depleted.

The paper web fed to a printing press is sup- I plied in large rolls which must be replaced during the press operation and without stopping the press or reducing its speed. Since the running web travels at a very high speed, it is essential that prior to splicing the new roll be accelerated until its cylindrical surface attains or approximates the velocity of the running web to which it is spliced. Because of the high web speed and the inherent weakness of the web, the splicing operation is quite critical and has in the past been a source of frequent breakage of the web with consequent reduction in the output of the press.

This application is a continuation in part of my copending application Serial No. 403,514, filed July 22, 1941, now abandoned.

The present invention contemplates an improved method of and apparatus for splicing a web from a new roll to a rapidly moving web from an expiring roll. More particularly the improved method involves accelerating the new roll by direct contact between its surface and.

the running web while preventing contact between the running web and the tacky adhesive at the leading end of the new web by means of protective shields carried on the new roll, and thereafter removing the shields to permit the splicing contact when the new roll has been accelerated to the desired speed.

The invention will be described in detail in connection with an embodiment thereof involving the replacement of rolls of paper web fed to a printing press, but it should be. understood that the invention is not limited to such application but is useful in any operation involving Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic sectional view of the.

web roll, showing one arrangement of parts for both shielding the leading web end adhesive and securing the leading end to the rollsurface;

' the shield partly removed;

Fig. 3 is'a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 showing a modified arrangement of the leadin web end adhesive shield;

Fig. 41s a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 showing modified means for decreasing adhesion between the web end and the shield;

Fig. 5 is a planview of a ribbed shield as shown in Fig.4 with the adhesive-bearing area of the web point indicated;

Fig, 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6-6. of Fig. 4 and viewed in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic side elevation of a r web roll reel and tension belts for use in practicing the invention, the parts being in the the reel in the position it occupies while the new roll is being accelerated to running web speed: -Fig. 9 is an enlarged sectional view of the web roll surface and the shield removal roller with Figs. 10 and 11 are respectively similar elevations showing the new or replacement roll and the running web just before and just after the splice is made;

with one or more areas carrying a tacky paste or adhesive such as the rosin glue known in this art,'and this glue is covered by one or more removable shields. Referring particularly to Figs. 1 to 4, the leading end i i of the web is shown cut or torn to present a plurality of points I:

as is customary, and the outer surface of the web end at each point is coated with a layer of tacky adhesive l3 which may comprise rosin glue or an equivalent tacky and strong adhesive. These adhesive-bearing. point areas are best shown in Figs. 2 to 4.

The leadingend of the web is removably secured to the roll surface by any suitable known means. gummed tabs I4 are used for this purpose, but a weak adhesive or grease. sticking the leading ends of the points i2 to the surface of the next course of the web on the roll, may be substituted in accordance with known practice. The opposite end of the tabs l4- illustrated are respectively stuck to the outer surfaces of the leading ends of-the points i 2 and to the surface In the disclosed embodiment, frangible of the nextcourse f-of web on the roll; and a weakened portion such .as a line of perforations l separates the tab ends sothat they tear along this line and release the points and the leading end of the web when it is spliced to a running web and pulled away from the roll- Frangible tabs of this type are describedin detail in Wood Patent No, 1,996,497. a A removable adhesive shield I6 is secured to the roll surface over each layer of tacky adhesive is,

- These shields-may be formed of ordinary paper or of moisture-resistance paper, cloth or other 'material that will resist penetration by the'tacky adhesive l3 and thus present a non-tacky outer I surface. The rearwardend of each shield I8 is removably secured to the leading end ofthe web rearwardly of the-adhesive l3 on the point (2 by suitable means such as a weak adhesive or grease indicated at H, and the forward ends of the shields may be similarly removably secured to the web roll surface Just in advance of the ends'of the points l2, as indicated at l8 in Figs.

3 and 4. Instead of the weak adhesive securement I8, the forward edges of the shields l6 may beremovably, attached to the roll surface by frangible tabs'lS as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. ,The

tabs l9 may be similar to or identical with the tabs ll used to secure the web end points l2 to the roll as explained above.

The outer surface of each shield I6 is provided with a layer ofspecial adhesive 20 at or closely adjacent .to its' leading edge. This layer adheres directly to the shield where, as illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4, the shield-is removably secured to the roll surface by weak adhesive. When frangible tabs l9 are used for this purpose-the special adhesive layer adheres to the outer sur-' face of the rearward end of each tab and may either arrangement, the special adhesive is secured directly, or indirectly to the of the leading end of-the web.

The special adhesive 20 used, which will be hereinafter referred to as a self-sticking adhesive, is applied to the web or to the web and tab end in fluid form and tenaciously adheres thereto, and thereafter the exposed surface of the applied layer can be rapidly dried'to a point. where such surface will not adhere to an uncoated web surface pressed against it, but adhere tenaciously to a similar dried exposed adhesivesurface. Thus the self-sticking adhesive is one which adheres to the web when applied, and'when dried its surface coheres to a like or similar adhesive surface.

-but does not adhere to an uncoated web surface.

An adhesive suitable for the purpose described may comprise any one of anumber of known non-vulcanizing rubber cements. In general, tl-ese cements comprise raw unvulcanized rubber, usually subjected to a small amount of hot milling, dissolved in a suitable solvent. Solvents employed in such cements-include gasoline, benzene, ethylene dichloride, carbon tetrachloride,-

outer surfacecommercial rubber cement suitable for the described purpose is available on the market under the trade name "Best-Test White Rubber Paper Cement" and is made by the Union Rubber and Asbestos Company of Trenton, New Jersey. Although the above described rubber cements are suitable self-sticking adhesives, it should be understood that the use of similar adhesives having this self-sticking property is not precluded.

In order to remove the shields l6 and expose thetacky adhesive I3, a-shield removal roller 2|,

lying parallel to the roll 32,'is provided. This roller 2| is preferably of considerably smaller extend laterally onto the adjacent surface of the I shield if the tab is narrower than the shield.. Suchan arrangement of the adhesive layer on the tab is shown at 20' in Figs. ,1 and 2. 1 In illustrated in Figs. 4-, 5 and 6. Theribs 48 may tarnish makefls and painters naphtha, and a I distillate having an initial boiling point of from about'lZO? to 180 F. and an end point of from about 250 to .288" F.- The amount of rubber in suchcements runs up to 8% or 10%, and known solvent diluents such as isopropanol, ethanol, butanol, amyl acetate, 'butyl'acetate, acetone, or methyl 'ethyl ketone are sometimes added. A

special rubber solvent comprising a petroleum diameter than the roll 32 and is suitably mounted to rotate about its axis and to move substantial] parallel to its axis toward and away from thecyiindrical roll surface. The roller-2| may be, rotatably carried between arms 22 engaging a shaft 23 parallel to the axes of the roller 2| and roll 32, as shown in Figs. 1, 7 and 8. The roller 2| may be driven from thepress or other web-consuming apparatus by any suitable means and preferably through a clutch, the drive being arranged to propel the roller at such speed that its surface velocity is the same as or closely apto an uncoated web surface. The self-sticking adhesive layers 2| are alined with the web point shields It, as shown in Fig. 1.

In order to insure that the shields ll will be readily removable from the leading end points |2 of the web despite the presence of the layer I! of tacky adhesive between these parts, it may be necessary or desirable to provide means for producing less adhesion between the tacky adhesive l3 and the shields it than that between this adhesive and the web. This may be accomplished by coating the under surface of each shield IS- with a layer of wax, or similar adhesive-repellent material, orbyinterposin'g a layer of waxed paper or. the like between the shield and the tacky adhesive. Both of these expedients have been illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3- where 41 represents the adhesive repellent. The adhesive repellent 41 preferably terminates short of the edges ofthe shields ,where they are secured to the web by the weak adhesive i1 and I8. As .an alternative to theadhesive repellent 4'1, each shield may be provided with. ribs 48 on the under surface thereof which act to hold such surface of the shield out of contact with the tacky adhesivelayer II as be corrugations or protrusions formed integral withthe shields or mayv comprise a series of' threads, cords or other elongated elements, preferably secured to the shields. They may terminate short of the shield ends as illustrated in Fig. 4, or may be co-extensive therewith as shown at 48 in Fig. 5. when the ribs 48 or 68' are used, the tacky adhesive may be applied to the web endpoints il in spaced transverse strips as indicated at I3, in Fig. 5. This reducesthearea of contact between the ribs and the adhesive far below that between the adhesive and the web,

and so positively insures that the shield may be removed without lifting the web points from the roll surface.

The. operation of splicing a web in accordance with the invention has been illustrated in Figs. 7 through 12. In these figures I have illustrated a conventional three-roll reel at 24. As shown in Fig. '7. the reel 24, which turns about a central axis 25, carries three spindles 28, 21 and 28. The spindle 26 is shown carrying a roll 29, from which the running web 3|) passes over an idler roller 3| and to the press or other web-consuming equipment, not shown. New rolls 32 and 33 are shown mounted respectively on the spindles 21 and 28. The rolls 32 and 33 here illustrated have been prepared for splicing as described in detail above.

A set of tension belts 34 extends parallel to the roll surfaces around the idler rollers 35, 36, 31, 38, 39 and 40, and a weighted or otherwise biased idler 4| maintains these belts at the desired tension. Separate weighted idlers may be used for the different belts 34 if desired. The belts 34 are preferably driven at a speed substantially equal to that of the running web 30 by suitable means such as a shaft 42 connected to the press or other web-consuming apparatus. The belts 34 are preferably of the narrow type, spaced apart transversely of the web as shown in Fig. 12, and brushes 43 of known construction, supported by suitable means to swing about the pivot 44 and arranged to engage the web 30 between the belts 34 opposite the new roll 32, are preferably provided.

When it becomes necessary to replace the web running from an expiring roll such as 29 with that from a new roll, the reel 24 is first rotated clockwise from the position shown in Fig. 7 to that of Fig. 8, where the cylindrical surface of the new roll 32 engages the surface of the runa,3ao,o57

This may be readily accomplished by watching the roll 32, the leading web end ll of which may be marked by a "flag" or side tab 45 (Figs. 1 and '7), and dropping the roller 2| Just as the marker passes the uppermost position.

After the roller 2| is lowered,,it rotates on the surface of the new roll until the self-sticking adhesive layers 2| thereon respectively engage the similar layers 20 or 20 on the outer leading surfaces of the shields l6. This contact produces tenacious coherence between the two selfsticking adhesive layers, and, as a result, the shields iii are stripped from the surface of the roll 32 and wound around the roller 2| (see Fig. 9), the tabs [9 and weak adhesive parting from the roll surface. The tacky adhesive areas l3 on the web end points |2 are thus exposed, as indicated in Fig. 10. As the roll 32 continues to turn, the tacky end areas It come in contact with the running web and the splice is made. The running web 30 pulls the new web end away from the new roll 32, breaking the tabs i4 or equivalent web end holding means, and the web from the new roll runs to the press. Immediately after the splice is thus made, the web from the old roll may be severed by suitable known means such as a knife 46 as shown in Fig. 11.

The new roll 32 then becomes the running roll,

7 and the reel 24 may be further rotated clockwise ning web 30 and presses this web between the roll. surface and the belts 24. The rapidly moving web 30 quickly accelerates the new roll 32 to a speed such that its surface velocity equals or approximates the velocity of the running web 30. During this roll acceleration, the layers 20 or 20' of self-sticking adhesive on the shields it repeatedly contact the running web, but since, as described above, this adhesive is dried to a point at which it does not adhere to uncoated web surfaces, neither the acceleration of the new roll, the normal running of the web 30 or the position of the shields it are in any way altered. The shield removal roller 2| is held up out of contact with the cylindrical surface of the new roll 32 during the acceleration thereof, and during the web roll acceleration period, the roller 2| may be accelerated to the same surface ve- .applicable to a two-roll reel, a roll stand or any other roll-carrying mechanism capable of bringing a new roll close to a web running from an expiring roll.

The method of the invention effectively splices the web from a new roll to the running web without any reduction in web speed and without the use of any special roll accelerating means. This avoids the necessity of correlating the diameter of each new roll to the web speed and adjusting a locity as that of the new roll, though this is not essential.

After the new roll 32 has attained the proper speed, and While its cylindrical surface continues to rotate in contact with the running web 30 or during the acceleration period, the brushes 43 are lowered to apply pressure to the running web and thus press it firmly against the new roll surface. As illustrated in Fig.12, the belts 34 engage the web between the end points l2 and so do not press against the adhesive shields I6. When the expiring roll 29 has been so far depleted that the splice should be made, the operator lowers the .shield removal roller 2| into contact with the surface of the new roll 32. The roller 2| preferably contacts the new roll surface at such a time that it does not immediately engage the shields i6.

spindle drive accelerating mechanism accordingly, and eliminates the use of speed-up belts movable into engagement with each new roll in turn.

In the above described embodiment of the invention, the tacky adhesive areas and their protective shields have been described as applied directly to the end of a continuous web wound into a conventional roll. This manner of preparing the roll is generally preferable, but the invention in its broader aspects 1 is not limited thereto. Thus the leading end of each new web roll may comprise a web section previously prepared and spliced thereto by the press room operators when each new roll is placed on the reel or other rollcarrying mounting.

I claim:

1. In a method of splicing the leading end of a web on a new web roll to a web running from an expiring roll, the steps of applying a layer of tacky adhesive to the outer surface of the web on the new roll substantially at its leading end, removably securing a flexible shield over such tacky adhesive layer, applying tothe outer surface of said shield a layer of self-sti king adhesive, drying the exposed surface of said self-sticking adhesive layer to a point where it will not adhere to an uncoated web but will adhere to a similar self-sticking adhesive layer surface, contacting the cylindrical surface of the new roll'with the surface of the running web whereby the newroll is accelerated to a surface velocity substantially equaling the velocity of the running web, and" pressing against the rotating cylindrical surface of the new roll a continuous movable surface carrying a layerof self-sticking adhesive dried sufliciently to avoid adherence to the-uncoated web but capable of tenaciously adhering to the a tacky adhesive to the outer surface ofthe web curing the leading end of the web. on the new roll to the new roll surface, applying a layer of on the ,new roll substantially at its leading end, removably securing a flexible shield substantially impervious to said tacky adhesive over such layer, applying to the outer surface of said shield adjacent its leadingend a layer of self-sticking adhesive, drying the exposed surface of said selfadhesive layer on said shield whereby said shield adheres to said surface and is removed from said new roll thereby and said tacky adhesive layer is exposed for splicing contact with the running web'.

2. In-a method of splicing the leading end of a cylindricalsurface of the new roll with the surface of the running web whereby the new roll-is accelerated to a surface velocity substantially equaling the velocity of the running web, and pressing against t'.. e rotating cylindrical surface of the new roll at a point spaced fromthe running web a rotatable cylindrical-surface carrying a layer of self-sticking adhesive dried sufficiently to avoid adherence to the uncoated web but capable of tenaciously adhering to the adhesive layer on said shield whereby said shield adheres to said surface and is removed from said new roll thereby and said tacky adhesive layer is exposed for splicing contact with the running web.

3. In a method of splicing the leading end of a web on a new web roll to a web running from an expiring web roll, the steps of removably securing the leading end of the web on the new roll to the new roll surface, applying a layer of tacky adhesive to the outer surface of the web on the new roll substantially at its leading end, removably securing a flexible shield substantially impervious to said tacky adhesive over such layer, applying to the outer surface of said it will not adhere to an uncoated web but will adhere to a similar self-sticking adhesive layer surface, contacting the cylindrical surface of the new roll with the surface of the running web whereby the new roll is accelerated to a surface velocity substantially equaling the velocity of the running web, and pressing against the rotating cylindrical surface of the new roll at a point spaced from the running web the cylindrical surface of a rotatable roller carrying a layer of selfsticking adhesive dried sufllciently to avoid adhesion to the uncoated web but capable of tenaciously adhering to the adhesive layer on said shield, whereby said shield adheres to said roller surface and is removed from the new roll thereby and said tacky adhesive layer is exposed fo splicing contact with the running web.

4. In a method of splicing the leading end of a web on a new webroll to a web running from an expiring web roll, the steps of removably sesticking adhesive layer to a point where it willnot adhere to an uncoated web but will adhere to a similar self-sticking adhesive layer surface, contacting the cylindrical surface-of the new roll with the surface of the running web whereby the new roll is accelerated to a surface velocity substantially equaling the velocity of the running web, pressing against the rotating cylindrical surface of the new roll at a point spaced from the running web the cylindrical surface of a rotatable roller carrying a layer of self-sticking adhesive dried sufficiently to avoid adhesion to the uncoated web but capable of tenaciously adhering to the adhesive layer on said shield,

. whereby said shield adheres to said roller surface and is removed from the new roll thereby and said tacky adhesive layer is exposed for splicing contact with the rimning web, continuing the contact between said new roll surface and the running web until the leading end of said new roll web engages said running web and is spliced thereto, and severing the'web running from the expiring web roll.

5. A web roll arranged for making a high speed V splice comprising a substantially cylindrical roll wound from a continuous web having a leading outer end, a layer of tacky adhesive on the outer surface of said web adjacent its leading end, a flexible shield removably secured to said roll over said tacky adhesive layer, and a layer of self-sticking adhesive adhering to the outer surwound from a continuous web having a leading outer end, means for removably securing said leading end to the web roll surface, a layer of tacky adhesive on the outer surface of said web adjacent its leading end, a flexible shieldv of sheet material substantially impervious to said tacky adhesive removably secured to said roll over said tacky adhesive layer, means for preventing substantial adhesion between said tacky adhesive layer and said shield, and a layer of self-sticking adhesive adhering to the outer surface of said shield and having an exposed surface capable of tenaciously adhering to a similar adhesive layer surface but incapable of adhering to an uncoated web surface.

7. A web rollarranged for making a high speed splice comprising a substantially cylindrical roll wound from a continuous web having a leading "web roll adjacent its edges and beyond said tacky adhesive layer and a layer of self-sticking adhesive adhering'to the outer surface of said shield and having an exposed surface capable of tens ciously adhering to a similar adhesive layer surface but incapable of adhering to an uncoated web surface.

a 8. A web roll arranged for making a high speed splice comprising a substantially cylindrical roll wound from a continuous web having a leading outer end with at least oneforwardiy extending point thereon, a layer of tacky adhesive on the outer surface of said web point adjacent its leading edge, a flexible shield removably secured to said roll over said tacky adhesive layer, means for preventing substantial adhesion between said tacky adhesive layer and said shield, and a layer of self-sticking adhesive adhering to the outer surface of said shield and having an exposed surface capable of tenaciously adhering to a similar adhesive layer surface but incapable of adhering to an uncoated web surface.

9. A web roll arranged for making a high speed splice comprising a substantially cylindrical roll wound from a continuous web having a leading outer end with a plurality of forwardly extending points thereon, separable means secured to said roll and said points for removably securing the leading end of the web to the web roll surface,

a'layer of tacky adhesive on the outer surface of said web roll points adjacent their leading edges. a flexible shield substantially impervious to said taclw adhesive removably secured to said roll over each of said tacky adhesive layers, and a layer of self-sticking adhesive adhering to the outer surface of each of said shields and having an exposed surface capable of tenaciously adhering to a similar adhesive layer surface but incapable of adhering to an uncoated web surface.

10. A leading web end for a web roll arranged for making a high speed splice comprising a layer of tacky adhesive on the outer surface of the web end, means for removably securing the web end to' the roll surface, a shield removably secured 'over said tacky adhesive layer, and a layer of adhesive on the exposed outer surface of said shield adjacent the leading end thereof.

11. A leading web end for a web roll arranged for making a high speed splice comprising a layer of tacky adhesive on the outer surface of the web end, means for removably securing the web and to the roll surface, a shield removably secured over said tackyadhesive layer, a layer of adhesive repellent between said shield and said tacky adhesive layer, and a layer of adhesive on the outer surface of said shield adjacent the leading end thereof.

12. A leading web end for a web roll arranged for making a high speed splice comprising a layer of tacky adhesive on the outer surface of the web end, a shield of flexible sheet material substantially impervious to said tacky adhesive removably secured over said tacky adhesive layer, and a layer of self-sticking adhesive adhering to the outer surface of said shield adiacent its leading edge and having an exposed surface capable of tenaciously adhering to a similar adhesive layer surface but incapable of adhering to an uncoated web surface.

13. In a method of splicing the leading and of a web on a new web roll to a web running from an expiring web roll, the steps of applying a tacky adhesive to the outer surface of the leading end of the web on the new roll, covering said tacky adhesive with a removable shield, accelerating the new web roll by contact with the running web,

and applying a roller to the surface of the new web roll to strip the shield therefrom.

14. In a method of splicing the leading .end of a web on a new web roll to a web running from an expiring web roll, the steps of applying a tacky adhesive to the outer surface of the leading end of the web on the new roll, covering said tacky adhesive with a removable shield carrying a selfsticking adhesive on its outer surface, accelerating the new web roll by contact with the running web and applying a roller coated with a self-stick-' ing adhesive to the surface of the new web roll to strip the shield therefrom;

OSCAR C. ROESEN.

Pa'tenfi 30. 2,520,657.

qmmcm'n- 0E comcuon. 4

e June 1, 191; boom c. ROESEN.

it is hereby certified error eppeara in the printed specification of the above rmmbered. patent requiring-correction es follows: Page 1, second column, line 55, for "end' -read end"a--; page 2, first colmnn, line 55, after the word 'but' 'ineert -'-'w111--;and that the aid Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record 0! the casein the Betentofflce.

Signed and aealedrthia 6th day otJuly, 1\. D. 1%.5.

V Henry Von. Ar'adale (Seal) Acting Commisoioher of Paizenta.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2596189 *Aug 19, 1946May 13, 1952Hoe & Co RMethod for replacing web rolls in printing machines
US3257085 *Dec 11, 1962Jun 21, 1966Riegger Paul CharlesRoll-changing and web-splicing machine for web rolls of material
US4097323 *Jun 2, 1976Jun 27, 1978Agfa-Gevaert N.V.Butt-splicer
US4129265 *Apr 14, 1978Dec 12, 1978Westvaco CorporationReeled web unwind stand
US4290834 *Jun 2, 1980Sep 22, 1981Buettel Paul MWeb splicing method
US6899933Oct 21, 2002May 31, 2005PermacelSplicing tape with separating portions
US7037397Jan 21, 2005May 2, 2006PermacelSplicing tape with separating portions
US7476429May 11, 2004Jan 13, 2009PermacelBridge label for splicing tape
US20040045658 *Oct 21, 2002Mar 11, 2004PermacelSplicing tape with separating portions
US20050095385 *May 11, 2004May 5, 2005Permacel And Nitto Denko CorporationBridge label for splicing tape
US20050126688 *Jan 21, 2005Jun 16, 2005ParmacelSplicing tape with separating portions
CN100396586CJul 24, 2003Jun 25, 2008普玛司公司;日东电工株式会社Splicing tape with separating portions
DE10309045A1 *Mar 1, 2003Sep 9, 2004Voith Paper Patent GmbhConnector for web tongues to core uses connecting areas offset in travel sense and connector tip stiffened or thickened to ensure join.
WO2004022468A1 *Jul 24, 2003Mar 18, 2004PermacelSplicing tape with separating portions
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/555.5, 156/157, 242/556.1
International ClassificationB65H19/10, B65H19/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2301/46075, B65H19/102, B65H19/181, B65H19/105
European ClassificationB65H19/10B, B65H19/10A, B65H19/18B2