Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2321824 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1943
Filing dateApr 3, 1942
Priority dateApr 3, 1942
Publication numberUS 2321824 A, US 2321824A, US-A-2321824, US2321824 A, US2321824A
InventorsClark Knight
Original AssigneeClark Knight
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Can holder
US 2321824 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1943. c. KNIGHT 2,321,824

CAN HOLDER Filed April 3, 1942 3 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 June 15, 1943.

C. KNIGHT CAN HOLDER Filed April 3, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IL q l4 6 f 1 n mu ,5 f

CLARK KNIGHT 5. M an-W Patented June 15, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CAN HOLDER Clark Knight, Houston, Tex.

Application April 3, 1942, Serial No. 437,604

' '3 Claims. (c1. 24s 154')' This invention relates to a can holder.

An object of the invention is to provide a holder, either of the portable or stationary type, particularly designed for securely anchoring in place cans or containers such as trash or garbage cans and whereby the can may be readily released when it is desired to handle the can.

Another object of the invention is to provide a holder of the character described which will readily receive and securely hold cans of different sizes.

It is another object of the invention to provide a holder of the character described that may be readily anchored in place.

With the above and other objects in view the invention has particular relation to certain novel I features of construction, arrangement of parts and use, an example of which is given in this specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 shows a plan view.

Figure 2 shows a longitudinal, sectional view.

Figure 3 shows a cross-sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 shows an elevational view of one type of anchor employed.

Figure 5 shows a vertical, sectional view of another type of anchor employed shown in active position.

Figure 6 shows a vertical, sectional view thereof in inactive position.

Figure 7 shows a cross-sectional View taken on the line 'I-I of Figure 5.

Figure 8 shows a side elevation of the stationary type of holder, and

Figure 9 shows a bottom plan view thereof.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings wherein like numerals of reference designate the same parts in each of the figures, the numeral I designates a transverse angle bar having the end webs 2, 2 and the depending end bosses 3, 3 which are internally threaded. The numerals 4, 4 designate the side bars which are secured at one end to the transverse anchor bar I, in any preferred manner, as by welding, and whose other, or forward ends merge or unite and are formed with a vertical opening 5.

Secured to the forward side of the transverse bar I and depending therefrom is a bearing 6 and secured to the forward ends of the side bars 4 and depending therefrom there is a bearing 1. Mounted to rotate in these bearings there is an outwardly threaded shaft 8.

There is a bracket formed of the upstanding side arms 9, 9, which are spaced apart, and the internally threaded nut IIl through which the shaft 8 is threaded.

There is a central bar II anchored at its rear end to the bearing member 6 and at its forward end it is united to the side bars 4, said central bar II being located-between the side arms 9, 9.

Secured to the upper ends of the side arms 9, 9 there is an arcuate clamp member I2 shaped to approximately conform to the contour of and to fit around the can I3.

Upstanding from the cross-bar I are the standards I4, I4, one on each side, and secured, at their respective ends, to these standards, and spaced apart one above the other, are the rearwardly bowed upper and lower straps I5, I6.

The can to be clamped in position may be located on the cross-bar I and the side bars 4 between the clamp I2 and the straps I5, I6, as indicated in dotted lines in Figure 1, and in full lines in- Figure 8. The shaft 8 is extended rearwill be moved forwardly to release the can and when turned in the other direction the clamp I2 will be moved rearwardly to clamp the can between it and the straps I5, I6 as shown in Figure 8.

It will be noted from an inspection of Figures 1 and 9 that the side bars 4 are of sinuous shape so as to form a support for either a small can or for cans of larger, cross-sectional diameter as illustrated by the dotted lines in Figure 1.

If a portable type of holder is desired the carrier wheels I8, I8 will be employed and mounted on spindles I9, I9 whose outer ends are formed with heads and whose inner ends are screwed into the webs 2 at the ends of the cross-bar I as shown in Figure 1.

The portable type of holder also has an approximately U-shaped push bar as 20, the free ends of whose side bars extend approximately vertically alongside the standards I4. Hookshaped clamps 2|, 2| engage around these free ends with their shanks extended forwardly through the standards I4 andoutwardly threaded to receive the nuts 22, 22 as shown in Figures 1 and 2. At the upper ends of the standards the side bars are bent rearwardly so as to give the push bar 20 the desired angle of inclination.

The bearing 1 has a depending boss 23 which is internally threaded to receive the upper externally threaded end of the leg 24 provided to support the forward end of the framework.

It may be desired to anchor the portable type of can holder at a fixed location. For this purpose an anchor as shown in Figures 2 and 4 has been provided which consists of the spaced anchor bars 25, 25 securely imbedded in the earth with the anchor rod 26 pivoted between their upper ends and provided with a stop 2'! beneath its upper end. When not in use this anchor rod may be laid over on the ground surface out of the way but when in use it may be moved to vertical position and inserted through the eye and a key 28 inserted through the opening 29 in the anchor rod immediately above the eye 5. This key is attached to the framework by means of the flexible tie member 30.

In Figures 5 and 6 another type of anchor is shown which comprises a cylinder 3! buried be-.

side slots 33 extending from the upper end thereof downwardly to a point near the lower end thereof. I

Vertically slidable through this bushing there is an anchor rod 33 having the lower end head 35 to prevent its detachment and having the crosspin 36 movable in the side slots 33. The upper end of the anchor rod 34 has a grip member 37 by means of which it may be elevated. When elevated and turned out of alignment with the slots 33 the cross-pin 33 will rest on the upper end of the bushing and hold the rod 34 elevated. When turned to align the cross-pin 36 with the side slots 33, the anchor rod 34 may move downwardly with its upper end flush with the ground surface out of the way. The holder may be attached to the anchor rod 3 2 in the same manner as it is attached to the anchor rod 26.

Is" it be desired to permanently anchor the can holder in a fixed position the spindles I9 and wheels l8 may be removed as well as the leg 24 and the upper ends of the anchor rods 38 may be screwed into the bosses 3 and 23 as illustrated in Figure 8 with said anchor rods 38 buried the required distance in the earth and with their lower ends 39 overturned so that they will not be liable to be displaced.

In other respects the form shown in Figures 8 and 9 is the same as shown in Figure 1.

The drawings and description are illustrative merely, while the broad principle of the invention will be defined by the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A can holder comprising a frame embodying a transverse bar, spaced standards upstanding from the bar, retaining means anchored to the standards and shaped to partly surround a can on the frame, a clamp opposite said retaining means adapted to clamp the can between it and the retaining means, an adjusting shaft mounted on the frame and operatively connected with the clamp whereby the latter may be adjusted into clamping or released position.

2. A can holder comprising a frame embodying a transverse bar, spaced standards upstanding from the bar, retaining means anchored to the standards and shaped to partly surround a can on the frame, a clamp opposite said retaining means adapted to clamp the can between it and the retaining means, an adjusting shaft mounted on the frame and operatively connected with the clamp whereby the latter may be adjusted into clamping or released position and means for anchoring the holder in fixed position.

3. A can holder comprising a frame embodying a transverse bar, spaced standards upstanding from the bar, retaining means anchored to the standards and shaped to partly surround a can on the frame, a clamp opposite said retaining means adapted to clamp the can between it and the retaining means, an adjusting shaft mounted on the frame and operatively connected with the clamp whereby the latter may be adjusted into clamping or released position, carriers on which the frame is mounted and means for anchoring the holder in fixed position.

CLARK KNIGHT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2439423 *Dec 21, 1942Apr 13, 1948Fowler Harlan DLocking and safety signal combination for cargo airplanes
US2576832 *Oct 9, 1947Nov 27, 1951American Cyanamid CoCylinder holder
US5131670 *Dec 28, 1990Jul 21, 1992Scubagear Inc.Detachable scuba tank overland transport device
US5385325 *Jul 6, 1993Jan 31, 1995Rigsby; Kenneth D.Adjustable container holder
US5445350 *Jun 30, 1994Aug 29, 1995Rigsby; Kenneth D.Adjustable container holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/154
International ClassificationB65F1/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65F1/141
European ClassificationB65F1/14C