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Publication numberUS2323287 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1943
Filing dateAug 14, 1939
Priority dateAug 14, 1939
Publication numberUS 2323287 A, US 2323287A, US-A-2323287, US2323287 A, US2323287A
InventorsAmberg Walter E
Original AssigneeUniversal Paper Products Compa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper cup
US 2323287 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. a MBERG July 6, 1943;

um cur f Findus. 14.. 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Patented July 6, 1943 Application All This invention relates to a new and improved receptacle suitable for holding water, soda, beverages and other liquids. It particularly relates --a 14, 1939, Serial N0. 290,107

provision of a flat folded or envelope cup in which the bottom of the cup. in its folded state,

to a new and improved type o f envelope cup or flat folded drinking cup and a method for the manufacture thereof.

As is well known, there are many types of drinking cups made from paper and similar materials. Among such`cups are cone shaped cups, at folded cups, and noni-collapsible at bottom cups. Cups which are capable of standing on their base or bottom when filled with liquid have a definite advantage over other types of cups which have to be held in the hand when in use. or which otherwise must be supported by a holder.

The so-called envelope cups or iiat folded cups in commercial use today all belong in that class of cups which are not self-sustaining, that is to say, when they have been lled with liquid, they will not stand on a table 'or the like but have to be held or supported in some way. Even when held in the hand, they tend to collapse, spilling the contents. It has previously been proposed to produce an envelope cup which is normally collapsed, but which may be opened, by hand pressure, to form a'flat bottom cup. It is with this general type of cup that the present invention is particularly concerned.

One of the dimculties in manufacturing a at folded cup which will open into a fiat bottom cup is that of opening the cup easily. This same trouble is more or less inherent in all envelope or fiat folded cups. Usually it is necessary to insert a finger into the mouth of the cup in order to open it, which is naturally undesirable -because it tends to contaminate the cup.

Another difficulty in the manufacture of flat folded cups which are convertible to at bottom cups is to be found in the tendency toward leakage, due to the manner in which such cups have heretofore been constructed.

Still a third difficulty with such cups is to be found in their inability to maintain a self-sustaining bottom. In other words, 4they tend to collapse again after they have been converted to a fiat bottom cup.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a new and improved type of envelope 'or flat folded cup which is convertible Vto a cup having a self-sustaining bottom. by slight hand pressure, and without the necessity for assisting the opening of the cup by placing the finger in the mouth thereof, or otherwise contaminating the cup. A feature of this invention which lends lies in a plurality of planes at angles to each other. Another feature of the invention which assists in the accomplishment of this object is the provision of a preferredvpredetermined arrangement of creases and fold lines in that portion ofthe cup which is to form the bottom.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved type of envelope paper cup which may be opened to form a cup having a. self-sustaining bottom, and when so opened, will remain open. A feature of the invention which contributes to the accomplishment of this object is the provision of a cup of the envelope type in which the dimensions and fold lines at the bottom of the cup are soarranged that hand pressure will cause the cup to open and simultaneously produce obliqueplanes in the bottom of the cup, forming obtuse angles with the side walls.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved cup of the type described in which several features of the cup coi operate to render it substantially leakproof. One of the features of the invention which assists in the accomplishment of this object is the provision of a predetermined arrangement of creases, fold lines, and glue lines in the bottom and side wall portions of the cup.

'I'he novel features and structure of said cup, together-with the advantages thereof, will be more fully ,understood from a. reading of the following specification, in conjunction with the accompanying drawings', in which:

Figure 1 represents an elevational view of a preferred form of cup provided in accordance with the invention;

Figure 2 represents the cup of -Figure 1 in partially collapsed condition as viewed from the bottom thereof;

Figure 3 represents a blank from which the cup shown in Figure 1 maybe formed;

Figure 4 represents a bottom view of the cup shown in Figure l, shown slightly smaller and expanded ready for use;

Figure 5 represents an elevational'view partly in section of the expanded cup shown in Figure 4, said sectional view being taken through the center line of said cup; A

Figure 6 is a sectional view of a portion of the cupillustrated in Figures 1'5;

Figure 7 isan elevational view of a modified formof cup;

Figrre 8 is a bottom view of the cup shown in Figure 7;

Figure 9 is a profileview of the cup shown in Figure 7;

Figure 10 is a cross-sectional view along the lines I8-I8 of Figure 7; and a Figures 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 illustrate different arrangements of creases and folds.

Referring to Figure 1, the drawing illustrates a side view of one formof cup provided in accordance with the invention. In this view the cup is shown in its flat folded form. Some of the edges and fold portions which are not visible are shown in dotted lines. Visible edges and fold portions are shown in solid lines.

As shown in Figure 1, the bottom of the cup in its fiat folded state lies in three planes, A. B`

and C, at oblique angles` to each other. Thus, planes A and B form obtuse angle a and planes B and C form obtuse angle b. This arrangement is an outstanding feature of the present invention because it makes possible the opening of the cup with ease and without contamination of the interior of the cup. Crease line c, intersecting the line of intersection of planes A and B, and crease line d, intersecting the line of intersection of planes B and C, also contribute to the ease o'f opening the cup and represent preferredembodiments of the invention. Itv will be understood that corresponding crease lines are placed on the opposite side of the cup.

A bottom view of the same cup in partially collapsed condition is illustrated in Figure 2. As shown in Figure 2, the cup has fold portions near the base thereof which extend centrally into the cup. When the cup is in collapsed condition all of these fold portions lie substantially in two planes. By exerting hand pressure laterally against the sides and bottom, the cup is expanded and these fold portions form a greater number of planes. When the cup is thus expanded, a flat base portion X is formed, as illustrated in Figure 4 and shown cross sectionally in elevation in Figure 5. At the same time, oblique planes Y and Z are formed in the base. With the formation of this base, Athe cup is no longer a flat folded cup but a cup which is selfsustaining either when empty or filled with liquid.

A blank from which a cup of the character described may be formed is illustrated in Figure 3. 'As shown, this blank is generally rectangular in shape and comprises opposite side edges 2 and 4 and upper and lower edges 6, 8 and I8, I2. The dotted lines shown in this blank are fold lines. Lines I4, I6, I6 and 28 are side wall fold lines to provide .for an overlap portion by which the sides may be secured together.

In the central portion of the blank is a fold line 22 which bisects the blank. On either side of fold lines 22 are parallel, .equally spaced fold lines 24 and 26. Perpendicular to fold lines 22, 2,4 and 26 are fold lines 28 and 88 which intersect fold line 22. Fold lines 28 and 88 are preferably equally spaced from the longitudinal axis of the blank running perpendicular to and bisecting edges 2 and 4.

28, respectively, when the blank is folded into cup form.

In forming the cup, fold line 22 is folded upwardly, fold lines 24 and 26,are folded downwardly and the edges 2 and 4 are brought up-i wardly toward each other. iThis leaves a folded triangular extension on each side of the blank formed by the coinciding of edges 52 and 54 on Athe one hand and edges 48 and 58 on the other.

Cil

On each side of fold lines 28 and 88 are fold These coinciding edges in each case form the hypotenuse of this triangular extension, one of the other sides being formed by fold line 22 in each case, and the third side of one triangle being formed by coinciding lines 48, 42 and of the other by coinciding lines 44, 46. These triangular portions are then folded inwardly around coinciding lines 48, 42 and 44, 46, respectively.` It is immaterial whether these triangular fold portions are folded along the plane formed between lines 22. and 24 or the plane formed by lines 22 and 26,

According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the blank shown in Figure 3 is also creased or folded along lines 28 and 38. A cross o section of crease 88, taken along line '22, is illustrated in Figure 6. As shown, the paper or other flexible material is so creased or folded that it is crushed or overlapped slightly at the intersection of lines 28 and 38 with fold line 22. This slight crushing effect or folding at these two points will insure the bottom of the cup A springing downwardly into pla'ce to form a selfsustaining base when the sides of the cup are subjected to lateral hand pressure. As the bottom springs down into place in the position shown in Figure 5, creases or fold lines are formed along lines 68, 62, E4 and 66. It will be apparent that lines 68 and 62 fall in the same plane and lines 68 and 64 fall in the same plane.

and that both planes are oblique to the bottomA 36 and 38on each side of line 88. It will be recognized that the method of providingvweakened points at the intersections of line 22 with lines 28 and 88 issubiect to variation and rany method for providing such weakened points falls A within the broader aspects of the present invention in its'preferred embodiments. It should also be understood that such weakened points are not absolutely necessary to the use of the cup.- `Since the cup may be opened-in the manner described as long as there are folds or creasesv along lines 28, 88, 88', 62, 64 and 66.

After folding the central portions of the blank as previously described, the-.overlap portions dened in part by edges and lfold lines 6, I 6 8, I4, I8, I8 and I2,28 are overlapped and secured together. AThese portions may be secured by'- adhesive or other suitable means. In bringing the overlap portions together, lines I4 and I6 will coincide and lines I8 and 28 will coincide. The adhesive maybe placed in such a manner that the parts are properly `ioined in'a manner well known to those skilled in the art. It will be apparent that in order to accomplish this, ad-

hesive may be placed upon the upper side of that portion of the blank which is to form the outside" overlap and on the lower side of that portion of the blank which is to form the inside overlap. Thus, in the nal cup, if fold line I6 is outside of fold line I4, the adhesive may be placed on the top Side 'of the area dened inv when the blank is folded. Thus, adhesive may be applied in that area of the blank dened by lines 24, 26, 52, 54, S4 and 66 and also in that area defined by lines 24, 23. 48, 50, 62 and 82. The adhesive may cover all or just a part of said area, it being understood, however, that adhesive is not applied to any-of those parts which might come in contact with water or any other liquid on the inside of the cup. Adhesive applied in the manner described serves to holdthe triangular overlap portions at opposite sides of the blank terminating in points 58 and 58 against the two planes of the inturned at folded cup dened by lines 22, 22 and 26. The adhesive applied in the areas just mentioned also serves to hold these areas against the side walls of the blank. It will be understood that the adhesive need not entirely cover the areas mentioned but may be applied in dots, lines or by other means well known in the art of making paper cups.

In the type of cup Just described, the side walls are aring, as shown in Figures 1, 2, 4 and 5. It will readily be recognized, however, that the cup may be made with substantially vertical side walls instead of converging .side walls by changing the position of the marginal overlap portions I4, I6, I8 and 2B so that they are parallel to the respective edges of the blank. Moreover, in the Cil type of cup just\ described, the formation of the e cup automatically forms pyramidal spaces at points S8 and 10, as illustrated by the bottom view in Figure 4. In other words, in the type of cup just described, lines 69 and 62 and 64 and St' y lie in planes which are oblique to the bottom portion of the cup. By changing the dimensions of the fold portions a cup may readily be formed in which the planes just mentioned substantially coincide with side walls of the cup when itis opened. This is accomplished by making the distance along line 24 between lines 28 and 42, plus the distance along line 2B between lines 28 and 40, equal to the length of line 28, and the distance along line 24 between lines 30 and 4d, plus the distance along line 26 between lines 30 and 46, equal to the length of line 32.

A type of cup formed in this manner is illustrated in Figures 7, 8, 9 and l0. This cup,as shown by the bottom view in Figure 8, does not have spaces at its base portion corresponding to spaces 68 and l0 of Figure 4. In other words, planes Y and Z substantially coincide with the side walls of the cup instead of being at an angle thereto. Otherwise, this cup is very similar in form and construction. It opens by hand pressure and has the same general appearance when folded in flat form as the cup shown in Figures 1 and 2, disregarding the configuration of the overlap portions. Thus, planes A, B and C are disposed at an angle to each other, as shown in Figure l, and thereby increas'e the ease of opening the cup. This cup may also have weakened lines or portions at the points 12 and 14,A or along lines I6 and 18.

It will be apparent that many other variations may be made in folding the blank without departing from the invention. For instance, if the glue joints are tight at the bottom of the cup, it is t not necessary that edges 42 and 46 touch the side walls of the cup I4 and 20 throughout, as shown-in Figure 5, although this is a preferred construction. Thus, if lines 40 and 42 lie in the same straight line, and lines 44 and 48 lie in the same straight line, edge 42 would be slightly separated from edge I4 at the top of the fold along line 22. The same would be true of edges 45 and 20, but the bulk of the fold in each case is a factor to be considered'and might be sum- .cient to ll up the space between said edges,

depending upon the particular method of folding.

It is important to note that when anoverlap fold, as shown in Figure 6 and as heretofore explained, is made in a bottom portion of the cup, the bottom edges along line 24 will not all lie in the same plane. Ordinarily, however, the slight up-turning 'of the edges will not be particularly noticeable.

The method of folding the blank in the central portion of the cup may be varied widely without departing from the invention. Thus, as previously described and illustrated, the blank shown in Figure 3 may be folded with points 56 and 58 lying along one of the planes D and E- formed by lines 22, 24 and 26, when the cup is in fiat form. Alternatively, in folding these triangular portions, the points 56 and 58 may be pressed downwardly so that they lie in the same vertical plane with line 22. This causes the formation of folds on each side of the planes D and E, and these folds are then made to lie against said planes, forming a cup which is symmetrical in every respect and in which the points 56 and 58 are not visible to the user, as is the case in Figure 5. This arrangement of creases and folds, which is particularly adapted to insure a leak-proof bottom, is shown in Figures l1, 12

cide with line B2 (Fig. 3) and line 44 to coincide with line 4t. Points 56 and 58 are then moved inwardly, forming four triangular fold portions, three of which are shown as e, f and g in Figures 11,12, 13, 14, 15 and 16. Side wall F is then partly lapped over plane E, as shown in Figure 13, and iinallyfside wall G is overlapped and secured by the adhesive area shown. A crosssection of the folds, taken along line I2-I2 of Figure 11, is shown in Figure 12, and a crosssection, taken along line Ill-I4 of Figure 13, is shown in Figure 14. Figure 15 illustrates a similar 1cross-section of the completed cup. Figure 16 illustrates in perspective a portion of the bottom and sides of a completed cup formed in the manner just described, with the planes X and Y corresponding to the same planes in Figure 5, an'l showing the position, with reference char-- acters e and g, of corresponding fold portions of Figures 11 to l5 inclusive. As previously stated, by arranging these fold portions in this manner, excellent protection against leaking is afforded.

As further variations, it is to be noted ythat the blank need not have triangular cut-away portions near the central part thereof, as illustrated in Figure 3, but Ymay be substantially a true rectangle with cut lines extending inwardly the distance of the overlap at opposite sides of the base of one or' both of the side walls. In folding the cup, thetriangular cut-away portions then become fold portions. Cups made in this manner have lcertain advantages in that leakage is practically impossible. On the other hand, they are slightly more difficult to form because of the'intricacies' of the folds. With the directions given, however, no one skilled in the art should have any difllculty making a cup of the type described. The use of rectangular blanks for forming cups ofthe 'character described has substantial advantages in that the blanks can be cut from a strip of paper without waste.

'I'he cups previously described have had a square or rectangular base. It will be apparent, however, that the base may have some other polygonal shape, as, for example, hexagonal or octagonal, being preferably a polygon with an equal number of sides. e

Having thus described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat-v ent of the United States is: I

1. A drinking cup of the envelope type adapted to retain a predetermined shape when Opened, said cup being formed from a blank of flexible sheet material, part of said blank forming side walls of `said cup bounded by longitudinally extending side wall creases, part of said blank forming the base of the cup being divided by fold lines into a plurality of rectangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side walls of the cup when said cup is in its normally collapsed condition and which open assaasv said oblique opening base planes each forming one side of an open bottomed pyramid when the cup is fully opened, the other sides of said pyramid being formed by the side walls of the cup, one of the base lines of said pyramid forming' Q to retain a predetermined shape when opened,

to form a substantially at bottom when pressure is exerted against said side wall creases,

part of the blank forming the base on each side of said flat bottom forming portion being divided into a plurality o'f triangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side walls of the cup when said cup isin its normally collapsed condition and which Open to form a part of the bottom which is oblique to the flat bottom portion and to the side walls, said oblique opening base planes each forming one side of an open bottomed pyramid when the cup is fullv opened. the other sides of said pyramid being formed by the side walls of the cup.`

2. drinking cup of the'envelope type adapted to retain a predetermined shape when opened, said cup being formed from a blank of flexible sheet material, part of said blank forming, side walls of said cup bounded by longitudinally extending side wall creases',v part of said blank forming the base ofthe cup being divided by fold lines into a plurality of rectangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side walls oi! the cup when said cup is in its normally collapsed condition and which open to form a substantially flat. bottom when pressure is exerted against said side wall creases, part of theblank forming the base on each side of said flat bottom forming portion being divided into a plurality of triangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side walls of the cup when saidcup is in its normally collapsed condition and which open to form a part of the bottom which is oblique to ,the flat bottom portion and to the side walls,

said cup being formed from a blank of flexible sheet material, part of said blank forming side walls of said cup bounded by longitudinally extending side wall creases, part of said blank forming the base of the cup being divided by fold lines into a plurality of rectangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side walls ofthe cup when said cup is in its normally collapsed condition and which open to form a substantially flat bottom when pressure is exerted against said side wall creases, part of the ,blank forming the base on each side of said flat bottom forming' portion being divided into a plurality of triangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side y thereto on both sides thereof.

4. A drinking cup of the envelope type adapted to retain a predetermined shape when opened,

said cup being formed from a blank of flexible sheet material, part of said blank forming side walls of said cup bounded by longitudinally extending side wall creases, part of said blank forming the base of the cup being divided by fold linesv into a plurality of rectangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side walls of the cup when said cup is in its normally collapsed condition and which open to form a substantially flat bottom when pressure is exerted against said side wall creases. part of the blank forming the base on each side of said at bottom, forming portion being divided into a plurality of triangular base planes extending substantially parallel with respect to the side walls ofthe cup when said cup is in its normally collapsed condition land *which open to form a part of the bottom which is obliqueto the fiat bottom portion and to the side walls, said oblique opening base planes each forming one side of an open bottomed pyramid when the cup is fully opened, theV other sides of said pyramid being formed bythe side walls of the cup, each of said pyramids having its apex sealed by tri-'- angular folds extending on each side thereof and which in turn are sealed on their opposite sides to the inner side walls of the cup.

A WALTER E. AMBERG.

Referenced by
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DE1056531B *Jan 10, 1956Apr 30, 1959Marius BerghgrachtFluessigkeitsdichte, beutelaehnliche Verpackung
EP0734956A2 *Mar 21, 1996Oct 2, 1996Field Group Public Limited CompanyContainer made from a blank of lightweight foldable sheet material
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/400, 229/106, 229/193, 383/122
International ClassificationB65D5/18, B65D5/00, B65D3/00, B65D3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D3/02, B65D5/18
European ClassificationB65D5/18, B65D3/02