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Publication numberUS2324527 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1943
Filing dateAug 14, 1939
Priority dateAug 14, 1939
Publication numberUS 2324527 A, US 2324527A, US-A-2324527, US2324527 A, US2324527A
InventorsWillard L Morrison
Original AssigneeWillard L Morrison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 2324527 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. L.. MORRISON 2,324,527 RERIGERATING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 14, 1959 s sheets-sheet 1 July zo,Y 1943.

Patented July 20, 1943` n i UNITED STATES `PATENT` OFFICE nEFmGERA'rmG APPARATUS l winni-a L. Morrison, Lake Forest, nl. Application `August 14, 1939, Serial No. 289,940

s claims. (ci. cs2-ssi This invention relates to refrigerating apparatus and has for its object to provide a new and improved device of this description.

The invention has as a.` further object to provide a refrigerating apparatus `having compartments which are at different temperatures, so`

that articles of food can bekept in one compartment at a low temperature and inanother com-1 partment at a higher temperature. The invention has as afurther object to provide a refrigerating apparatus having compartments which are communicating, but which` are at different temperatures, one `compartment being at a low `temperature and another compartment being at a higher temperature. 'I'he invention has as `a. further object to provide arefrigerating apparatus` having a compartment with a partition therein which extends upwardly from, the boti tom, but not clear up to vthe top,` with a cooling device in one `compartment "which primarily cools this compartment, the `cold air passing over `whiletherefrigerating chamber remains cold and without .taking the articles of food out of the refrigerating chamber. f l The invention has further objects which are This refrigerating receptacle is provided at the more particularly pointed out in the accompanying description. i Referring now to the drawings,`Fig. 1 is a view showinga device embodying one form ofthe ini vention;

Fig. 2 is` an Venlarged sectional view taken Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3`3 ofFig.,2; Fig. 4` is a fragmentary sectional view showing the lefthand portion'of'Fig. 3 with someof the parts in a different position; i fFigf is a side elevationvofone end" of one `form of `adjustable partition; l l

Fig. 6-is a. sectional view taken online 6 6 i of Fig. `4;

Fig. 'I isa sectional view taken on` line li-l` 0f Fig. 4: ,l i Eig. `8 isa sectional view taken on line`8-8 ofFig.,4; i .1 l

Fig. 9 is a sectional view showing a modiiied construction;

Fig. 10 is a detailed view showing one method of` movably supporting the cooling element;

Fig. 11 is a view of the upper iefthand corner `of Fig. 4, showing the cooling element moved up to be entirely surrourrdddiy warm aix-.in the room: and e Fig. 12 is `a view showing a modiiled means for permitting pivotal movement of the partition.l

Like numerals refer to `like parts throughout `the several iigures.

In Fig. 1 I have `illustrated a construction where the refrigerating apparatus performs two functions, namely a refrigerator and a. table, thus having thetwo `devices occupying substantiallythe same space. It is of course evident that the device may be used simply asa refrigerator and l.that it may be made in many diierent forms, sizes and shapes. v i

In carrying out the invention I provide a re` frigerating receptacle I. In the construction shown in Figs. l1, 2 and 3 the refrigerating `receptacle is closed at the bottom and on the four sides and is made of `any suitable heat insulating construction. As herein shown, it ismade of two sets of walls 2 and 3, one within theother,

the space between the walls being illled with heat insulating material! of any suitable kind.

top with a suitable door or doors. I prefer to provide two doors 5 and 6 which are'preferably i transparent, although this is not essential. In

the construction shown there are two d0ors,`the

door 5 `being hinged at 1 and the door 6 being hinged at 8.

Within the refrigerating receptacle is a cooling element 9 which may be of any desiredform. It maybe one of the types of ordinary evaporators as now; used,l but I prefer to use a,` cooling element having flat, smooth upper and lower faces and particularly a cooling element described inmylpatent application Serial Number 285,130, filed July 18, 1939. This cooling element is held in position belowthe doors andf` preferably'near the upper edge ofthe refrigerating receptacle. I prefer to have the cooling element movably connected in position so that it maybe moved up or down and I also prefer to have -it pivotally connectedto its-support; as at i0. When thus movably orpivotally supported,

some meansis provided at the outer end of the coolingv element to support this outer end, and for purposes of illustration I have shown `the outer end of the cooling element supported by the flexible supporting members II which are connected to the cooling element, preferably at two opposed edges thereof. These flexible sup- .porting members are also connected to some fixed part, such as the wall of the refrigerating receptacle, by the fastening devices I2. I prefer to have the exible supporting members removably fastened in position, as by means of the hook I3 which can be easily and quickly unhooked. There are preferably two of these ilexible supporting members, one at each edge of the cooling element.

The cooling element may be moved up and down in any desired manner and by any desired means. As herein shown, the part Illa in which the pivot II! is mounted, projects through a slot Illb in the inner wall 3 and is provided with an enlargement IIlc which engages the outer face of this wall. An adjustable member IIld, such as a nut, is placed on the inside of the wall so that when tightened up it will hold the cooling element in any desired position. A groove Ille is formed in the heat insulating material so as to permit the up and down movement of the parts.

The,refrigerant may be supplied to the cooling element in any desired manner, but I prefer to supply it by means of flexible conduits I4 and I5. There is an expansion valve I6 connected with the supply conduit I4 and with the cooling element. By having these conduits I4 and I5 exible, it will be seen that the cooling element may be moved to various positions without aecting these connections.

The refrigerant may be supplied to the cooling element from any desired source. In order to make the device a unitary structure, I prefer to provide means for supplying refrigerant which may be located in a compartment I1 and which may consist of the usual mechanism for this purpose, such as the compressor I8, condenser I9, collector vI9a, motor 20 and fan 2l. The fan blows air through the condenser I9 and there are openings 22 in tl'e wallvof the compartment through which the warm air from the condenser is discharged.

When the device is to be used as a table there are provided a series of table leaves 23. As many of these leaves as desired may be used. 'I'hese leaves are preferably hinged leaves having movable supports 24 by means of which they may be held in their operative positions. When it is desirable, these supports may be moved to the position shown in Fig. 2 so that the leaves may be dropped down as shown on the righthand side of Fig. 1, so as to be out of the way.

Within the refrigerating receptacle is a partition which extends to some point near the upper edge of the receptacle. 'Ihis partition is preferably adjustable vertically and laterally or horizontally. This partition is preferably located at some point between the innermost edge of the cooling element and the opposed wall of the reas shown in Fig. 7. There is preferably a tight f rigerating receptacle and may be adjusted to any t of the member 25 in the loops 2l so that the two members `will stay in any position to which they are adjusted. Any other suitable means may be used for holding the members in any adjusted position, lBy this means the partition may be varied in height so as to bring the upper edge closer or farther away from the cooling element.

This partition as it were divides the refrigerating receptacle `into two chambers 28 and 29 which are connected together at their upperends. These chambers may be varied in size by moving the partition laterally toward and away from the cooling element 9 so as to increase the size of one chamber and decrease the size of the other chamber. Any' suitable means may be provided for holding the partition in any of its adjusted positions. As herein shown the partition is provided at the topand bottom and the opposed ends with the spring members 30 which engage the opposed faces of the inner walls of thel refrigerating receptacle. These spring members permit the partition to be moved laterally andthey also act to hold the partition in any adjusted position.

The cooling element 9 when in use is preferably in a horizontal position and any material to be cooled may be placed on top of it. I have illustrated a series of ice cube trays 3| on top of the cooling element but it is of course evident that any other material which it is desired to freeze may be placed thereon. Y l

The chamber 28 directly below the cooling element will be the colder chamber and the chamber 29 will be the warmer chamber. The chamber 29, for example, may be provided with a series of trays, 32, 32a, 32b,etc. These trays are preferably wire woven trays and are openat the top and one side. They may be supported in position in any desired manner and may be set'one on top of the other if desired. I prefer to have some means for lifting them up so that the material in the lower trays will be easily accessible. In the construction shown, this result is secured by providing at' theopposed ends of the trays the supports 33 which are connected to a member 33a on which the trays rest. Arms 34 are connected to the supports 33, as by means of the pins 35 and the slots 36. These arms are pivoted at 31 and are provided with the members 38. Springs 39 are connected to the membery 38 and to some xed part, as the wall of the refrigeratlng receptacle. These springs tend to lift the trays upwardly and make it easy for anyone desiring to get at the trays, t`o lift them up. The'arms and supports 33 are shown in ldotted lines in Fig. 3 in a partially lifted position with one of the doors open. By opening the other door, the trays can be lifted higher if desired, to secure access to the bottom tray. Lifter rods 35a may engage pins 35 to assist in lifting the trays.

In Fig. 9 -I have shown a modified construction where the refrigerating receptacle "is entirely enclosed at the bottom ends, sidesfand top, one of the sides being provided with a door l0. There is a cooling element 9 and a partition made up of the members 25 and 26 whichv extends across the receptacle and engages the opposite walls by means of the spring members 30, the'-ftw0 members 25 and 26 being adjustable vertically. The air cooled by thecooling element 9 dropspby gravity into the chamber II and the warmer'air passes over the partition and drops by gravity into the chamber 42 ,so that the chambernris cool, but at a higher temperature than the chamber Il. In this construction I have shown the compressor, motor and other refrigerating deway across the refrigerating receptacle so that the t section 414' of thepottom :is `higher than the sect1en4 s,a1theugh thebqttom maybe au; of the sameheightv if desired.` l l the'side ofthe receptacle opening into one. o f the chambers so that accessthereto can be secured,

to remove material therefromorplace material i therein .without Vthe cold n air .from ythe other chamber flowing out. Itwillfurther beseen that lby opening thisdoor'the material yrnayafbeV `ree` movedfrom or inserted .inthe chamber 4|".Without the cool airpas'sing therefrom..y AThis "may` be t facilitated by moving the partitionl .to'ran'inclined position as shown in dotted lines, the spring members holding it in this position. i

. I preferV to provide a door a at the top of the refrigerating receptacle lso that access can be'had to thecooling element 9 and s othat` the cooling element can be'moved up out `of the receptacle,

as is' shown in the other drawings, for purposes of, defrosting or, for other "purposes, This cooling receptacle may be constructed and mounted. so that this can be accomplished by the construc` tion shown in the other drawings. l l t In this construction I prefer to have the `lower 'end oflthe partition pivotally'connected in position so that it maybe. moved to an inclined position, not onlytc` secure access to the chamber 4l. but to` reduce `the height of the partition; For

this purpose a construction similar'fto that shown in Fig. 12 may be` used, where there is at each end a `pin 46 Awhich passes through apart 41 separate from the partition or part 25 and which also passes through' apart 48 connected with' the partition.` There is a spring 49 surrounding the `pin 46. n The pins L46 actas pivots about which the partition can be moved and the springs 48 press the partsV "against the parts48 so as to hold the partition in' any Aof its various positions. n' t A The Yuse and operation of my invention l, are as follows.

When the device is use `it is placed any desired position and the `cooling `element 9 is.

preferably in` a horizontalA position. The refrigerant is then'run throughthe cooling elemilla` eggsjandany other materialwhichit isdel sired lto keep cold, but which shouldgnot be `frozen...` may be placed in chamber 29. The temperature l .intheychamber 2li .maybe varied tosecu-re the .desiredjtemperature by adjusting the partition to, -securethis resulta. i e

l @When it is desired Ato only necessaryaol scrape theffrost from 1 the ,smooth sides .of the cooling element. To `make it easy to `do .thisfthe cooling element may bemoved up out of the receptacle l'by simply sliding the` part Ilia up to the top of theslot |0b..The dotted position of `the cooling, elementin Fig. 4 `shows `the cooling element partially moved up, but'it can ybe moved up solthat itis entirely outsideof the receptacle(V Instead of scraping the frost off. of `the cooling elementiit'can be easilyand quickly t defi-usted by simplymoving the member lila` up to` the top of the refrigerating receptacle and movingrthe cooling 'element about its pivot `to a vertical position. In this position the entire cooling element is outside of therrefrigerating recepl tacle andis in the `Warmyair. The frost will quickly and easily melt, so `that `the cooling element willbe free from frost or ice;Y The waterr due to this meltingrnay` be `caught in a suitable 1 receptacle, either at the bottom of the refrigeratingu receptacle or atqthe` top of the refrigerating l receptaciejust belowthe cooling element. It will be s eenthat this `device can be defrosted by scraping off the Afrost or ice from the cooling element, orby` permitting itV tomelt, without reducing the temperatureof the refrigerating receptacle and without removingany ofthe material therein, for when the doors are open to move the cooling element `up'out of the receptacle,` the cold air will be held lnby gravity and cannot pass `out and the warm airfcannot pass in because itis too light,` the colderair. in the ceptacle preventing this.

A XWhen it is desiredrt'o `maintainl one or the` chambers 28 and 29 at any predetermined refrigerating` retemperature, any suitable automatic shut off dement, which coolsfit to a verylowv temperature. l

Anylsuitable materiallt is desiredto freeze may be placed directly onftop of the coolingelement,

. such, for example, as the ice cube trays, and ice will bevery quickly formed. Itwill beseen that by this means the ice cube trays or whatever is placed on the cooling element, are all in view and their condition easily seen and any one of them vice `for shutting off the supply of `refrigerant may be used and may be set at the desired tem` Y perature to shut off .the refrigerant, to secure this result/.l l

n In aliof these .constructions the conduitsycon ,t necting thecooling element` with the. source oi"` refrigerant supply are flexible and of proper `length topermit the cooling element tobe moved can be easily and quickly removed. They can be t `very cold air remains in the chamber 28 and it is only the warmer air whichpasses over the top of the partition into the chamber `29. `By suit-4 ably regulating the height and horizontal posif tion of the partition, the relative temperature in the two chambers may be greatly varied.`

The chamber 2B may beused for materials it is desired tofreeze, such `as meatabutter, icecream n and any edible material which is notinju'red by freezing. Edibles, such as vegetables, salads,

up out of `the refrigerating receptacle for defrosting orotherpurposes.` Theessential thing i in this` construction so `far as` defrosting is concerned, is that there shall be means for isolating the cooling element from the air within the refrigerating receptaclev while it, is still connected .to the source of refrigerantsupply and surrounding the `cooling element by outside air, and for reassociating the cooling element with air inside the receptacle to cool such air.

I claim:

1. A refrigerating receptacle.. located near thetop thereof and extending part way across said receptaclafand a l Y partition which divides the receptacle into two chambers `of unequal temperatureasaid partitionextending from the bottomy of the receptacle upwardly, with its upper edge belowthe cooling element," the -air around the cooling element beingcooled thereby and dropping by gravity into thechamber below the cooling element and causing'the warmer air to rise andpass over the top defrost.the devicegit is pour of l apparatus comprising a re# `frigerating receptacle closed at the bottom, ends and sides, a coolingelement in said refrigerating the receptacle upwardly, with its upper edge below the cooling element, the air around the cooling element being cooled thereby and dropping by gravity into the chamber below the cooling element and causing the warmer air torise and pass over the top of the partition into the other chamber, so that two connected chambers are provided, cooled to diiferent temperatures by the same cooling element, and means for adjusting the height of said partition to vary the relative temperatures of the two connected chambers.

3. A refrigerating apparatus comprising a refrigerating receptacle closed at the bottom, ends and sides, a cooling element in said refrigerating receptacle, located near the top thereof and extending part way across said receptacle, a partition which divides the receptacle into two charnbers of unequal temperatures, said partition extending from the bottom of the receptacle upwardly, with its upper edge below the cooling element, the air around the cooling element being cooled thereby and dropping by gravity into the chamber below the cooling element and causing the warmer air to rise and pass over the top of the partition into the other chamber, so that two connected chambers are provided, cooled to different temperatures by the same cooling element. and means for varying the relative sizes of said chambers to vary the relative temperatures therein.

4. A refrigerating apparatus comprising a refrigerating receptacle closed at the bottom, ends and sides and having a nat top, a coolingelement in said refrigerating receptacle, located near the top thereof and extending part way across said receptacle, a partition which divides the receptacle into two chambers of unequal temperatures, said partition extending from the bottom of the receptacle upwardly, with its upper edge below the cooling element, the air around the cooling element being cooled thereby and dropping by gravity into the chamber below the cooling element and causing the warmer air to rise and pass over the top of the partition into the other chamber, so that two connected chambers are provided, cooled to diii'erent temperatures by the same cooling element, and a door for covering the top of said refrigerating receptacle, said door when cloud converting the refrigerating receptacle into a table, whereby ';he refrigerating apparatus performs the function zh two pieces of furniture, arefrigerator and a 5. A refrigerating apparatus comprising a refrigerating receptacle closed at the bottom. ends and sides, a cooling element in said refrigerating receptacle, located near the top thereof and extending part way across said receptacle, a partition which divides the receptacle into two chambers of, unequal temperatures, said partition extending from the bottom of the receptacle upwardly, with its upper edge below the cooling element, the air around the cooling element being cooled thereby and dropping by gravity intoy the chamber below the cooling element and causin the warmer air to rise and pass over the. top of the partition into the other chamber, so that two connected chambers are provided, cooled to different temperatures by the same cooling element, a` door for covering the top of said refrigerating receptacle, said door when closed converting the refrigerating receptacle into'a table, said door forming a portion of the top of the table, and

hinged extensions in alignment with said top to extend the table top and which may be moved down along the sides ofthe receptacle' when desired.

6. A refrigerating apparatus comprising a refrigerating receptacle closed at the bottom, ends, sides and top, a cooling element in said'receptacle, located near the top thereof and extending part way across said receptacle,a partition which divides the receptacle into two chambers,

said partition extending from the bottom of the' receptacle upwardly, with its upper edge below the cooling element, the air around the cooling element being cooled thereby and dropping by gravity into the chamber below the cooling element and causing the warmer air to rise and pass over the top of the partition into theother chamber, so as to provide two connecting chambers cooled by the same cooling element, one chamber being at a higher temperature than the other chamber, and a door in the side of the receptacle, opening into one of said chambers, so that materials may be taken from said chamber without permitting the cold air to escape from the other chamber.

' WILLARD L. MORRISON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2418572 *Sep 17, 1943Apr 8, 1947Brennan James EIce cube dispensing refrigerator
US2480763 *Nov 30, 1944Aug 30, 1949Philco CorpRefrigerator
US2497734 *Nov 8, 1946Feb 14, 1950Kuklich Richard JosephFood freezer
US2507834 *Jun 1, 1944May 16, 1950William A McgrewMultiple compartment refrigerator
US2518242 *Apr 5, 1944Aug 8, 1950Bastian Blessing CoRefrigerator having an air pump circuit
US2540940 *Jul 23, 1945Feb 6, 1951Coolerator CompanyStorage and display cabinet
US2607204 *Nov 18, 1949Aug 19, 1952Dole Refrigerating CoDispensing case for frozen foods
US2766594 *Aug 19, 1953Oct 16, 1956Geb Deissinger Ida DilgerBuilt-in kitchen refrigerator
US2938363 *Nov 3, 1958May 31, 1960Foster Refrigerator CorpRefrigerators
US7810891Jul 12, 2005Oct 12, 2010Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator having basket lift apparatus
EP1630504A1Jan 6, 2005Mar 1, 2006LG Electronics Inc.Refrigerator having basket lift apparatus
EP1653181A2 *Aug 10, 2005May 3, 2006LG Electronics Inc.Refrigerator having basket lift apparatus
WO2006126106A1 *Apr 12, 2006Nov 30, 2006Arcelik AsA cooling device
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/326, 62/258, 62/455, 62/448, 62/378, 312/312, 312/313
International ClassificationF25D25/02, F25D11/02
Cooperative ClassificationF25D2400/10, F25D11/02, F25D25/022
European ClassificationF25D11/02, F25D25/02B