Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2324710 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1943
Filing dateApr 6, 1942
Priority dateApr 6, 1942
Publication numberUS 2324710 A, US 2324710A, US-A-2324710, US2324710 A, US2324710A
InventorsLivar Allen P
Original AssigneeChrysler Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall panel for furnace jackets or the like
US 2324710 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 20, 1943. i A. P. LlvAR 2,324,710'

WALL PANEL FOR F'URNAG JACKETS QR THE LIKE Filed April e, 1942 ATTO R N EYS.

Paienied July 2o, 1943 Y UNITED STATES PATENT OF f l 2,324,710 WALL PANE-r. Foa FURNACE JACKETS OR THE LIKE Alieni. livar, Dayton, Ohio, assignor to Chrysler iUorporation, Detroit, Mich., a corporation `of Delaware r ApplicationAprlnG, 1942,-SerialfNo. 437,800

f6 Claims. (Cl. 189-34) vMy present invention relates 'to the 'construction of `wall :panels `for furnace jacketsyor the like, the invention being such 'as-torba of :greatest util;-

AAity for 'insulating-heat radiating bodies, such as furnaces, boilers, water heaters, AVor other Similar devices, 'but being adaptable-to the formation Vof jacketsfor other types ofequipment, such as yair conditioner cabinets, storage ica-binets, and the like. `In other words,-the inventionislof general utility but with one `or two preferredapplications.

The problems to be` solved `in the formation-of furnace jackets for War-mali' furnaces `are man-y and complex, especially in connection with lthe present low cost housing projects due to ithe scarcity of certain materials. In low-cost housthe walls of a utility closet, without using 'the l.

large air gaps or certain materials heretofore found necessary. In other words, where ordinarily a furnace body may `be spacedfour or five inches from the jacket wall and the instructions for us'eof the furnace mayA state that the jacket wall should be spaced a-mim'mum of ten-to twelve inches from the nearest vbuilding wall, governmental bodies at the present time specify `a certain sizeof closet in which a furnace of a specified capacity is to be installed, these specifications usually meaning that the furnace body `maybe spaced only two or three inches .from the jacket walland the jacket Wall only two or -three inches from the closet wall. It is, therefore, imperative that a highly efficient form of insulation for the jacket be devised. It is a primaryobject of the present invention to provide a furnace jacket which can meet theminimum space and maximum heat specifications of small dwellings of the nature described above.

It is the secondary-object of the present, invention to provide a jacket of maximum efficiency which canbe `used to insulate any' body, either to confine heat within the jacktorto prevent `heat `from penetrating into the jacket.

Another object of the present invention is to -provide an insulating jacket `which may be formed of a variety of materials, such materials` Ibeing readily available.

A further object'of the present yinvention Yis to provide an insulating jacket which may bequickly `assembled at lthe point of use from aplurality of 4previously formed panels with a minimum of efforton the part of the assembly crew.

`A. further 4,object of `the present invention is to along une '4 4 of Figs;

provide a panel adapted toforln a portion of a jacket, which panel is quicklyassembled.Without the use of the multitude of screws orioth'er separable fasteners `heretofore used `I'Ja'nelwa's- .semblies, the separable Afastening means required for the `present invention being limited to one ordinary screw.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a jacket panel which may be assembled in much less time than `any Apreviously known jacket panel, thereby reducing the costof equipment for low vcost -housing projects.

The foregoing and other objectsand advantages-.of the present invention may be more readily ascertained from the following Yspecification `taken in connection with the ,accompanying drawing wherein-like numerals `refer-to like parts throughout. l

the drawing,

Fig. 1 is a View in perspective, [with parts broken away, of `a furnace 'utilizing the .present invention; l

Fig. f2 is a horizontal cross-section takeiijsub- .stantially along llne'z-z of rig. 1,;

Fig. 3 `is a vertical `sectin o'f falsingle panel Fig-4 is a detail Vsection taken .substantially Fig. 5 is va detail section showing an enlargement ofthe vportion of Fig. 2 encircled 'in the circle marked 5; and fl Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken throuhjone of thepa-nels lforming the jacket, in `slibstaiitially the plane of Fig. 2, this figure showing the method of assembling the panel-forming members.

The present invention comprises `a plurality of jacket-.panels .lil which may differ Kin configuration in order to provide forfsuch membersas the mounting panel `Ii and inspection door I2 of Va furnace,` but which lare 'otherwise substaritiallt7 duplicates lin detail. A plurality 4ci such panels ...may be united at thelrledges to form affur'nace l `jacket `as shown or 'to form tliejjcket fof `any .othertypeof equipment. In `the tillustr "atior1"the 45 furnace `jacket surroundsafurnace bodyi`3 in which `is enclosed avaporizingburner 'lifhaving oiladrnitted thereto throu'ghltube "l5 "from the being shown only -for purposes of illustration` VEach Aof the jacket panels yIl)` comprises an outer metallic sheet 2U yof l relativelyhavy gauge,

`such as 16 gauge VmetaL-soas to frm a .relatively rigid, form-sustaining outer surface upon which may be applied a layer of paint for decorative purposes. Each panel likewise comprises a thin inner metallic sheet 2i formed of relatively light gauge metal, such as 22 gauge or 24 gauge, the metal being sufliciently resilient that it may be bowed easily but will tend to spring back to a flat plane when released, Both sheets may be formed of ordinary terne-plate or black iron, as` distinguished from previously prescribed sheets of special alloy characteristics.

The outer plate has retaining means extending along each vertical edge portion of one surface of the sheet, these retaining means preferably comprising a Z-bar 22 having one leg 23 fastened to the outer sheet as shown at the left side of Fig. 5, or to members likewise fastened to the outer sheet 26 as shown at the right side of Fig. 5. In either case the members 22 are united to the outer sheet 23 and have a free edge portion 24 formed by the outer leg of the Z-bar spaced from the surface ofthe sheet 25, lying in a plane parallel thereto, and pointing toward the vertical centerline of the sheet so that the retainer members provide inwardly facing open channels extending vertically along the outer edges of the sheets. Each of the retainer members 22 is preferably in the shape of a Z-bar, but other shapes may be used as will be obvious to the skilled metal worker.

Each of the inner metal plates 2| is provided with clip members 25 extending along the ver tical edges thereof in position to engage the portions 24 of the retainer members 22 when the inner and. outer sheets are assembled to lie in parallel planes. The clip members 25 are preferably in the form of shallow Z-bars having one leg 25 fastened to the surface of the sheet 2l and the free leg 21 narrowly spaced from, and lying in a plane horizontal to, the sheet 2| so as to provide narrow outwardly facing open channels of suflicient depth firmly to grip the edge portions 24. A plurality of such clip members may be used although for convenience of assembly a single continuous bar, which likewise acts as a stiffening member forthe sheet 2l, is preferred.

Similarly, the Z-bars 22 are preferably continuous to act as frame members for the jacket.

The inner and outer sheets may be assembled as shown in Fig. 6 by bowing the inner sheet about its vertical centerline to permit engagement of the retainer members and clip members. Pressure at the centerline of the inner sheet may then force the inner sheet toward the outer sheet and force the clip members toV grip the retainer members, the inner sheet being preferably sufficiently resilient to assume a plane parallel to the outer sheet.

The inner sheet is preferably stiffened by fastening a Z-bar Si! along its vertical centerline.;

The depth of the Z-bar is such as to space the inner and outer sheets in parallel planes. Other forms of bar members may be used, but it -is preferred to use a Z-bar since stock used to form the Z-bars 22 may be used to form the Z-barsv the sheet 2B Yto provide an'outwardly facing narrow channel adapted to engage the end edge 34 of the next adjacent panel I0. As shown mi' the illustration, the end edge 34 is bent at right angles to the plane of the sheet so as to provide a corner assembly, but it is to be realized that sthe same construction could be used to provide a longer wall consisting of panels assembled in line with each other. The inner sheets 2l are preferably dimensioned so that their extreme edges substantially abut to form an enclosed vertically extending air space 35 outside of the retainer members 22. Likewise, enclosed air spaces 36 are provided inside of the retainer members 22. 'I'he air spaces afford efficient insulation in addition to the reflecting capacity of the inner sheet 2 I.

The panel members described may be complete for the purpose under consideration, but for high temperatures such as generated by a warm air furnace body further insulation may be necessary, in which case a relatively rigid selfsustaining plaque 40 of insulating material may be slid longitudinally of the sheet 20 with its vertical edges loosely embraced in the channels formed b-y the retainer members 22. In high temperature applications the plaque 49 preferably comprises a body 4| of insulating material such as asbestos, agglomerated vermiculate, or the like, and a reflecting sheet 42 of aluminum foil or the like. Other types of material, either alone or in laminated layers, may be substituted therefor in accordance With the temperature, the materials available, and the purpose to which the panel is to be put as is well-known in the arts.

In order to support the inner` sheet 2l and the insulating plaque 40 (if used) vertically of the outer sheet 20, the outer sheet 29 is provided with a bottom retaining member i5 preferably y in the form of a Z-bar having one leg 46 fastened to the outer sheet 20 and its free leg 4l lying parallel to and spaced from the outer sheet 2) to form an upwardly facing open channel of suiiicient depth to embrace the outer panel 2i). The Z-bar is of relatively rigid construction so asto sustain the weight thus imposed upon it and to eliminate the necessity for fastening the inner and outer sheets to each other or adhering or fastening of the insulating. plaque to the outer sheet.A The Z-bar may extend entirely across the width of the panel so as to prevent air movement through the air spaces 35 and 36 in low temperature installations, but in high temperature installations, such as furnace and boiler jackets, it is preferably of narrow width and placed at the vertical centerline so as to permit relatively unconned and rapid flow of cooling airstreams through the spaces 35 and 3S.

In order to lock the assembly against accidental displacement, there is preferably provided a locking member 5B of deformable material, such as 30 gauge metal, which has one end 5I fastened to the top of the outer sheet 20 at such a height as to be just above the upper edges of the insulating plaqueY 4i] and the inner sheet 2l when they rest upon the bottom retainer member 45. The locking member 5d may be bent to the dotted line positions to permit assembly and then deformed around the upper edge of the sheets as shown in Fig. 3. Preferably, the extreme end 52 of the locking member is fastened to theV top of the inner sheet 2l as by means of a sheet metal screw 53. The locking member is preferably positioned adjacent the upper endof the spacer-member 3i) so that, when the sheet metal screw 53' is applied,

esserlo the sulating plaque preferably extend so as to lie Y adjacent the legs 2l of the retaining clips 25 which thus prevent the insulating `plaque ffrom coming in contact with the inner sheet 2| at any point.

vWl'iile I have illustrated -all metal members of eac-h sub-assembly asbeing spot-welded-to each othenit is obvious that otherefastening means may Vbe *utilized for forming theV sub-assemblies, spot-welding beingv merely the most economical and rapid method of forming the sub-assemblies.

Having illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the same permits of various modicaticns in arrangement and detail. All such modifications as come within the scope of the following claims are considered a part of my invention.

I claim:

1. A panel-for forming a vertical wall of a furnace jacket or the like comprising a relatively rigid outer metal sheet, a retainer bar fastened longitudinally of each vertical edge portion of said sheet with an edge portion of each bar spaced from and lying substantially parallel to said sheet, each of said edge portions of said retainer bars extending toward the central portion of said sheet whereby said retainer bars form opposed open channels, a relatively rigid v plaque of insulating material of lesser thickness than the depth of said channels and having its vertical edges loosely retained in said channels, a relatively resilient inner metal sheet having clip members extending along each vertical edge pori tion thereof in position to engage said edgeA portions of said retainer bars when said inner and outer metal sheets are assembled to lie in parallel planes, and a spacer bar extendinglongitudinally of one of said sheets substantially at the vertical centerline thereof, said inner sheet being sufficiently resilient that it may be bowed about said spacer bar to permit engagement of said clip members with said retainer bars.

2. A panel for forming a vertical wall .of aY furnace jacket or the like comprising a relatively rigid outer metal sheet, a retainer bar fastened longitudinally of each vertical Vedge portion of said sheet with an edge portion of each bar spaced from and lying substantially parallel to said sheet, each of said edge portions of said retainer bars extending toward the central portion of said sheet whereby said retainer bars form opposedopen channels, a relatively rigid plaque of insulating material of lesser thickness than the depth of said channels and having its vertical edges loosely retained in said channels, a relasaid sheet with an edge portion of `each bar spaced from andlying substantially parallel to said sheet, each of said edge portions of -said -retainer bars extending toward the central portion of said `sheet whereby vsaid `retainer bars form opposed open lchannels, a relatively `r'igid plaque of insulating 'material of `lesser thickness than the depth of `said channels and 'having its vertical edges -loosely retained Lin said Ichannels, -a relatively .resilient inner metal sheet having clip members extending along each vertical edge portion thereof 4in position to .engage said edge portions o'f said retainer `bars whensaidinner and outer metal sheets -lare assembled ,to `lie :in parallel planes, and spacerrneans fastened tothe surface of said inner sheet and engageable with said plaque to force said plaque against said outer sheet comprising a relatively rigid bar extending substantially along the vertical centerline of said inner sheet.

4. A panel for forming a vertical wall of a furnace jacket or the like comprising a relatively rigid outer metal sheet, a retainer bar fastened longitudinally of each vertical edge portion of said sheet with an edge portion of each bar spaced from and lying substantially parallel to said sheet, each of said edge Aportions of said retainer bars extending toward the central portion of said sheet whereby said retainer bars form opposed open channels, `a relatively rigid plaque of insulating material of lesser thickness than the depth of said channels and having its vertical edges loosely retained in said channels, a relatively resilient inner metal sheet having clip members extending along each vertical edge portion thereof in position to engage said edge portions of said retainer bars when said inner and outer metal sheets are assembled to lie in parallel planes, spacer means fastened to the surface of said inner sheet and engageable with said plaque to force said plaque against said outer sheet, and a bottom retainer member comprising a relatively rigid clip carried by said outer sheet and adapted to embrace the lower edges of said plaque and said inner sheet.

5. A panel forrforming a vertical wall of a furv nace jacket or the like comprising` a relatively tively resilient inner metal, sheet having clip members extending along each vertical edge portion thereof in position to engage said edge portions of said retainer bars when said inner and outer metal sheets are assembled to lie in parallel planes, and spacer means fastened to the sur- 1 face of said inner sheet and engageable with said plaque to force said plaqueV aga-inst said cuter sheet.V

3. A panel for forming a vertical wall of a furnace jacket or the like comprising a relatively rigid outer metal sheet, a retainer bar fastened longitudinally of each vertical edge portion of rigid Vouter metal sheet, a retainer bar fastened longitudinally of each vertical edge portion of said sheet with an edge portion of each bar Vspaced from and lying substantially parallel to said sheet,V each of said edge portions of said retainer bars extending toward the central portion of said sheet whereby said retainer barsV form opposed open channels, a relatively rigid plaque `of insulating material of lesser thickness than the depth of said channels and having itsvertical edgesloosely retained in said channels, a

relatively resilient inner metal sheet having clip` members extending along each vertical edge portion thereof in position to engage said edge portions of said retainer bars when said inner andv outer metal sheets are assembled to lie in parallel planes, spacer means fastened to the surface of said inner sheet and engageable with said plaque to force said plaque against said` outer sheet, a bottom retainer member comprising a relatively rigid clip carried by said outer sheet and adapted to embrace the lower edges of said plaque and said inner sheet, and a locking member comprising a deformable clip carried by said outer sheet and adapted to be formed around the upper edges of said plaque and said inner sheet.

6. A panel for forming a vertical wall of a furnace jacket or the like comprising a relatively rigid outer metal sheet, a retainer bar fastened longitudinally of each vertical edge portion of said sheet with an edge portion of each bar spaced from and lying substantially parallel to said sheet, each of said edge portions of said retainer bars extending toward the central portion of said sheet whereby said retainer bars form opposed open channels, a relatively rigid plaque of insulating material of lesser thickness than the depth of said channels and having its vertical edges loosely retained in said channels, a relatively resilient inner metal sheet having clip members extending along each vertical edge portion thereof in position to engage said edge portions of said retainer bars when said inner and outer metal sheets are assembled to lie in parallel planes, spacer means fastened to the surface of said inner sheet and engageable with said plaque to force said plaque against said outer sheet, a bottom retainer member comprising a relatively rigid clip carried by said outer sheet and adapted to embrace the lower edges of said plaque and said inner sheet, a locking member comprising a deformable clip carried by said outer sheet and adapted to be formed around the upper edges of said plaque and said inner sheet, and means to fasten said locking member to the top of said inner sheet.

ALLEN P. LIVAR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2528771 *Jun 14, 1944Nov 7, 1950Emil L MusteeSectional casing for fluid heaters
US2763321 *Aug 26, 1949Sep 18, 1956Custom Metal Products IncDouble-walled metal combustion chamber
US2861713 *Jul 20, 1956Nov 25, 1958Universal Fabricated ProductsMetal clad insulating floating roof
US2862584 *Oct 4, 1954Dec 2, 1958Allen Francis EExpansible wall structure
US3010599 *Jul 22, 1958Nov 28, 1961Armstrong Cork CoThermally insulated tank structure
US3117353 *Jun 7, 1960Jan 14, 1964Woodwork Corp Of AmericaPanel mounting means
US3243931 *Nov 6, 1961Apr 5, 1966Detroit Edison CoPrefabricated thermal insulation panel
US3802146 *Mar 14, 1972Apr 9, 1974Steelcase IncPanel system
US4732431 *May 21, 1986Mar 22, 1988Whirlpool CorporationInterchangeable door panels for dishwasher
US5170550 *Feb 28, 1991Dec 15, 1992Rheem Manufacturing CompanyDouble-walled cabinet structure for air conditioning equipment
US5255969 *Sep 4, 1992Oct 26, 1993Rheem Manufacturing CompanyDouble-walled cabinet structure for air conditioning equipment
US5806942 *Dec 26, 1996Sep 15, 1998White Consolidated Industries, Inc.Dishwasher door and decorator panel assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/794.1, 29/453, 126/114, 220/567.3, 220/592.21
International ClassificationF24H9/02
Cooperative ClassificationF24H9/02
European ClassificationF24H9/02