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Publication numberUS2325165 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 27, 1943
Filing dateMar 12, 1942
Priority dateMar 12, 1942
Publication numberUS 2325165 A, US 2325165A, US-A-2325165, US2325165 A, US2325165A
InventorsGoodwin Carl W
Original AssigneeAmerican Seal Kap Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remote photoelectric control
US 2325165 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 27, 1943.. c. w. GOODWIN 2,325,165

REMOTE PHOTOELECTRIC CONTROL Filed March 1-2, 1942 ORNEY Patented July 27, 1943 ENT oFFice ammo-rs rnoronmcrmc common Carl w. Goodwin, Plainiield, N. 3., assigno'r to American .Seal-Kap Corporation of Delaware, Wilmington, Del.,'a corporation of Delaware Application amen- 12, 1942, Serial No. 434,326 4 Claims. (01. 226-881) This invention relates to control systems for electric motors and the like such as are employed in bottle capping machines, and has for its o'brotate until a tube containing a stack or caps is brought into registration with the supply chamject to provide a new and improved system for controlling such apparatus in accordance with the feed of caps to th machine, without the intervention of objectionable mechanical controls.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved control system of the above type in which the electrical mechanisms controlling the feed of a machine are enclosed in a protective housing apart from the feeding zone of the machine.

Another object is to provide a feeding mechanism for bottle capping machines with improved means for automatically positioning a succession of stacks of caps in operative relationship with respect to a cap supply chamber.

Another object is to provide a photoelectric relay having novel and improved characteristics.

Another object is to provide a remote control for a photoelectric relay.

Various other objects and advantages will be apparent as the nature of the invention is more fully disclosed.

For purposes of illustration the invention will be described in its application to a machine for app y n flexible skirted hood caps to milk bottles or the like, such as is disclosed in the copending application of C. W. Goodwin & H. W. Martin, Serial No. 399,280, filed June 23, 1941;

The capping machine disclosed in the abovementioned Goodwin & Martin application includes a magazine adapted to contain a plurality of stacks of nested preformed caps which are ar-.

ranged to be successively brought into operative position to feed the stacks of caps into a supply chamber from which they are successively picked by a picker mechanism and are rolled along a feed chute on the lower edges of their skirts. The cap skirts contain an adhesive which is soitenedas the caps pass along the feed chute, after which they proceed to a capping station where they are seated on the necks oi milk bottles which then advance to a sealing station where the caps are finally sealed in place.

In the machine disclosed in the above-mentioned Goodwin & Martin application, the magazine cooperating with the cap supply chamber comprises a rotatable turret containing a plurality of tubes carrying reserve stacks of caps, which are adapted to successively register with the supply chamber when the turret is rotated by an electric motor. The motor is controlled by a mechanical finger which is normally held in inoperative position by the caps in the supply chamber,

- but is adapted to be released by the exhaustion oi said caps. When so released, the mechanical finger closes an electric contact which energizes her, whereupon such new stack of caps slides downwardly by gravity into the supply chamber and at-the-same time operates-the control finger to shut oi! the current to the driving motor and thus stop the rotation of the turret.

The ioregoing cap-actuated device. and associated mechanisms insure a suflicient supply of caps to enable the machine to operate substantially without supervision and without replenishing the cap supply tor a considerable period of time.

The present invention provides a new and improved system for controlling apparatus of the above type in accordance with the feed oi the machine, without the use of mechanical controls. This is accomplished in accordance with the present invention by' controlling the driving motor of the magazine turret through a remote photoelectric relay, and-by actuating said relay in. ac-

. cordance with' the passage of light through an opening in the cap supply chamber through the intermediary of a rod of a transparent light conducting material having the property of bending and conducting light rays in an irregular path.

Such material may comprise the acrvla'te and methylacrylate resins, such as resin known as Lucite, the most common material having the above properties. Various substances having the above properties may be used. In this way, as

hereinafter described, the entire mechanism for operating the cap magazine may be enclosed within a protective housing apart from the feeding zone of the nmchine where it is iully'pro tected when the exposed portions of the machine are to be washed or cleaned.

Although the novel features which are believed to be characteristic of this invention are pointed out more particularly in the claims appended hereto, the invention itself may be better understood by referring .to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing forming a part thereof in which a specific embodiment of the invention has been set forth for purposes of illustration.

In the drawing,

Fig. l is a transverse sectional view through the magazine of a capping machine embodying the invention, taken on line il of Fig. 3;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the mechanism shown in Fig. l; and

Fig. 3 is a transverse longitudinal section taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2.

In the following description and in the claims certain specific terms have been used tor convenience in referring to various details of the invention. These terms, however. are .to be given as broad an interpretation as the state of the art will permit.

the driving-motor and thus causes the ill-(i to Referring to the drawing more in detail,.the

invention is shown as applied to a cappin mechanism comprising magazine M having a plurality of tuba adapted to contain a plurality of stacks of nested caps for successive application to milk bottles, and from which successive caps are picked by a suitable picker mechanism and supplied to a chute along which the caps roll and from which they advance through a series of operations until they .are finally sealed upon the necks of the bottles, as fully described in the above-mentioned Goodwin & Martin application. Only so much of the Goodwin 8: Martin machine i shown herein as isnecessary to an understanding of the present invention.

The cap magazine is shownin the drawing as comprising a stationary housing attached by a bracket 3 to a suitable pedestal which is adapted to rest upon the fioor in a convenient position with respect to the bottle filling machine. A rotatable turret I in the form of a hollow casting having a hub 8 is mounted for rotation on a bear.

ing sleeve 3 carried on a stationary pin l0 which is mounted in a boss l2 formed in the housing I. The turret I is provided with a plurality of openings i3 adapted to receive tube I4 which carry the various stacks of caps II. The tubes i4 and the correspondingportions of the turret I are provided with longitudinal openings H, which facilitate the manual filling of the tubes with the stacks of caps.

In practice the stacks of caps are usually wrapped in paper to form units corresponding in size and length generally to the tubes H. The units are inserted as such in said tubes and the stack is unwrapped in situ by unrolling and removing the paper through the longitudinal opening II. This procedure not only facilitates the loading of the magazine but prevents the caps from being touched by the hand during the loading operation.

The caps l5 may be of the general type disclosed in the copending application of Herbert G. Vore S. N. 391,125, which comprises a center diaphragm or closure portion l8, an annular pouring lip housing I3 and a fluted skirt 20 carrying a band of thermoplastic adhesive on the outer surface thereof as shown in Fig. 1.

The caps I! are inserted in the tubes with their fiuted skirts 20 extending rearwardly and with their diaphragms l8 and pouring lip housings I9 extending forwardly. The magazine M is arranged at an inclination to the horizontal so that the caps feed forwardly by gravity.

The housing 5 is formed with a cap supply chamber 2| with which the successive tubes M are adapted to register as the turret l is rotated, so that the caps from the corresponding tubes I4 slide downwardly by gravity into the supply chamber 2| when the tubes are properly positioned. The supply chamber 2| has longitudinal openings or slots 22 arranged diametrically opposite each other in the wall of the chamber, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

For rotating or indexing the turret I, a motor 23 is provided driving. a worm 24 which meshes with a worm wheel 25 rotatably mounted on the pin Ill and having a key 26 engaging a keyway 21 in the hub 3 of the turret l. The turret may thus be lifted from the pin I0 and removed for cleaning without disturbing the worm wheel 25 and driving mechanism. The worm gears provide a nonreversible drive to hold the turret against rotation when the motor is stopped. Suitable latch means may be used, however, if desired, to latch the turret in successive feed positions. The supply chamber 2| is provided at its discharge end with acap retaining ring 28 which holds the stack of caps in the supply chamber until the individual caps are successively removed by the picker mechanism (not shown) and delivered to the chute C, as described in the above-mentioned Goodwin 8: Martin application.

In accordance with the present invention, the motor 23 is operated by a motor control relay 28 which, in turn, is actuated by a photoelectric relay 30, both of which relays are entirely enclosed in the main housing I of the cap magazine, as shown in Fig. 1. For operating the motor 23 in accordance with the supply of stacks in supply chamber 2|, an electric lamp 32 is mounted on the housing 3 adjacent one of the slots 22 in supply chamber 2|, and one end 33 of a rod 34 of light conducting material is disposed adjacent the opposite slot 22 in chamber 2| diametrically opposite the lamp 32, so that the rays from lamp 32dmay be focused directly on the end 33 of the ro The rod 34 projects ,through an opening in housing I and istightly sealed therein by a gasket 33 01. rubber or other suitable material, the rod being bent as required to bring its inner end 33 adjacent the photoelectric activating element of relay 30 as shown in Fig.1. The rod may be made in two or more sections if desired. When the supply chamber 2| is filled with a stack of caps, the caps will obstruct the passage of light from lamp 32 to the end 33 of the rod 3|, and under such conditions the photoelectric relay 30 will be deenergized. However, when the entire stack of caps has been fed past the field of lamp 32, the light from said lamp will pass through the diametrically opposite openings 22 in chamber 2| and impinge upon the end 33 of rod 34. Due to the unique property of said light conducting material the light focused on the end 33 of rod 34 will be conducted through the entire length of the rod, including the bent portions thereof, and be focused upon the photoactive element of the photoelectric relay 30. I'hereupon, the photoelectric relay 30 actuates the motor control relay 29, setting the motor 23 1 in operation.

The motor 23 accordingly drives the worm wheel 26 and causes the turret I to rotate slow ly. This rotation of the turret continues until a tube It containing a supply of caps I5 is brought into registration with the supply chamber 2|. When this occurs, the stack of caps in the tube l4 slides downwardly into the supply chamber, obstructing the passage of. light from lamp 32 through the slots 22 in the wall of cham-' ber 2|. Thus cuts oil the light to photoelectric relay 30 and thereby stops the motor 23. The turret I remains in this position until the supply of caps in the tube l4 cooperating with the supply chamber 2| is exhausted, after which the above described operation is repeated to bring a new tube I4 into supply position. The empty tubes I4 may be manually filled from time to time as required. In this way a large number of caps is maintained at all times in the magazine M.

An important feature of the invention, as described above, is that the entire mechanisms for operating the magazine M, including motor 23 and associated elements, motor control relay 29', and photoelectric relay 30, are enclosed within the main housing 5, even the rod 34 being sealed insaid housing by the gasket 35, so that all of said mechanisms are fully protected when the exposed portions of the machine are to be washed ing the photoelectric relay.

or cleaned. Furthermore, due to the novel combination of elements above described, the motor 23 and its associated operating mechanisms may be mounted compactly and-conveniently within the remote controlled photoelectric relay has been set forth for illustration only. The relay is capableof various uses in cases where the source of light is to be located at a point removed from the photoelectric cell. The light path, including saidrod 34, may have a gap at any convenient point to permit the insertion of a member to interrupt-the light rays for operat- IIence both the photoelectric cell and the light source may be located at points remote from the actuating member. Furthermore, the rod 34 prevents unauthorized operation of the relay by accidentally blocking the light rays at points other than the intended position of the operating member.

Although a specific embodiment of the invention has been shown for purposes of illustration, it is to be understood that various changes and modifications may be made therein as will be readily apparent to a person skilled in the art. Furthermore, the features set forth above may be applied to other types of capping machines and for other uses and are not restricted to the specific combination disclosed. The invention is only to be limited in accordance with the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a machine for applying to containers and sealing thereon partially preformed hood caps having foldable pleated skirts, a supply chamber containing a stack of said caps to be fed therealong by gravity for successive removal and application to bottle necks, a supply magazine containing a plurality of reserve stacks of caps, driving means actuating said magazine to successively advance said reserve stacks into position for feeding into said supply chamber, means including a photoelectric relay for actuating said dri'ving means, a light source mounted to be normally' obstructed by the caps in said supply chamber and to direct light rays through said chamber upon the exhaustion of such caps therein, and means cooperating with said light source for focusing the unobstructed light rays upon said photoelectric relay to actuate said driving "said magazine comprising a rotatable turret,

driving means to rotate said turret, a photoelectric device remote from said supply chamber for actuating said driving means, a light source mounted to be normally obstructed by the caps in said S p y chamber and to direct light rays through said chamber upon the exhaustion of such caps therein, and a rod of'light conducting material having one end arranged to receive unobstructed light rayspassing through said supply chamber and the other end arranged to focus such light rays upon said photoelectric device to actuate said driving means and thereby automatically advance said turret when one supply of caps in said supply chamber has become exhausted.

3. In a machine for applying to containers and sealing thereon partially preformed hood caps having foldable pleated skirts, an inclined supply chamber containing a stack of said caps to be fed therealong by gravity for successive removal and application to bottle necks, a supply magazine containing a plurality of reserve stacks of caps, said magazine comprising a rotatable turret, a plurality ofstack receiving tubes spaced peripherally around said turret and carried thereby, said tubes being adapted to successively register with said supply chamber as said turret is rotated, driving means remote from said supply chamber for rotating said turret, a closed housing for said driving means, a photoelectric device in said housing for actuating said driving means,

a light source mounted to be normally obstructed by the caps in said supply chamber and to direct light rays through said chamber upon the exhaustion of'such caps therein, and a rod or li h conducting material extending through said housing and having one'end arranged to receive unobstructed light rays passing through said supply chamber and the other end arranged to focus such light rays upon said photoelectric device to actuate said driving means and thereby automatically advance said turret when one supply of caps in said supply chamber has become exhausted.

4. In a machine for applying to containers and sealing thereon partially preformed hood caps having foldable pleated skirts, an inclined supply chamber containing astack of said caps to be fed thereal'ong by gravity for successive removal and application to bottle necks, a supply magazine containing a plurality of reserve stacks of caps, said magazine comprising a rotatable turret, a plurality of stack receiving tubes spaced peripherally around said turret and carried thereby, said tubes being adapted to successively register with said supply chamber as said turret is rotated, driving means remote from said supply chamber for rotating said turret, a sealed housing containing. said driving means, a photoelectricdevice in saidhousing for actuating said driving means, a light source moimted to be normally obstructed by the caps in said-supply chamher and to direct light rays through said chamber upon the exhaustion of such caps therein, and a rod of light conducting material extending through said housing and having one end arranged to receive unobstructed light rays passing through said supply chamber and the other end arranged to focus such light rays upon saidhotoelectric device to actuate said driving means and thereby automatically advance said turret when one supply of caps insaid supply chamber hasbecome exhausted. said Lucite rod being bent within said housing and sealed therein to render said housing water-tight.

CARL W. GOODWIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493212 *Jun 3, 1946Jan 3, 1950Standard Cap & Seal CorpApparatus for feeding and transferring articles
US2498193 *Dec 28, 1946Feb 21, 1950Coca Cola Bottling Company OfWarning signal for crowning machines
US2682986 *Feb 18, 1948Jul 6, 1954Jonsson Einar JosefDevice for filling and emptying tubular magazines, for example with piled caps and the like
US2868413 *Dec 6, 1954Jan 13, 1959Melpar IncAutomatic machinery
US2906072 *Nov 16, 1955Sep 29, 1959W F & John Barnes CompanyCan cover feed
US3144168 *Dec 8, 1961Aug 11, 1964Western Electric CoApparatus for continuously feeding articles to machines
US3306490 *Dec 9, 1964Feb 28, 1967Mccall CorpFeeding apparatus for books or the like
US3929326 *May 29, 1974Dec 30, 1975Gd SpaDevice for accumulating and supplying lengths of material in sheet form
US4558802 *Jul 5, 1984Dec 17, 1985Elsner Engineering Works, Inc.Carousel type dispenser
US4653665 *Feb 27, 1984Mar 31, 1987Molex IncorporatedConnector cassette and feed system
US4896792 *Jul 26, 1988Jan 30, 1990Michel MarchandAutomatic dispensing device for products and central warehouse or store constructed with such devices
US5154315 *Jun 26, 1991Oct 13, 1992Van Dam Machine CorporationLid loading and conveying assembly
US5472114 *Jul 11, 1994Dec 5, 1995Riverwood International CorporationTurret magazine assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification221/11, 221/104, 250/223.00R, 250/215, 221/176
International ClassificationB23Q7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB23Q7/00, B23Q2707/02
European ClassificationB23Q7/00