Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2326713 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1943
Filing dateOct 25, 1939
Priority dateOct 25, 1939
Publication numberUS 2326713 A, US 2326713A, US-A-2326713, US2326713 A, US2326713A
InventorsWilliam J Wesseler
Original AssigneeWilliam J Wesseler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shielding device
US 2326713 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. J. WESSELER SHIELDING DEVICE Filed Oct. 25, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 mvENToR. g Wea/Anfang ATTORNEYS.

Aug. l0, 1943. w. J. wl-:ssELl-:R

SHIELDING bEVIcE Filed oct. 25, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 n 1' f/j INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS.

Aug. 10, 1943. w. J. wl-:ssELl-:R

- SHIELDING DEVICE Filed Oct. 25, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented Aug. 10, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHIELDING DEVICE William J. Wesseler, East Cleveland, Ohio Application October 25, 1939, Serial No. 301,197

19 Claims.

This invention, as indicated, relates to a shielding device. More particularly it comprises structures having exceptiona1 capacity to resist impact and strains, including those due to concussion and explosive effects. It includes fabric structures, particularly those made of special knitted Wire and the like, adapted to be fashioned and formed into a wide variety of unts, having openings or marginal contours as required, to be used alone or as parts of larger structures and highly resistant to destruction under heavy duty conditions, especially in military and naval service. It includes fabric used alone, or associated with, or embedded in other material, for minimizing the destructive effects of bombs, torpedoes and similar elements of warfare. At the present time the principal means for protection against bombs, high explosive shells and the like has been sand bags reinforced at times with metallic shielding material. In all such instances no efforts have been made to modify or completely reduce the effects of the explosion itself by conning such explosive effects in an enclosure equipped to withstand complete destruction and having means for absorbing most of the energy produced through such explosion. The present invention includes combining the protective devices first referred to with means for reducing the destructive effects of explosive devices and insuring the security of certain areas from aerial bomb, shell, or torpedo attack. By reducing the destructive effects of such explosive elements to very limited localized areas the actual losses occasioned thereby will be relatively unimportant.

The principal object of the present; invention is to provide a fabric structure adapted to be fashioned into parts, or units, which may have openings or marginal contours, as required, to be used alone or as parts of larger structures, flexible or non-flexible in character, and highly resistant to destruction under heavy duty conditions, especially in military and naval services.

Another object of the invention is to provide means of a flexible character and particularly adapted to resist heavy impact and strains, including those due to concussion and explosive effects, and penetration of missiles of various types.

Another object of the invention is to provide means of a relatively light flexible character adapted to be positioned in the path of enemy projectiles, and serve to prevent or reduce the attendant damage ordinarily occasioned thereby.

Another object of the invention is to provide an enclosure to entrap explosive devices and reduce the destructive effects thereof, and also to protect explosives in storage and transit against enemy attack, and to restrict the damage in the event of accidental discharge of explosives in time of peace or war. l

Another object of the invention is to provide a fabric sheet having substantially smooth surfaces on each of its sides, such fabric sheet being preferably constructed of strong material, such as Wire, and more especially of knitted wire, or other suitable material, which in turn may have each of the strands forming the secondary knitted fabric in the form of tubular knitted construction, which alsomay be wire or the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide flexible units of wire fabric suitably combined with other metallic or non-metallic elements of a character resistant to impact and explosion effects, and which may be used for shielding human beings when used as a personal protection, or shielding any of the equipment and stations requiring protection during warfare, or at other times.

Another object of the invention is to provide light flexible wire sheets adapted for individual soldiers to carry and which may be united with other units of the same character to form protective shields against Various types of enemy attack.

Another object of the invention is to provide a knitted wire fabric which may be made of narrow mesh and used as a fence or Wall to vintercept flying fragments, or which may be laid flat With or Without the addition of other material and used as a indestructible roadway for transporting heavy equipment, and thereafter raised to protective position, if desired.

Another object of the invention is 4to provide cheap flexible material of wire or the like which may be used as original equipment or replacement belts or trackways for tanks and like structures, and which at the same time may be adapted for use as shields whenv carried as spare parts.

A further object of the invention is to provide a structural material for walls, roofs and oors of buildings and the like which may withstand concussive effects without destruction, and also resist incendiary attack.

Other and further objects of the invention will appear in the course of the following description.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention, then, consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the annexed drawings and the following description setting forth in detail certain structures embodying the invention, such disclosed means constituting, however, but several of various forms in which the principle of the invention may be used.

In said annexed drawings:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic plan view of a fabric embodying the principles of the invention with the loops in compressed form;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of a tubular knitted structure embodying the principles of the invention;

Fig. 3 is a greatly enlarged perspective view partly in section showing the relation of the strands in closely knitted fabric of the type shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

-Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic plan view of a selvaged fabric having slits and marginal separations embodying the principles of the invention;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged diagrammatic view showing auxiliary material knitted into the fabric, and embedded around said fabric;

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic plan view showing ller material engaged within the loop structure;

Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic plan view showing a fashioned protective cover of knitted wire material;

Fig. 8 is a side elevation in outline showing a cover of the type illustrated in Fig. 7 as applied to an automobile;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view showing a cover of the type illustrated in Fig. 7 as applied to a trench;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary perspective View showing a small size protective cover of the general type illustrated in Fig. 7, as set up on the inside of a closed vehicle, and also showing resistant fabric in the body of the vehicle;

Fig. 11 is a front view in outline showing the cover illustrated in Fig. 7 in use as an inclined protective screen;

Fig. 12 is a diagrammatic plan view showing a protective garment shield for an individual, em bodying the principles of the invention;

Fig. 13 is a side ,elevation in outline showing the structure illustrated in Fig. 12 as applied to an individual;

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary perspective View showing tubular enclosures set up in extended form and staggered relation to intercept explosive projectiles, hand grenades and the like;

Fig. 15 is a plan view of a protective cover with associated explosive resistant chambers, as applied to a eld ammunition dump;

Fig. 16 is a transverse View, partly in section, of the structure, shown in Fig. 15;

Fig. 17 is a perspective view in outline showing shock-proof buildings and streets, and net and bag defense against aerial bombs, inflammable projectiles and the like;

Fig.18 is a fragmentary View in sectional outline showing units embodying the principles of the invention, as applied to a ship;

Fig. 19 is a view similar to Fig. 17 showing the protective structure applied to a bridge; and

Fig. 20 is a view similar -to Figs. 17 and 19 showing the protective structure applied to a canal, docks, locks and the like.

As is shown more particularly in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the preferred type of fabric employed in the shielding device is a knitted fabric of the general type disclosed in my previously issued patent Number 1,968,061, showing a tubular structure, such as an individual strand in Fig. 1 and the tubular cylinder, or bag, shown in Fig. 2, and the iiat type of fabric disclosed in my duce their destructiveness.

Patent Number 2,148,517, showing the at knitted body illustrated in Fig. 1. 'I'he strands l are preferably knitted wire of small diameter. but of high tensile strength consistent with suflicient flexibility to permit the knitting operation to be carried out without undue difllculty. The fabric may be manufactured at relatively high speed on apparatus embodying the principles set forth in my patents above referred to. For very large units the strands may be preformed in suitable lengths by heavy hydraulic presses or the like. and then interengaged by other presses to form the type of fabric with smooth surfaces disclosed in said patents. Hydraulic or heavy duty apparatus may be used to'operate machines of the type shown in -my patents, both to draw the loops and to retract them to the final size desired. After the strands are interengaged and the fabric 2 is completed, as shown in Fig. 1, various plating or hardening processes may be applied to one or both surfaces to chrome harden or case harden, hot metal spray, or otherwise coat or condition the finished fabric to be impact and explosion resistant.

The tubular strand l is similar in structure to the narrow part of the member 3 shown in Fig. 2 wherein one series of wires' 4 are alternately drawn through previously formed loops on another series of Wires 5 in succession and in turn cast off and drawn to any desired loop size, as explained in my said patent, Number 1,968,061. The tubular structure, as stated, may be progressively narrowed as shown centrally in Fig. 2, and by severing the narrow area 6 two knitted bags or enclosures 1 will be provided. These bags, or chambers, may be made in various shapes and sizes and may be adapted to nest one within the other, as will be presently explained. The loops may be drawn to leave very narrow openings in the Wall of the enclosure, and the size of such openings, which may be free or wholly or partially filled with suitable material has a bearing on the effectiveness'of such bags as explosion chambers to entrap bombs and the like and re- The ller material used may be of an extremely wide selection, such as paper, treated cotton, or other fibrous material, asbestos, glass fibre, rayon, rubber, sand or clay in bags, soft metal, such as copper, aluminum, lead and other materials too numerous to mention.

As stated, a number of bags may be in nested or telescoped relation, with a common opening, and may have a loose flap inwardly moving closure over the open end which may be of similar wire knitted fabric. 'I'he openings, or interstices, between the loops in the respective nested bags may be progressively varied to obtain greater energy absorbing power, the reaction taking place somewhat in the manner of the bailling of the exhaust rgases in a muiiler on a gas engine. Where the opening of the bag is left wholly or partially open, some of the force of the discharge will be spent in an upward direction and will be less destructive to adjacent objects that Where such discharge is Wholly unconfined. The bags should preferably be long enough to have their lower portions collapsed and flexible so as to yield after the manner of a curtain before the full force of the explosive action is applied to the fabric.

The fabric shown in Fig. 1, as stated, is preferably formed of knitted strands, as any vstrains imposed thereon will result in the stretching rather than in the breaking of any individual strand. When made in accordance with my pathowever, as many of the protective covers herein--I after described will act very elciently,'lf made of conventional wire strands, since many such structures are supported to swing freely from a line in the manner of a drape or curtain, and the movement of the whole structure, as wel1 as the localized resistance to rupture, has a most effective projectile stopping and deflecting action. The fabric may be produced very rapidly in the form of continuous plain strips with selvaged edges, and such strips can be used in an emergency for belts for caterpillar tractors as well as in larger widths laid down as roadways. bridge traic surfaces and for many other uses too numerous to mention. Besides using Wire for the knitting it is possible to lcombine fibres with wire, or to use all fibres, or any other types of strands as the material for the knitted body with paper. asbestos, wire, steel rods, steel wool, or other suitable material, engaged within the knitted str'uce ture, as will be presently explained. The strands may be solid or built up material of one or more kinds, and may be braided or Woven as well as knitted where adequate strength may be obtained at less cost of manufacture. However, the maximum of performance should be obtained from knitted strands as well as a knitted body.

The advantages already pointed out in connection with the structure of the tubular knitted strands is also present in fiat knitted fabric shown in Fig. 1, the opposite surfaces of the fiat fabric being in. effect formed of what may be termed "knuckle-jointed loops as shown in outline in Fig. 3, such surfaces being identical and free of cross loops on the exterior of the fabric. 'I'he direction of the strands through the fabric may be varied by shogging to any desired extent in either direction during fabrication, particularly in cylindrical machines. There is no obstruction to free sliding of missiles and projectiles off such surfaces, but at the same time there is a resistance to penetration of -such surface and a retardlng or braking action progressively carried on by a tightening of loops elsewhere in the fabric along the line'of the strand or strands being subjected to the most severe tensile strains. Thus the energy-of the missile is absorbed and deformation rather than rupture of the strands takes place. Since the fabric may be produced at relatively high speed and low cost along the lines set forth in my patents referred to above, the matter of replacement of locally injured portions of any extended structure is a simple matter as the flexible fabric may be readily transported in rolled form and applied without delay, and is fully as effective for many uses as solid metal plates which are transported and applied with the greatesi-l difficulty, and which involve expenditure of much time for installation.

It will be noted that this fabric, Whether made of knitted strands of wire or the like as shown in Fig. 1, or of solid wire strands 8 as shown in Fig. 4, provides a selvage at each lateral margin 9, I0, and has a knotted top and bottom edge which may be provided with integral braided or twisted anchoring terminals II, I2. In adwire strand I1 is interlooped with the steel wire and the like.

dition to the advantageous smooth finish of the lateral margins of the structure which permits handling without danger of painful scratchesl the method of fabrication permits the provision of narrow slits I3 or openings I4, of extended width, in any shape and in any desired locations in the fabric sheet, and each vof such slits is formed on its lateral edges with anintegral selvage likewise permitting safe handling and use. For military and naval purposes this fabric presents exceptional advantages having ready portability in sectional units which may be easily in-v terlocked to form larger structures and at all times ready'for heavy duty performance. It is a double thickness non-run interlocking loop fabric, presenting a at, obstruction-free surface on each side, over which missiles may freely slide. It can also be fashioned in three dimensions by adding or dropping loops, as in shaping the hood for the individual protective garment, as shown' in Fig. 13,v presently to be described. Through the omission of continuity at selected strand feeds across the fabric Width, slots I5 or marginal separations I6 may be provided, thus fashioning the fabric to the desired structure without any cutting and weaving or Welding operations in strands on-one or both sides, and certain strands may be floated or twisted alone, or with other strands. and fibrous material or other metallic or non-metallic strands maybe incorporated. Thus, as shown in one row in Fig. 5,-a copper strand I8 to servex as a heat dissipating means by reason of its high conductivity. As shown in the lower part of Fig. 5, asbestos strands I9'are incorporated with the steel. wire strands I8 to provide protection against inflammable bombs Metal 2l, such as aluminum or its alloys, or any other suitable metal, or nonmetallic substances 22, may be used `to encase the loops. Small metal plates of such material may be use d in garments or sheets for individual protection.

, Since the preferred type of fabric is made of two series of strands 23,. 24, resistant material,v

suchas metal bars 25 and steel wool 26, may be positioned intermediate the loops to provide a. cushioning base against whichl energy will be absorbed as the steel wool compresses and the barsare dis-placed and the loops enlarge at the point of impact.

For many uses the fiatfabric should be fashioned to serve some special purpose t0 better advantage.4 Thus as shown in Fig. 7, a sheet of knitted wire 3| of the type above described isA provided with narrowed ends 32, 33, and marginal separations 34 at spaced points at the sides with front and rear slits 35, 36, lateral slits 31 and a central anti-aircraft flap 38. The slits permit some spreading by wedging action of the fabric, the degree of openingv depending on the length of the slit. Upon the removal of the wedge the fabric is substantially self-closing except for a very narrow space for vision. Where a flap 38 is provided a series of clips vor Wires 39 must be applied. When the protective cover 3| is applied to an automobile, as shown in Fig. 8, only a minimum amount of fastening is required, the end wires 40 being drawn tight after attachment to the front and rear bumpers. The l driver has an adequate degree of vision through .the front and rear Windows, and the spaced slits 31 at the sides permit vision` in each direction in an emergency. The marginal separations 34 allow limited door movement, and wire fastenings to the car fenders running board and body may be provided under certain conditions of high speed travel. Another protective cover 4I may be used within the compartment of the vehicle, as shown in Fig. 10, which also shows fabric used as part of the cabin structure and supported by suitable fastenings. There may be cast plate fabric 42 used as part of the vehicle structure, and if desired two plate layers may be used between which rubber-like, resilient, or self-sealing material 43 may be engaged, as shown, to prevent total destruction of the vehicle when subjected to gun re. Such elastic support for the outer layer of the wall structure will increase the resistance to penetration through a. slight yielding at the time of impact.

The fabric may be usedfinternally as well as externally of the structure to which it is applied, and is especially valuable for emergency police use in handling mobs,or in places Where sniping is expected. It can also be applied to cockpits of airplanes, and to trucks, ambulances, trains, boats, and other vehicles.

The covers shown in Figs. 7 and 10 may also be used for trench protection against strang by low flying aircraft. Simple pole supports 44 may be adequate -to allow the fabric to hang free thereby having enhanced missile deecting capacity. The cover may be set up as an inclined shield supported by suitable props 4-5 as shown in Fig. l1. Annular wire shields 46 or sectional wire shields 41 may be secured to the wheels over the tires.

'Ihe wire fabric used in some instances may be of very small gauge, but of high tensile strength, and in place of using one garment,two garments, or Ya single garment constructedl of double layers of ,such fabric may be used, the outer garment th'en having a sliding action on the under garment at 'the moment of impact of any missiles. For protection of an individual a at flexible knitted wire fabric garment preferably made of close formation may be provided as shown in Fig. 12. The structure embodies a somewhat rectangular lower section which may be of ankle length for general use, in which case a central leg length separation 52 is provided'permitting the body and legs 'to be enclosed and held protected by suitable fastenings. A central extension 53 with lateral wings 54 covers the upper and outer shoulder areas and afurther central extension 55 is provided, fashioned to helmet form56 to engage the head of the individual, and having several slits 51 case the arms, hands and feet may also be encased in the garment structure with all openings carefully fastened.

The bag structure shown in Fig. 2 may be produced in quantities at low cost. For certain areas, as shown in Fig. 14, subject to repeated bombardment such bags or chambers 6I of suitable size and strength may be placed toV entrap the projectile and absorb a large amount of the energy which might be directed toward a vulnerable point of defense. The anchoring of the bags need be only temporary and may incorporate shearpins or springs, as the projectile would carry it along after engagement therewith. Such bags might also be supported on booms adjacent the boilers and magazines of ships to prevent penetration and to reduce the effects of concussion from torpedo attack.

In view of the increasing use of bombing air craft it is desirable to minimize the damage caused to buildings. bridges and streets and public works. Where the installation is justified by the value of the structure or area to be protected, a combined net and explosion chamber may be provided. As shown in Figs. 15 and 16 a central support 10 for a closely woven smooth surfaced wirevnet 'Il is provided and along the lower margins thereof multiple walled wire knitted bags 'I2 are provided. Props `'I3 hold the bag members open in alinement with the inclined net surface. Depending aps 'I4 may loosely close the bag openings until blown to closed position by the explosion with frictional' and the floors 18. The roadways of the cities may v likewise be formed permanently of shock proof for vision, and a depending chest protection area 5B. This structure may be made of light hardened wire fabric, freely flexible and easily put on in an emergency. Felt pads or suitable buffer material can be rst applied to the head and shoulders. The draped support of the fabric permits it to yield to a sufiicient degree to defleet bullets, and the wire is fine mesh and would prevent knife or dagger thrusts. The garment reduced to the body section is adapted for police officers as a bullet proof vest. When asbestos is knitted into the loops of the garment, in the manner shown in Fig, 5, it will serve as a shield for firemen, and gas and oil workers. In such wire mesh 19 of the type described. 'The nets 8l areindependentlysupported in inclined re lation to the buildings and feed into multiple walled upwardly opening bags82. The bags may be anchored byfchimney nets 83 and cables 80, and supported by props 84 and guy wires 85. Bombs and incendiary devices entrapped within the bag would be controlled as to direction and violence of reaction outwardly of such bag enclosures through the muilling andbaiiling effect of the interstices of the bag structure.

The construction shown in Fig. .18 provides for emergency armament of various ships, andfor protection of anti-air craft gunners and for the ships themselves from aerial, missiles. Deck pads 9| of the double layer knitted wire fabric are provided, and plates with metal fabric 92 are placed on the sides to the water line. Other pads are formed as multiple walled bags 93, and thus serve as side 'protection for the ship as well as explosion controlling elements. Torpedo catching bags 94 are supported on booms at vulnerable points. Nets 95 of knitted smooth surfaced wire are suspended flexibly from the masts to divert bombs into the multiple walled,

bags which may have inwardly opening ilaps 96 to further minimize the destructive effects of the explosion.

As has been indicated, the fabric, even when fashioned for special uses may be converted to emergency use for roads, bridges, belt trackways for caterpillar tanks, machine gun nests, emergency towing platforms and the like. The structure of the closely knitted fabric makes it practically indestructible and exceptionally easy to handle in transportation and use.

The protection of bridges from direct hits may be carried out as shown in Fig. 19 wherein inclined wire nets are supported on props |02 or suspended on the superstructure or towers, if any, are present. Booms hold explosion chambers |03 in spaced relation to the sides rendering such explosions less damaging. As stated, shear bolts and springs may be provided to release the explosion chambers when the residual energy not absorbed rises above a predetermined level.

As shown in Fig. 20 especial protection must be provided for docks, canals, locks, warcraft harbors, and the like against which concentrated attack is often directed. In such cases explosion chambers may have to be of heavier gauge and with increased layers in the wall areas. They may be placed at the base of natural slopes with associated missile directing nets |04 above such chambers |05. Towers |06 and cables |01 may also be provided for supporting inclined nets |08 over the structures to be protected, such nets preferably being positioned at an elevation sufiicient to carry the explosive devices to a good distance for entrapment in the explosion chambers |09. 'I'he chambers themselves, while multiwalled, should also be voluminous enough to swing or enlarge with the explosion to a degree before the stress reaches the loop formation and the individual strands. Since a maximum cushioning effect is provided for the shock at an expense which is negligible as compared with the vital necessity for the preservation of key positions or facilities, the continued protection of such points is merely a question of replacement and repair of damaged nets and explosion chambers. By reason of these elements being made of wire or the like in sectional portable units, the removal or salvaging of injured sections is a matter involving little loss of time and practically no interference with other activities.

Other modes of applying the principle of my invention may be employed instead of those explained, change being made as regards the structure herein disclosed, provided the means stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such stated means be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention:

1. A protective device resistant to destruction through shock of impact or explosion, comprising a fabric formed of a plurality of series of strands of resistant wire-like material knitted with loops drawn tight to present relatively smooth surfaces formed by interknitted series of longitudinally extending substantially parallel strands of similarly looped structure on each side.

2. A protective device resistant to destruction through shock of impact or explosion, comprising a wire fabric formed of a plurality of series of strands tightly knitted with relatively smooth surfaces of similarly looped structure on each side.

3. A protective device resistant to destruction through shock of impact or explosion, comprising a wire fabric formed of a plurality of series of strands tightly knitted with relatively smooth surfaces of similarly looped structure on each side, and inserted material engaged between successive rows of loops of such fabric.

4. A protective device resistant to destruction through shock of impact or explosion, comprising a wire fabric formed of a plurality of series of strands tightly knitted with relatively smooth surfaces of similarly looped structure on each side, inserted material engaged between successive rows of loops of such fabric, and integrally formed selvages provided at each lateral margin of the fabric.

5. A fiat knitted fabric adapted to provide a shield against vibration and impact formed of a plurality of series of strands of tightly drawn loops of wire with relatively smooth surfaces of similarly looped structure on each side, with slits and openings incorporated in the body of the fabric at predetermined points, and with the margins of all longitudinal edges salvaged in the course of production and running longitudinally of the fabric strip as knitted.

6, A'ilat knitted fabric adapted to provide a shield against vibration and impact formed of a plurality of series of strands of wire with relatively smooth surfaces of tightly drawn similarly looped structure on each side, and having marginal contours of any desired conformation, with slits and openings of any desired contour incorporated in the body of the fabric at predetermined points, and with margins of all longitudinal edges selvaged in the course of production and running longitudinally of the fabric strip as knitted.

7. A at knittedA fabric adapted to provide a shield against vibration and impact formed of a plurality of series of strands of wire with relatively smooth surfaces of tightly drawn similarly looped structure on each side, with added and subtracted loops to conform the structure to various objects, and with margins oi' all longitudinal edges selvaged in the course of production and running longitudinally of the fabric strip as knitted.

8. A flexible fabric of knitted material highly resistant to impact and penetration having two series of longitudinal substantially parallel strands interknitted and formed as a unit and provided with originally knitted-in side selvages and non-ravelling knotted end margins at right angles thereto.

9. A exible fabric of knitted material highly resistant to impact and penetration formed as a unit of two series of interknitted substantially parallel longitudinal strands and originally knitted-in side selvages and non-ravelling transverse margins respectively at the edges thereof and around all openings therethrough.

10. A fiat knitted structure formed of at least two series of strands of wire with the loops thereof closely drawn and fashioned to conform to the shape of an object to be protected against shock, impact, and penetration, and originally knittedin side selvages and non-ravelling knotted end margins throughout said structure.

11. A fiat knitted structure formed of at least two series of strands of wire with the loops thereof closely drawn and fashioned to conform to the shape of an object to be protected against shock, impact, and penetration, and having openings therethrough at predetermined points, with selvages and non-ravelling margins throughout, and on each of its opposite sides at and aligned loop strand portions on the surface extending in a generally longitudinal direction as produced in the fabric strip as originally knitted.

12. A exible device of knitted wire fabric providing a body with flat sides resistant to impact and penetration formed as a. unit, and with at least one surface oi' its sides hardened to a greater degree than the remainder of the 'body of such structure.

13. A fiat knitted wire structure for the protection of an individual which is formed throughout of fabric with tightly drawn loops from two series of strands and comprises a body member of substantially rectangular outline having centrally of the upper edge at least three projecting areas adapted to form the head and shoulder protection for the individual when folded downwardly. the lateral areas of said body portion being adapted to fold inwardly beneath the arms and protect the body of the individual.

14. A knitted wire structure -formed of series of knitted strands with inner and outer surfaces lying in a substantially nat plane respectively with tightly drawn loops adapted to withstand impact and penetration -by reason of transmitted loop friction distributed over the strand lengths and associated loop structure.

15. A knitted Wire structure formed of two series of strands interknitted with each other and having means interengaged with the loops to increase the resistance of said structure to impact and penetration and with each loop in tightly drawn engagement with companion loops and said interengaged means.

16. A knitted wire structure comprising double warp purl knit loops tightly drawn to :full-seated interengagement and resistant to impact and penetration, and having resistant material encased thereover to increase such resistant characteristics.

17. A knitted wire structure comprising double Warp purl knit loops tightly drawn to full-seated interengagement and resistant to impact and penetration, having resistant material encased thereover to increase such resistant characteristicsts and a support of elastic material beneath the same to cushion impact stresses on said first named material.

18. A device of the character described comprising a flexible inclined surface or shock resistant material in the form of a sheet, and an enclosure at the lower edge oi such sheet and open in the direction of such inclination formed of two lseries of strands interknitted with each other to provide tightly drawn loops and adapted t0 receive an explosive projectile.

19. A device of the character described comprising a exible enclosure having an opening to receive an explosive projectile, such enclosure being formed of a plurality of nested knitted wire chambers formed of two sexies of strands interknitted with each other to provide tightly drawn loops and telescoped within one another.

WILLIAM J. W'ESSEB'JER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2826788 *Aug 13, 1954Mar 18, 1958Graham PhillipCurved barrier
US3491847 *Jun 15, 1967Jan 27, 1970Thomas P AbbottExplosion cover
US3648613 *Nov 4, 1970Mar 14, 1972Arthur CunnBomb blanket
US4375869 *Sep 8, 1980Mar 8, 1983Hatch Gary HProtective covers or enclosures for mailboxes
US4712731 *Jul 22, 1986Dec 15, 1987Gramelspacher George WMail box structure
US4804877 *Feb 9, 1987Feb 14, 1989Harwood Protection Industries Inc.Protective covers for display cases
US4807922 *Sep 8, 1987Feb 28, 1989Glover Ralph SImpact car cover
US4856436 *Jan 25, 1988Aug 15, 1989Jonathan CampbellAutomatically expanding protective cover
US4930832 *Jan 18, 1989Jun 5, 1990Robert SheltonPuncture and tear resistant armored convertible tops for automobiles
US5622121 *Mar 9, 1995Apr 22, 1997Holler; John L.Security cover for jewelry case
US5655462 *Jun 12, 1995Aug 12, 1997Holler; John L.Apparatus and method for fastening a security cover onto a display case
US6161462 *Mar 19, 1999Dec 19, 2000Michaelson; Eric BurtonBulletproof blanket for use with law enforcement vehicles such as police cars
US6240858 *Apr 30, 1999Jun 5, 2001Michael C. MandallPenetration resistant panel
US6254170 *Mar 7, 2000Jul 3, 2001Barry FarmerVehicle door protective device
US7389718 *Jul 12, 2006Jun 24, 2008Carter Gerald DBallistic blanket
US8857309Dec 21, 2007Oct 14, 2014Cyril Maurice WentzelMethod and device for protecting objects against rocket propelled grenades (RPGs)
US20090308238 *Oct 21, 2005Dec 17, 2009Mititech LlcBarrier system for protection against low-flying projectiles
US20100294124 *Dec 21, 2007Nov 25, 2010Nederlandse Organisatie Voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek TrioMethod and device for protecting objects against rocket propelled grenades (rpgs)
US20110123355 *Jul 2, 2009May 26, 2011Edwards LimitedVacuum pump
US20150338193 *May 19, 2015Nov 26, 2015ProTecht, L.L.C.Individual protective blanket for emergencies
WO2008079001A1 *Dec 21, 2007Jul 3, 2008Nederlandse Organisatie Voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek TnoMethod and device for protecting objects against rocket propelled grenades (rpgs)
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/36.2, 296/136.2, 296/19, 428/911, 89/36.4, 114/241, 2/2.5, 118/504, 89/36.16, 66/202, 109/49.5
International ClassificationF41H5/06
Cooperative ClassificationF41H5/06, Y10S428/911
European ClassificationF41H5/06