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Publication numberUS2327346 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1943
Filing dateJul 24, 1940
Priority dateJul 24, 1940
Publication numberUS 2327346 A, US 2327346A, US-A-2327346, US2327346 A, US2327346A
InventorsFuredy Frank
Original AssigneeSunkraft Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Therapeutic lamp
US 2327346 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 24, 1943. F. FUREDY THERAPEUTIC LAMP Filed July 24, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet l 6 n 1 \M; 0 0 3 I R Y 4 62 z mad M E 56 i "z N @m J B J i n A 56 o a j W r i Wu; 0 1 J F J; m 0 4 w 5 m I J 0 I O m WM Aug. 24, 1943. F. FUREDY THERAPEUTIC LAMP Filed July 24, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR: BY. 70/2 Fax/reg! ATTORNEYJ.

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- Patented Aug. 24, 1943 THERAPEUTIC LAMP Frank Furedy, Chicago, 111., assignor to Sun- Kraft, Inc., Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application July 24, 1940, Serial No. 347,257

Claims.

This invention relates to an ultra violet generator or therapeutic lamp.

It is an object of this invention to provide a compact, highly efllcient therapeutic lamp serving as an ultra violet ray generator and as an ozone generator.

A further objector the invention is to provide an ultra violet ray generator or a lamp, or a combined ultra violet and ozone generator, in which the bulb mounting clips or means serve also as electric supply terminals for the bulb and although exposed, will not injure or even shock a person coming in contact with these supply terminals.

A further object of the invention is to provide an ultra violet ray generator in which the lamp bulb or gaseous discharge tube contains no internal electrodes and is mounted in electric terminals supplying electricity to the gas within the tube through the walls of the tube.

A further object of the invention is to provide in a therapeutic lamp of the above stated character a reflector of high efiiciency for an ultra violet lamp bulb or gaseous discharge tube of elongated form.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a therapeutic lamp serving as an ultra violet ray generator and ozone generator capable of energization by a high frequency voltage of relatively low current intensity and wherein the means for supplying this high frequency voltage is mounted in a housing formed by the parts of the lamp which parts also act to electrically shield such current supplying means and are provided with means permitting a circulation of air about such supplying means and through said housing parts.

Applicants invention further has as an important object the provision of lamp mounting means which are inexpensive from a manufacturing standpoint, but provide a great flexibility of adjustment so that the lamp may be readily adjusted to any desired angle and also to any desired elevation within a predetermined range.

Applicant's invention also contemplates the provision in a therapeutic lamp of a pure quartz ultra violet supplying lamp bulb or gaseous dis- --,charge tube and means for selectively controlling the lamp bulb or tube for use as a cold quartz lampsupplying pure ultra violet rays or as a hot quartz lamp supplying ultraviolet rays of longer in wavelength and infra red or heat rays for si-..

. multaneous therapeutic application.

The invention also contemplates inexpensive and efficient means for mounting the heating means in relation to the heat to the lamp.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the followin description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a view in perspective of a cold quartz therapeutic lamp constructed in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view in horizontal section taken along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal section taken substantially along the line 44 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view in vertical section taken along the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged horizontal section taken substantially on the line 66 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary vertical section taken along the line 'l-1 of Fig. 6; v

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary enlarged view taken in horizontal section along the line 8--8 of Fig. 5;

Figs. 9 and 10 are diagrammatic views in e1e vation illustrating the adjustment of the reflector and the lamp bulb mounted therein;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary view in elevation and partly cut away illustrating a hot; and cold quartz lamp embodying the invention;

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary face view in elevation showing a modified form of heater mounting for the lamp;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary view in horizontal section taken along the line l3--|3 of Fig. 12; and

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary view in elevation of another modified form of heater for the lamp.

As shown in Figs. 1 to 10, a therapeutic lamp 2 embodying the invention comprises a base portion 4, a frame 6, an ultra violet lamp bulb 0r gaseous discharge tube 8, a higheiiiciency reflector l0, combined mounting means and electric supply terminals or electrodes I2 and adjustable mounting means M for mounting the reflector l0 and bulb or tube 8 on the frame 6.

The base portion 4 comprises a relatively heavy disc-shaped base casting is having depending ieet l8 formed of suitable cushioning material and secured to the base 16 as by screws 20 threaded into the annular thickened rim 22 of the base plate It. The base portion 4 also comprises a sheet metal shell 24 of frusto-conical shape secured to the base plate It by the frame 6 as will presently appear. The shell 24 and base plate It cooperate to form a housing for the high quartz lamp to supply frequency generating and current supply means 26 and a timing mechanism 28.

The high frequency generating and current supplying means 26-comprises a ballast tube 36 (Figs. 2 and a) a thermionic rectifying diode or thermionic rectifying and voltage doubling duodlode tube 32, a thermionic power amplifier tube 3d, and an air core induction coil 36. The tubes 30, 32 and 3d are mounted upon a sheet metal base 38 fastened in a convenient manner to the base plate I6. The induction coil 36 is connected in an oscillating circuit with the power ampliiier tube 34, and the tube 34 is" connected to the tubes 30 and 32 as described in my co-pending application Serial No. 347,258, filed July 24, 1940, now issued as Patent No. 2,300,916, dated September 25, 1942.

The timing mechanism 28 may be of any suitable conventional character, preferably embodying a simple form of mechanical clock embodying an electric switch that is closed by the setting of the clock and is opened upon the elapsing of a period for which the clock is set. The switch of the timing mechanism 28 is connected in the supply cable or cord 36 to control the supply of power through the plug 2 to the power input socket M of the high frequency current supply means 26.

The output socket 46 of the high frequency current supply means 26 is connected by a plug :38 and wires 56 to a socket 52 secured to the upper wall of the shell 22. A dial plate 56 for the timing mechanism 26 is mounted in a cit-- cular groove formed by a depressed portion 56 of the upper wall 5 3 of the shell 24 and is fastened to the shell as by the-screws 66 which also fasten the timing mechanism to the shell. The time setting shaft 62 of the timing mechanism 26 extends through openings in the wall portion 58 of the shell and in the dial plate 56 and at its outer end carries an operating knob 64 formed with a pointer portion 66 for cooperation with the indicla on the dial plate 56.

The base plate It is provided with a plurality of angularly spaced openings 68 of which there may be any desired number, which form air inlet passages into the base portion A. The upper wall 54 of the shell 24 is formed with a plurality of struck-up portions or louvres l0 which form ventilating openings or air outlet passages 12 cooperating with the air inlet passages 68 to provide means for permitting a sufilciently rapid circulation of air sumciently large in volume to dissipate the heat supplied by the inherent heating efiect of the tubes 30, 32 and 3 3 and to maintain the shell 36 in a relatively cool condition.

The shell 24 not only cooperates with the base to form a housing for the high frequency generating or current supply means 26 and the timing mechanism 28, but also being of sheet metal, acts as an electrical shield minimizing radio interierence efiects of the supply means 26 which generates currents of approximately 550' kilocycles. It has been found that the shell 24 acting as an electrical shield so minimizes radio interference effects of the current supply means 26 that such effects are only slightly noticeable even in the same house circuit in which the lamp 2 is connected and are not noticeable in radio receiving sets connected in other house circuits or placed any appreciable distance from the lamp 2.

duced free end portions 8t (Fig. 5') of the legs 76 and 76 pass through openings in the upper wall 5d of the shell 2% and through countersunk openings in the base plate l6. Suitable fastening means as nuts 82 on the free ends of the legs It and i6 secure the frame 6 to the base plate I6. The frame 6 also serves to fasten the shell as to the base plate I6 where the reduced portions 66 of the legs id and l6 form shoulders 66 overlying retaining washers 86 interposed between the shoulders and the upper wall 56 of the shell 24.

The ultra violet lamp or gaseous discharge tube 8 comprises an electrodeless pure quartz ultra violet ray transmitting envelope 88 exhausted to a relatively high vacuum; filled with mercury vapor; small quanti ies of argon, helium, krypton and neon gases, a ziiobule 90 (Fig. 2) of mercury and then sealed 0%., It will be seen that the bulb or tube 8 has no internal electrodes and hence may be termed electrodeless.

High frequency voltage which activates or energizes the vapor and gas within the tube is applied to the tube by the combined mounting means and terminals or external electrodes I2. Excitation of the lamp being by a high frequency voltage of relatively low current, a person will receive no shock by touching the electrodes. The combined mounting means and terminals I2 comprise a pair of spaced, generally U-shaped spring metal clips having opposed resilient legs 92 (Fig. 6) and an interconnecting base or mounting portion 941. The terminals I2 are mounted on a sheet metal channel 96 by bolts 98, insulating strips 9'? and insulating bushings I00; the bushings I00 insulating the terminals I2 from the channel 96, the strips 91 insulating the screws 96 from the channel 96 and the screws 98 forming means for connecting the wires IOI which pass between the strips W to the terminals l2. In the form shown in Figs. 1 to 10, the legs 92 of each terminal I2 are formed with outwardly pressed portions I02 having their concave sides facing inwardly so that the legs 92 snugly embrace and frictionally grip the lamp bulb or tube 8 as shown in Fig. 6. Inwardly pressed portions Hi l having their convex sides facing inwardly are formed in the legs 92 of the terminals I2 above the portion I02 in the case of the upper terminal and below the portion I02 in the case of the lower terminal so as to overlie the rounded end of the envelope 88 and positively hold the lamp bulb or tube against longitudinal movement.

The terminals l2 mount the lamp bulb or discharge tube in the reflector I0 which comprises superposed elongated sheet metal members I06 of parabolic form in cross-section, the inner member being provided, as by chromium plating, with a highly reflecting internal surface I08. Top and bottom sheet metal caps H6 and H2 of parabolic form are provided with edge flanges H4 and H6 respectively to snugly embrace and receive the upper and lower edges of the member I06. If desired, the flanges H4 and H6 may be welded to the outer surface of the member H16. The forward free edges of the outer memher I 06 are crimped or bent inwardly as at I I8 to provide a smooth edge; to secure the members I [I6 together; and for interlocking with the inturned edge flanges I20 of the caps I I6 and H2 to hold the reflector parts in assembled relation.

The channel 96 which carries the bulb or tube mounting means and terminals 52 and receives the wires I02 is positioned within the reflector member I66 centrally thereof and is fastened to the reflector member as by the screws 2) that also fasten a handle I24 to the member I88. The channel 88 preferably the full length of the reflector member abuts the end caps H8 and H2. The face of this channel member 88 is preferably chromium plated or otherwise provided with a high reflecting surface for the forward reflecting of the ultra violet rays received through the rear portion of the quartz envelope 88 of the lamp bulb or tube 8.

If desired, the channel 86 may be formed as an integral part with the reflector member I86 and the rearwardly opening channel thus formed closed by a separate piece or strip.

The adjustable mounting means I4 for the lamp bulb or tube 8 and its reflector I8 comprises a pair of elongated parallel straps or bars I26 and I 28 pivotally secured at their upper ends to the frame 6 as by cap screws I38 and I32 respectively which are received in and clamp the sockets I34 and I38 to the legs I4 and I8 oi. the frame 6.

The cap screws I38 and I32 also secure a frame re-enforcing strap I38 to the sockets I34 and I36. The strap I38 is preferably of metal and of inverted U-shape in configuration. The transverse portion I48 of the strap I38 is bowed as shown in Fig. 2 to embrace the cross bar portion I8 of the frame 6. The strap I38 also serves to prevent rotation of the cap screws I 38 and I32 as the straps I26 and I28 are pivoted on these screws to adjust the reflector to different positions. This resistance to turning of the cap screws I38 and I32 is of course achieved by reason of the frictional binding of the heads of the screws against the strap I38. The cap screws I38 and I32 which are pointed (Fig. 8) are of course drawn up sufliciently to clamp the sockets I34 and I36 to the upright legs of the frame 6 and to frictionally bind the straps I26 and I28 in I22 12. reflector extends I88 and forward every adjusted position.

The reflector I8 is disposed between the parallel straps or bars I26 and I28 and is pivotally connected thereto for rotatable adjustment about a horizontal axis at any desired angle relative to the bars I26 and I28. The means for forming this pivotal connection comprises a rod I42 (Fig. '7 received in bushings I44 and I46 carried by the bars I26 and I28. The bushings I44 and I48 are mounted in aligned openings adjacent the lower ends of the bars I26 and I28 and are secured thereto as by upsetting or peening over the outer edges of the bushings. A reflector mounting member I48 of substantially rectangular shape in cross-section is fastened to the cap member I I2 of the reflector I4 in any convenient manner, as by welding. This rectangular reflector mounting member I48 extends between the parallel bars I26 and I28 and is journalled on the inwardly extending portions of the bushings I44 and I46. Knurled thumb nuts I58 and I52 are received on the opposite threaded end portions of the rod I42 and serve to frictionally clamp the parallel bars I28 and I28 against the opposite edges of the reflector mounting member .I48 so that this mounting member and the re-' flector carriedthereby may be adjusted as desired about the axis of the rod I42 and frictionally held in ever'y'adjusted position. The threadedopening in. one of the thumb nuts as for example, the thumb nut I82, may extend entirely therethrough so as to permit this adjusting thumb nut to be drawn up to any desired degree.

lines the manner in which the parallel mounting ,bars I28 and I28 may be adjusted about the comand the tube may be rotatably adjusted about of swing of the bars I36 vatlon of the reflector the axis of the rod I42 to different angles relative to the parallel bar I 26 and I28.

It will be further evident that by manipulation of the handle I24, the reflector and tube may be rotated through the complete range of 360 degrees about the axis of the rod I42 so that the rays from the lamp bulb or tube may be directed upwardly or downwardly, forwardly or back-' wardly, or at any desired angle between these positions as may be most convenient for treatmentof the patient or object. It will also be evident'that the mounting bars I26 and I28 may be adjusted through a range approximating 360 degrees. In an actual construction this range of swing of the bars I26 and I28 with the sockets I34 and I36 positioned as shown in Fig. 1 equals about 338 degrees. By loosening the cap screws I38 moved downwardly of the frame 6 and the angle 'further increased as desired. This permissible adjustment of the sockets I34 and I36 on the frame 6 also permits a very wide latitude of vertical adjustment in eleand its parallel mounting bars.

Figs. 9 and 18- illustrate in full and dotted 78 lower ends a plug I56 by which said From the above it will be seen that by reason oi. the reflector mounting means in which the lamp bulb or tube is carried, a great flexibility of adjustment is provided to position the bulb or tube and its reflector at practically any desired elevation or angle. For angular adjustment about a vertical axis, the entire structure may or course be shifted on its supporting surface about such an axis. The base plate I6 of the frame structure may be provided with a central threaded opening I54 for mounting on the upright column of a floor stand provided with mating threads at the upper end oi the column.

As shown in Fig. 2', the wires I8i which pass bottom plate II2 of the reflector carry at their wires may be connected to the socket 62. These wires I82 may be of any suitable fine, well-insulated wire of high flexibility and are preferably maintained 'in spaced relation by spacing pieces of insulating material which prevent twisting of the wires about each other and minimize electro-magnetic interaction between the wires. These wires are of course of suflicient length to permit the reflector and the bulb or tube carried therein to be adjusted to any of its manifold possible positions relative to the frame 6.

The clips I2, having a high frequency voltage applied thereacross, produce a copious supply of ozone and this is enhanced by the 'ozonizing action of the rays.

As shown in'Fig. 11, the cold quartz lamp of Figs. 1 to 10 may be converted into a selectively hot or cold quartz lamp by one or more sets of heating elements I68 preferably composed of coils of flne nichrome wire, which coils snugly embrace and I32, the'sockets I34 and I36 Indy be may be mounted in annular recesses in the inner surface of a cap I62 fitting the end of the quartz envelope 88. The cap I62 may be of metal or of insulating material. If of metal, it is preferably of one having a relatively low coefllcient of heat conductivity so that while a relatively large quantity of infra red or heat rays may irradiate from the cap, it is suinciently non-conductive of heat to permit the proper heating f the quartz envelope 88 necessary to ,the go eratlon and transmission of rays characteristic of a hot quartz lamp. If the cap 52 becomposed of insulating material, it is preferably of Bakelite or ceramic substance so that substantially all of the power of the heating element is utilized to heat the quartz envelope 88. Terminals I64 for the sets of heating elements H60 extend through the rear of the caps I62 and are connected directly or by short leads to terminal screws or members I66 mounted on the channel 96 and insulated therefrom as by insulating bushings similar to the bushings I (Figs. 2 and 6) The terminals lfit of the upper and lower sets of heating elements are connected in parallel by wires I68 passing through the channel 96 and carrying a plug Ill! by which the wires may be connected to a power supply socket H2 mounted in the shell 25 and secured to the upper wall 54 thereof. The power supply socket I72 may be connected to the supply cable or cord til through a control switch lit and the switch of the timing mechanism 28 as described in my previously mentioned co-pending application so that upon closing of this switch lit, the heating elements Hit are energized under the control of the switch of the timing mechanism 28 and the lamp may then be used as a hot quartz lamp. Upon opening of the manual switch I'M, the circuit to the sets of heating elements I60 will be broken as described in said co-pending application so that the lamp may be used as a cold quartz lamp providing a source rich in substantially pure ultra violet rays, that is a source reached in ultra violet rays of 2537 Angstrom units.

As shown in Figs. 12 and 13, the sets of heating elements IIB which are. preferably composed of line nichrome Wire in elongated helixes are received in forwardly opening recesses I78 formed in an elongated mounting member I80 of generally semi-cylindrical configuration and provided with opposed lateral wings I82. Rearwardly projecting stud portions I86 receive mounting screws (not shown) by which the mounting member I30 is fastened to the channel member 96. The sets of heating elements I15 are connected in series and current is supplied thereto through leads I86 which connect the heating element to terminal screws similar to the terminal screws I66 and similarly mounted on the channel member 98. It will be seen that with the heating elements mounted as shown in Figs. 12 and 13 in the mounting member I80 which may, like the caps I62, be formed of metal or insulating material, the heating means supplies a relatively large quantity of infra red or heat rays as well as a sulficiently large amount of heat for causin the lamp bulb or discharge tube 8 to operate as a hot quartz lamp.

In the form shown in Fig. 14, the heater coil I88 is wound as a helix directly upon the envelope 88 of the lamp and is connected at its opposite ends to terminal screws I90 mounted similarly to the terminal screws I66.

It will be apparent from the foregoing description that applicant has provided a compact, highly efllclent therapeutic lamp serving as an ultra violet ray generator and as an ozone generator.

'Applicant has also provided an ultra violet ray generator or lamp, or a combined ultra violet and ozone generator, in which the bulb mounting clips or means serve also as electric supply terminals for the bulb and although exposed, will not injure or even shock a person coming in contact with these supply terminals.

Applicant's invention also provides an ultra violet ray generator in which the lamp bulb or gaseous discharge tube contains no internal electrodes and is mounted in electric terminals supplying electric energy for excitation of the gas within the tube through the walls of the tube.

The invention has also provided in a therapeutic lamp of the above-stated character a reflector of high emciency for an ultra violet lamp bulb or gaseous discharge tube of elongated form.

Applicant has also provided a therapeutic lamp "serving as an ultra violet ray generator and ozone generator capable of energization by a high frequency voltage of relatively low current intensity and wherein the means for supplying this high frequency voltage is mounted in a housing formed by the parts of the lamp which parts also act to electrically shield such current supplying means and are provided with means permitting a circulation of air about such supplying means and through said housing parts.

Applicant has further provided a lamp mounting means which is inexpensive from a manufacturing standpoint, but provides a great flexibility of adjustment so that the lamp may be readily adjusted to any desired angle and also to any desired elevation within a predetermined range. 1

Applicants invention has also provided in a therapeutic lamp a pure quartz ultra violet supplying lamp bulb or gaseous discharge tube and means for selectively controlling the lamp bulb or tube for use .as a cold quartz lamp providing a source rich in pure ultra violet rays, or as a hot quartz lamp providing less pure ultra violet rays or longer wave length and infra red or heat rays for simultaneous therapeutic application.

The invention has further provided inexpensive and efiicient means for mounting the heating means in relation to the quartz lamp to supply heat to the lamp bulb.

it is obvious that various changes may be made in the speclnc embodiments or the invention set tube having a quartz envelope and adapted to provide ultra-violet rays, means ror supplying current to said tune to produce ultra-violet rays n one wave length band, means i'or producing infra-red rays, said infra-red ray producing means belng positioned in relation to the tube envelope to heat the quartz envelope or the tube whereby to change the rays transmitted through tne quartz envelope of the tube to ultra-violet rays of longer wave length.

2. In a therapeutic lamp, a gaseous discharge tube having a quartz envelope and adapted to provide ultra-violet rays. means for supplying current to said tube to produce ultra-violet rays of one wave length band, means for heating the envelope of said tube for changing the rays transmitted through the quartz envelope to ultra-violet rays of longer wave length, common timing means for controlling the energization of said heating means and said tube, and means for controlling the deenergization of the heating means selectively and independent of said timing means.

3. In an ultra-violet ray generator, an electrodeless, gaseous discharge tube, a base, a metal reflector for receiving said tube, combined voltage supplying and mounting terminals carried by the reflector and adapted to contact the tube externally, a support for the reflector and fastened to the base, a high frequency, thermionic tube voltage generating device upon said base and connected to said terminals, and means forming a housing upon said base for enclosing said device, said housing means being of sheet metal to provide a high frequency electric shield to minimize transmission of radio interfering, high frequency currents.

4. In an ultra-violet ray generator, an elongated, gaseous discharge tube, a base, a frame fastened to the base, a reflector adjustably mounted on said frame, said reflector comprising an elongated sheet metal shell of generally parabolic configuration in cross-section and having an inner reflecting surface, resilient clips mounted in the bottom of said reflector shell in spaced relation longitudinally of the shell and adapted to clamp the tube externally, and means mounted on the base and connected to said clips for supplying high frequency energizing current to said tube.

5. In a therapeutic lamp, a gaseous discharge tube having a quartz envelope, means for supplying current to said tube to operate the tube as a cold quartz ultra-violet ray generator emitting rays of one wave length band, and means for heating the quartz envelope of said tube to cause the tube to operate as a hot quartz ultraviolet ray generator emitting rays of a different wave length band and including ultra-violet rays of longer wave length than in the first band.

6. An ultra-violet ray generator comprising an elongated reflector shell of generally parabolic configuration in cross section, and closed at its opposite ends, an elongated ultra-violet ray tube, means for supplying current to said tube, said means comprising lead-in wires extending along the bottom of the reflector shell, a channelshaped member overlying said wires to house the same, a pair of resilient clips mounted on said channel-shaped member and connected within the channel-shaped member to said lead-in wires, said clips being constructed to detachably receive and resiliently clamp said tube, said clips having portions engaging the ends of the tube to prevent longitudinal movement of the tube in the clips.

7. An ultra-violet ray generator comprising an elongated reflector shell, an ultra-violet ray tube, means for supplying current to said tube and comprising lead-in wires extending longitudinalLv of the shell, lamp receiving members mounted in said shell and spaced longitudinally thereof to mount the tube in the shell, connections between said members and said lead-in wires whereby said members also serve as supply terminals for said tube, a generally U-shaped mounting standard for said shell, a link positioned between said legs and pivoted at one end adjacent the cross piece of the U-shaped standard, said link being pivotally connected at its other end to said shell, the legs of said U-shaped standard being spaced apart by said cross piece sufliciently to accommodate the shell and the link therebetween, the pivoted link permitting swinging of the shell through the standard from one side to the other in various angular positions with relation to the plane of the standard.

8. An ultra-violet ray generator comprising a base, a frame of generally inverted U-shape in elevation and mounted on said base, a pair of links pivoted at corresponding ends to the legs of the frame and adapted to extend parallel to said frame legs, an elongated reflector shell of general parabolic configuration in cross section, means pivoting said shell to the other corresponding ends of said links, said links and said shell being positioned between said frame legs and said frame legs being spaced apart sufficiently to accommodate said links and said shell for angular adjustment to either side of said frame and parallel to said frame legs and at various angles to the plane of said legs.

9. In an ultra-violet ray generator, a base, a frame of generally inverted U-shape in elevation and mounted on said base, a high frequency supply circuit including high frequency generating elements mounted on said base, a sheet metal housing for said elements secured to said base and having openings therein in which the legs of said frame extend, an elongated reflector shell positioned ,between the legs of said frame, a supporting member for said shell positioned between said frame legs, means pivoting said member to one of said frame legs, means spaced longitudinally of the frame from said first pivoting means for pivoting said shell to said member, an electrodeless ultra-violet tube, supply leads extending from said supply means within said housing, through said housing, and along the bottom of said shell, resilient clips for receiving and clamping said tube and supplying high frequency current thereto, a member extending longitudinally of said shell in the bottom thereof for housing said supply leads,- and means for mounting said clips on said housing member in spaced relation longitudinally of said shell.

10. In a therapeutic lamp, an electrodeless, elongated, gaseous discharge tube adapted to provide therapeutic rays, an elongated, generally semi-cylindrical reflector, lead-in wires extending along the internal surface of the reflector, means forming with said surface of the reflector a housing for said wires, and tube mounting terminals connected to said wires, said terminals being carried by said housing means and projecting inwardly of the reflector from said means and spaced longitudinally of the reflector.

FRANK FUREDY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425297 *Oct 24, 1942Aug 12, 1947Sun Kraft IncLamp circuit
US2510017 *Jun 8, 1946May 30, 1950Sun Kraft IncRadio-frequency oscillator for ultraviolet ray generators
US2551319 *Dec 29, 1947May 1, 1951Eiklid ArvidIrradiating apparatus
US2586625 *Jun 8, 1948Feb 19, 1952Downey Virgil MApparatus for treating materials by ultraviolet radiation
US2613328 *Jul 14, 1950Oct 7, 1952Inst Divi Thomae FoundationLamp
US2625670 *Oct 1, 1948Jan 13, 1953Inst Divi Thomae FoundationUltraviolet lamp
US2715675 *Aug 17, 1951Aug 16, 1955Michel E MacksoudPortable lamp structure
US3084258 *Aug 17, 1959Apr 2, 1963Furedy FrankTherapeutic lamp
US3223826 *Sep 25, 1961Dec 14, 1965Jr Michael MacalusoLamp stand
US5746505 *Feb 16, 1996May 5, 1998Mita Industrial Co., Ltd.Electrical conductor for an optical system
DE19702987A1 *Jan 28, 1997Jul 30, 1998Pierre Nicolas Dr Med FossIrradiation instrument
EP0004370A2 *Mar 20, 1979Oct 3, 1979Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft für elektrische Glühlampen mbHIrradiation device, particularly home solarium
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/495.1, 315/246, 607/94, 607/88, 250/504.00R, 315/115, 315/85, 362/263, D24/210
International ClassificationA61N5/08
Cooperative ClassificationA61N5/06
European ClassificationA61N5/06