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Publication numberUS2328110 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1943
Filing dateMar 14, 1941
Priority dateMar 14, 1941
Publication numberUS 2328110 A, US 2328110A, US-A-2328110, US2328110 A, US2328110A
InventorsArthur R Peat, Parke H Thompson
Original AssigneeAmp Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage dispensing apparatus
US 2328110 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 31, 1943.

P. H. THOMPSON :1- AL 2,328,110

BEVERAGE DISPENSING APPARATUS Filed March 14, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 mvmoRs PARKE HTHOMPSON BY ARTHUR R. PEAT Aug. 31, 1943. P. H. THOMPSON ET AL 2,328,

v BEVERAGE DISPENSING APPARATUS Filed March 14, 1 941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG.2.

IIHII INVENTORS PAR KE H. THoM PSON ARTHUR R. PEAT ATTORNEY Patented ng. 31, 1943 2,328,116 BEVERAGE DISPENSING APPARATUS Parke 11. Thompson, Glendale, and Arthur R. Peat, Webster Groves, Mo., assignors to AMP Corporation, St. Louis, Mo., agcorporation of Missouri Applicatlonlvlarch 14, 1941, Serial No. 383,256

9 Claims. This invention relates generally to beverage dispensing apparatus and, more particularly, to

a certain new and useful improvement in apparatus especially adapted for mixing and dispensing a syrup-flavored carbonated beverage.

In recent years, retail soft drink dispensing agencies, such as soda-fountainsand the like, have found the sales of certain particular drinks sufliciently heavy to justify the installation of special equipment for simultaneously dispensing a measured quantity of syrup and carbonated water directly into the serving glass in a single operation. Ordinarily, this type of equipment employs some form of receptacle provided with a worm and a syrup reservoir, both of which discharge through valve mechanism, the interior of the container being packed with ice for cooling the syrup and the carbonated wa- Existing apparatus of this type, however, is subject to several outstanding disadvantages.

By reason of the fact that. valves capable of being immersed in melting ice or other liquid cooling medium are prohibitively expensive, it has been necessary to resort to externally mounted valves. External valve structures, however, are

usually warm and cause disproportionate mixing of thesyrup and carbonated ,water, in part due to the changes in the viscosity of the syrup resulting from the change in temperature and in part due to the escape of gaseous carbon-dioxide from the carbonated water. Furthermore, due to changes in viscosity and head pressure of the syrup, the quantity of syrup dispensed with each drink varies, making it practically impossible to attain the desired uniformity. We have further found that, with existing types ofdispensing apparatus, it is extremely difficult to maintain the carbonated water and syrup at substantially the same temperature for dispensing.

Our invention, hence, has for its primary objects the provision of dispensing apparatus which is extremely economical in cost of construction, as well as in operation and maintenance, which is capable of dispensing carbonated beverages uniformly, accurately preserving any desired ratio, between flavoring syrup and carbonatedwater, which maintains the syrup and carbonatedwater. at substantially precisely the same temperature, which is self-refrigerated and need not be packed periodically with ice or any other refrigerant, which maintains a substantially constant head pressure on the stored syrup, which employsa unique form of internal dispensing valve mechanism maintained at the same temperature as the syrup and carbonated water, and which is highly emcient in the performance of its stated functions.

And with the above and other objects in view, our invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arrangement, and combination of parts presently described and pointed out in the claims,

In the accompanying drawings (two sheets)- Figure 1 is a' diagrammatic view of an installed carbonated beverage dispensing apparatus' constructed in accordance with and embodying our present invention;

Figure 2 is a transverse sectional view of the apparatus or mechanism taken approximately along the line 2-2, Figure 1; and

Figures 3 and 4 are longitudinal sectional views of the mechanism taken approximately along the lines 3-3 and 4-4, respectively, Figure 2.

Referring now in more detail and by reference characters to the drawings, which illustrate a preferred embodiment of our invention, A designates a combination carbonating and refrigerating mechanism adapted for continuously'refrig erating and carbonating water and constantly recirculating the refrigerated and carbonatedwater through'the system substantially as described in our co-pending application, Serial No. 355,635, filed September 6, 1940. The refrigerating carbonator A, however, differ from the apparatus of such co-pending application only in employing a carbonating vessel I, which is mounted by suitablebrackets 2 in superposed co-axial alignment with a compressor 3, so that the recirculating pump 4 may be driven from a vertically disposed extension 5 of the main compressorshaft. In addition, a separate motor-driven injector pump 5 is employed to draw the fresh water into the system from the Buhrstone filter 1, forcing the water through the inlet or supply line 8 and through the check-valve 8 into the intake leg Ill and thence into thecarbonating vessel I.

Provided for co-operation with the refrigerating carbonator A, is a conventional tank or cylindex of carbondioxide B connected through a pressure reducing control valve II and check valve l2 to the intake leg ll. Leading from the carbonating vessel l, is a charged liquid supply line it and a charged-liquid return line l4 for circulating the cold carbonated liquid through one or more dispensing faucets IS in the formation of a recirculatory system, asshown in Figure 1.

Provided for connection in the recirculatory system, is a mixed beverage dispenser C comprising a preferably rectangular insulated housing IG- having a tight-fitting cover or lid ill. Supported within the housing It by means ofa horizontally disposed shelf I8, is a substantially rectangular container shell I9 provided with a tight-fitting removable lid 20, which is accessible from the top of the housing l6 when the cover I! thereof is removed. Marginally welded or otherwise fixed upon the inner face of the container shell l9 below the plane of -'the mouth thereof, is a downwardly curved annular flange 2|, and removably disposed within and supported by the flange 2 l ,is an inverted flask or bottle 22 of somewhat frusto-pyramidal shape having a centrally positloned'fidownwardly opening mouth as. It should be noted in this connection that the flask '22 is of such height that, when disposed in inverted position within the container shell l9, the mouth 23 will be spaced upwardly a short distance from the bottom wall of the container shell 12, all as best seen in Figure 3 and for purposes presently fully appearing.

Fixed in and extending through the bottom wall 24 and disposed adjacent the front wall 25 of the housing It, is a preferably cylindrical valve-body 28, which has a reduced extension projecting below the bottom wall 24 and longitudinally bored toprovide discharge nozzles 2'| and 28, the latter being partially obliquely'continued, as shown, so that its mouth is approximately angularly presented toward and offset downwardly from the mouth of the adjacent nozzle 21.

Interiorly, the valve-body 26 is formed with syrup-discharge and syrup-intake chambers '29, ,30, respectively axially separated by a wall 3! having a valve-seat-forming orifice 32, and the former leading into and being practically a continuation of the nozzle 28. v

Also formed in the valve=body 26 in upwardly spaced relation to the syrup-intake chamber 30 and separated therefrom by means of a wall 23, is a syrup-intake duct 34 having-communication with the syrup-intake chamber 30 by means of a valve-seat-forming orifice 35 in the wall 23.

The duct 24 extends across the valve-body 28 and opens upon the side face thereof to receive one end of a stainless steel tube 34, which, in turn, extends through the bottom wall of the syrup container shell I! for conveying syrup in glze syrup-intake chamber I! of the-valve-body ilhe valvebody is further formed" with axially spaced charged-liquid discharge and intake chambers 31, 24, adapted for communication through a valve-seat-forming oriflce ll formed in a transversely disposed separating wall 40, and theformer being substantially a part or the nozzle 21. At its upper end, the charged-liquid intake chamber 34 opens into a charged-liquid intake duct 4i which extends transversely across the valve-body 24 to open upon a side face thereof for receiving a' charged-liquid inlet pipe 42, which, in turn, extends horizontally over the bottom of the housing It and is then bent upwardly, as at 42', against the outwardly presented side face of thecontainer shell II, to and upon which the pipe 42 is welded in a series of sinuous or somewhat V-shaped bends in the formation of a heat exchange section 42, which eventually extends downwardly through the bottom wall 2 of the housing It and communicates throu h a valve-body 26, is a charged liquid control handle upwardly through the syrup-intake chamber 30- Similarly, at some suitable point within its length, the charged-liquid supply line 42 is' provided with an oflE-take 46, which extends through the bottom wall 24 and communicates through a suitable coupling 41 with the charged-liquid supply line l3. In this connection, it maybe noted that the couplings-44, 41, may be so arranged as to interpose the beverage dispenser C in series with one or more dispensing faucets, spigots, or the like I5 conventionally employing charged-water, or, if desired, may be connected directly to the carbonator A, as shown in dotted lines in Figure 1. r

Extending vertically through the upper portion, and opening at their upper end upon the top face, of the valve-body 26, is a pair of spaced parallel bores 48, 49, respectively disposed in axial alignment with the syrup-discharge and chargedliquid-discharge chambers 31, 28, and disposed tended, as at 56, 51, to slidably fit in thimbles v I58, 59, threadedly seated in the upper end of the bores 48, 49, as best seen in-Figure 4. Coiled on the stems 50, 5|, intermediate the heads, 55, and conventional pacliing nuts 60, Si, threadedly seated in the lower end of the bores 48, 49, for endwise compressive engagement with packing rings 82, are suitable compression springs 63, 64.

Formed preferabh integrally upon the upper face of the valve-body 28, is a pair of spaced upstanding ears 65 for supporting a pivot-pin 66, swingably upon which and extending over the 61 engageable along its under face with the proiecting end of the valve stem extension 58 and suitably provided within its length with a relatively large clearance aperture 68 for freely accommodating the valve stem extension 81.

Independently pivoted upon the pin 86 and extending in spaced relation over the syrup-control handle 61, is a syrup control handle 68 engageable upon its under face with the upper end of the valve stem extension I! and provided with 9. depending lug IQ, for. endwise abutting engagement with the upper face of the syrup control handle 81, all as best seen in Figure 4 and for purposes presently fully appearing. I

Opening to and upon the under face otthe valve-body 28 and disposed in axial alignment with the orifice 25 of the syrup-intake duct 34, is a bore ll threaded at its upper end for adjustably receiving a valve stem 12, which extends and is provided with a valve-plug 18 for engagementwith'the wall 32 for closing the orifice 35. The valve stem 12 extends conventionally through a packing ring 14 and packing nut 15 disposed within the bore Ii and projects a short distance beyondthe under face ofthe valve-body 26, as

p 2,328,110 shown, the stem 12 at its outer end being preferably provided with a diametral slot 16 for receiving a screw driver or other adjusting tool, not shown.

' In use and operation, the carbonator A will continuously generate a large quantity of highly carbonated chilled liquid and recircuiate the same through the recirculatory system, substantially as described in our said co-pending appli cation, the chilled charged-liquid continuously recirculating through the heat exchange tubing 43, 45, of the beverage dispensing apparatus and serving as a: cooling medium for maintaining the syrup within the container shell l9 and the valve-body 26 at the identical temperature of the charged-liquid or carbonated water in the system.

Meanwhile, the flask 22, having been filled with syrup of the desired flavor, is inverted and set within the syrup-containing shell I8, as shown in Figure 3., The syrup will flow downwardly out of the flask 22 into the lower portion of the container shell l9 and through the tube. 36, chamber 34, and orifice 35 into the syrup-intake chamber 36 of the valve 26 until the level of syrup within the container shell I 8 rises above the downwardly presented opening of the flask mouth 23. The

pressure equalizing air flow into the interior of the flask 22 will thus be out off and the downward flow of syrup suspended; When a'suificient quantity of syrup has been withdrawn from the container shell l8 to'lower the syrup level ently of the handle 69, thus opening only the' valve orifice 38 ,and dispensingpure unflavored carbonated water into the nozzle 21.

By reason of the fact that the flow of coldinconvenience resulting from the periodic necessity for packing crushed ice into the dispensing apparatus and also eliminating the existence of a temperature differential between the syrup and charged-liquid which results when a substantial portion of the ice has melted and the temperature in different zones of .the apparatus varies.

therein and again permit access of air to the interior of the flask 22, the syrup will again flow out of the flask 22 until the normal liquid level in the container shell I9 is restored. It will thus be evident that the hydrostatic head causing the syrup to flow outwardly through the valve 26 will be substantially constant. I

When it is desired to dispense a drink, the U per handle 69 is pressed downwardly, carrying with it the lower handle 61, thus shifting both valve stems 50, 6|, downwardly and unseatin both valve plugs 52, 53. Thereupon, the carbonated water will flow outwardly from the discharge chamber 31 into the nozzle 21. Simultaneously syrup will flow from the discharge chamber 29 into the nozzle 28 and be intermixed with the carbonated water as the two fluids are discharged from the respective lower ends 01. the nozzles 21, 28.

To adjust, the rate of flow of syrup, by application of a screw driver or other suitable tool, the valve stem 12 may be conveniently adjusted to shift the valve plug 13 either toward or away from the orifice 35. Accordingly, it will be evident that the rate of syrup flow through the valve-body 26 may thus be regulated and controlled, sothat the proper volumetric ratio between syrup and charged-liquid may be maintained as long as both handles 61, 69, are held down by the operator. In this connection, it should be noted that this constantly maintained ratio enables the dispensation of any size drink without additional manipulation. The glass, cup, or other receptacle is merely filled to the desired point and the handles 61, 68, are released to shut ofl' flow of both syrup and charged-liquid, the dispensed beverage, irrespective of the size of the glass or other receptacle, always having the desired syrup concentration.

If it should be desired to dispense only the charged-liquid without any added syrup, the handle 61 may be manually depressed independ- The constancy and uniformity of temperature in the valve-body 26, syrup-container shell l9, and charged-liquid supply lines 42, 43, 45, further eliminate any undue loss of carbonation by way of flashgas'as the combined syrup and liquid v leaves the dispensing nozzle 28. Even though inaccurate thermost'atic control of the refrigerating mechanism or other uncontrolled cause should result in fluctuations in the'temperature of the charged-liquid, the temperature of the syrup would correspondingly change, so that the charged-liquid and syrup would be dispensed at" a substantially identical temperature. Thus, if

the temperature of the charged-liquid rises for a.

short period of time above the predetermined optimum temperature, such temperature-rise will immediately be communicatedto the syrup. Obviously such a rise in temperature will increase the discharge pressure of the carbonated liquid, so that, when the valve is open, the r'ateof flow thereof is increased. Since, however, the syrup is also warmer, its viscosity will be correspondingly lowered and its rate of flow through the orifice 36 will be correspondingly increased, so that even'under such accidental or abnormal conditions, the dispensed beverage-drink will continue to have substantially the desired syrup concentration. Contrariwise, if, under accidental or other abnormal circumstances, the temperature of the charged-liquid should drop for, a short period of 1 time, so that the discharge pressure and attendant rate of flow is correspondingly lowered, the temperature of the syrup also is lowered and the viscosity thereof increased, so that the rate of syrup flow is accordingly diminished, thus dispensing a fdrink-which will have substantially the desired syrup concentration.

It is to be understood that the word "syrup or phrase "flavoring syrup as employed by us in this. specification and in the appended claims as designating the liquid or material to be mixed with the circulating liquid is to be broadly interpreted as including any suitable flavoring or additive material that is to be, or may be, mixed with the circulating liquid, and that changes and modifications in the form, construction, arrangement, and combination of the several parts of the beverage dispensing apparatus may be made and of our invention.

. means for carbonating and refrigerating a liquid,

dispensing means, and means for continuously recirculating the carbonated liquid between the carbonating-refrigerating means andthe dispensing means. J a

2. A beverage dispensing system comprising means for continuously supplying cold carbonated liquid, dispensing means, and means for continuously recirculating the cold carbonated liquid in heatexchange relationship to the dispensing means for cooling the dispensing means as well as supplying the charged liquid.

3. In a beverage dispensing system, valve means for dispensing a flavoring syrup and carbonated liquid, a reservoir for supplying syrup to the valve means, and a. supply line constituting means for continuously supplying and recirculat ingcold carbonated liquid to the valve means and also bringing the cold liquid in heat exchange relationship with the reservoir for maintaining the system at a substantially constant temperature.

4. In a beverage dispensing system, valve means for dispensing a flavoring syrup and carbonated liquid,v a reservoir for supplying syrup to the valve means, and a supply line constituting means for continuously supplying and recirculating cold carbonated liquid tothe valve means and also bringing the cold liquid in heat exchange relationship with the valve means and syrup reservoir for maintaining the syrup and carbonated liquid at substantially identical temperatures when dispensed by the valve means.

6. A beverage dispensing system comprising means for car-bonating and refrigerating a liquid, a syrup reservoir, a dispensing means connected thereto, and means for continuously recirculating the cold carbonated liquid in heat exchange relation with the syrup reservoir and the dispensing means in the formation of a. recirculatory system, said dispensing means being also connected to said recirculatory system for with- "drawing cold carbonated water fondlspensing bonated water for dispensing purposes.

8. A beverage dispensing device comprising means for supplying a refrigerated carbonated liquid, a syrup reservoir, a dispensing valve connected to said syrup reservoir, and a carbonated liquid conducting and recirculating tube having recirculating connection with the carbonated liqingacasing,a

5. A beverage dispensing system comprising J means for carbonating and refrigerating a liquid,

a syrup reservoir, dispensing means connected thereto," and means for continuously recirculating the cold carbonated liquid in heat exchange relation with the syrup reservoir in the formation of a recirculatory system, said dispensing means being also, connected to said recirculatory system for withdrawing cold carbonateawater for dispensing purposes.

uid supply means provided with a sinuous heat exchange section disposed in heat exchange relationship with respect to the syrup reservoir and I connected with said dispensing valve.

9. A beverage dispensing apparatus comprissyrup reservoir ii -said casing, a dispensing valve having the thereof within said casing, a connection from said syrup reservoir to said valve, a'source of recirculating refrigerated carbonated liquid, and a carbonated liquid conducting pipe connected in loope'd relationship to the source of supply having a connection to said. valve and having portions thereof disposed in sinuous heat exchange relationship to the syrup reservoir and portions coiled around the valve body in heat exchange relationship.

PARKE H. 'rnomsort ARTHUR n. PEYATL dispensing valve connected thereto,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2502603 *Jun 30, 1943Apr 4, 1950Westinghouse Electric CorpApparatus for cooling and dispensing beverages
US2502610 *Dec 27, 1943Apr 4, 1950Westinghouse Electric CorpApparatus for cooling and dispensing beverages
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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/306, 62/319, 62/390, 99/323.2, 222/129.1, 222/146.1, 99/275, 222/485, 62/311, 222/424, 222/144.5, 222/131, 222/146.6
International ClassificationB67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0054, B67D1/0016
European ClassificationB67D1/00H2D, B67D1/00F2