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Publication numberUS2328408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1943
Filing dateSep 2, 1941
Priority dateSep 2, 1941
Publication numberUS 2328408 A, US 2328408A, US-A-2328408, US2328408 A, US2328408A
InventorsBeil William E, Floyd Farley
Original AssigneeBeil William E, Floyd Farley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf stroke teaching machine
US 2328408 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W, E. BEflL ETAL GOLF STROKE TEACHING MACHINE Filed Sept. 2, 1941 Aug. 31, 1943.

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG, 7.

W/LL/Aw 5. 55/1.

FLOYD FQRLEY INVENTOR5 ATTORNEY Aug. 31, 1943.

w, E. BEIL ETAL 2,328,408 GOLF STROKE TEACHING MACHINE Filed Sept. 2, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 45 W/LLMM E, BE/L FLOYD Ffl/PLEY A INVENTORS ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 31, 1943 E. Beil and 'Fl'oyd Fa-rley, Oklahoma City, Okla.

Application september 2, 1941'} Serial No MJGG' (Cl. 27 3-35l)- 11 Clair us.

invention relatesto ad'evice for mechani cailyteaching" golf strokes orswings; and it is believed to be'thefirst device of itsclass which holds, guides, and controlsthe movement of ag oif club while leaving a player comparatively free-to swing the golf club; with armsand-"body un'hampered; I

It is the chief object; of I this inventionto provlde a=devlce= which allows a player to grasp and swing the golf clubin" the usual manner; yet which guides the travel of the club through 'whatf is generally conceded by professional players to baa-perfect swing so that the learning player" is forcedto recognize-the faults both in his back swing and infl his downswing; The deviceisso constructed that lt'iorcesaleaming right=hand-" ed player to take a relatively slow back swing, tokeephis left arm relatively-straight all' the wa'y' to' thetoppf the-"back swing; to delay "the break of i the wrists until the proper time,- near' the top'ofthehack swing, to keep-the right elbow near the body; to'pivot the body properly during the backswing, and aboveall to recognize the properrelativeposltions between his-handsand club head at each point of the back swing. As is well known *to professionals and other ex part golf players, the club 'head anclthe "player's hands resp'ectiveljrt'ravel through different areas orpaths: as well 3 as through different respective blit' 'unehangi'n'g planes'durihg the back swlii and the downswing. Accordingly; this invention" also positivelyguides the'travel-of both'the'club' head and the hands inthe properrespective" paths and planesdurir'ig the downswing; even" to the point of notlfving the learnlngpl'ayer" when to bring the wrist muscles into play: just before the club head hits the-ball. Also; the machine encourages; in factalmost forces, a full "follow through after thechib head has p'a'ssecl its point of impact with the ball.

In addition to guidln'g'thecluhh'ead aswell? as the players hands in 'the proper pathsduring the complete swing, the invention forces the cli'tbhead to travel in'itsp roper individual plane during the complete swing, forces the player's hands to travel in their proper individual plane duririg" the swing, and is-so constructed thatit forces proper =pron'ation' ofthe hands and'club dairing the ha'ckswihg, and propercompensation or breaking-ofl'thewrists aothe top of the--back swing; At the toppfthe backswing the player's" l'ifil'i'ds-andtheclfib coihcide with the li'neofdm" tersectlon 'oftlie two planes-iii which the player's" hands and the -cIub-'head-have respectively trav eled tor'each 'thetop'bt the swing. This is-coi'i--' sidered theddea-h chili and hand positlow for starting-tlie*downswingr' Dining the dbwnswifig the device force's both" the club head and the player's" hands to return through" the" same re; spective -plaries= in which they traveled to rea'cl'r" the-top of the hackswing: 'Ihosvfamiliar'with the art willbiearlyflmderstand the important dis tinct'ion between the two planesin the club-head and hands respectively travel daring" a" swing; and the paths ih which} the' cluhhead ana handstravel" within their" respective inter sectiirg planes:

Another object ofthe invention is'to *providea" device of-this class; the use of which' may'he' coin controlled; so that-aplayer' desiriirgtoleam" the defects off his normal" swing insert a" coin, thus freeing the-machine for a" predeter' mined" number of" complete teaching swings.-

Still another obj ect' is'to provided-machine '01? thisclass which isadjustable to'suit players "of varying height," and which is so constructed that the golf stroke which -ittacl'iesmayf'be changed without" relduildihg the machine;

The details-'in'tlieconstruction or-a preferred" form ofour' invention; together with" other" ob jects attending*its prodtictlon;will be hetterun' derstood from the following description new read in" connection with the accompanying drawings; which are-ehosenfor *illostrativepur Figure 1 is an" assembled View of one" embodi merit" of the-inventioii, in perspective; withith'e". chib' 'holdihg and guiding mechanism in normal or locldedpositiony Fig.- 2 is a side elevation of a'portijo'n of the cliib' guidiiig mechanism, showiiig"d'etails of cofi struction;

Fig. 3"-is-a'n"enlar'ged"view, partially ii'i section,.. showing constructional" details of 'aportion of the club"holding"mechanisin Figs. 4 and 5"are,lrespectivel', 'sideand front elevations w'ithipart's broken awayvof' another portion "of the cliib guiding rmechanism; 7

Figs.- (i to 10, inclusive;are:side-elevationai: views of the various partswhich together form arnew type universal: joint used in' cohnecting a golf club to's: the rcitubr guiding mechanism-3 Fig:- 11 isvan eniarged perspective view; with parts broken: away aridipartswin section; showingdetails' iIi -the' construction of themachine lock ihg and coin releasing mechanism;

Fig& 12 is a d'ia'grarrinraticiront elevation ot 'a' portion'of the machii'ie; ahd isincitldedpriinarilv to' aid' th'e re'adeiin understandingthe manner in which the machine positively guides the travel of the golf club during the swing;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary sectional view showing in detail a preferred manner of rotataloly mounting the club guiding mechanism, and also showing its relation to the coin mechanism hous- Fig. 14 is a plan view showing further details of part of the coin releasing mechanism; and

Figs. 15 and 16 are side and front views respectively, with parts in section, of an additional part of the coin releasing mechanism.

Fig. 17 is a rear plan view of the central portion of a plate which is a part of the guide carriage.

The embodiment of the invention illustrated includes an upright, inverted L type standard,

designated as a whole by the numeral 2! 'Ihlh standard includes a base plate 2|, drilled fox attachment to a suitable base or platform.

Having one of its ends pivctally connected to the end of the horizontally projecting portion of this standard, is a supporting arm 22, which is firmly supported from its pivot point in various desired planes by means of an adjusting mechanism mounted near the upper end of said standard. This mechanism includes a threaded rod 23 disposed lengthwise immediately beneath this arm 22, and having one of its ends journaled in a journal bracket 24, preferably formed integrally on the upper end of the standard. The journaled end of this rod 23 extends through the bracket and carries a gear 25, which meshes with a hand wheel type gear 23, which is also suitably mounted on the standard 23. The means journaling the threaded rod 23 does not permit axial movement, but only rotative movement. An internally threaded collar 21 travels on the rod 23, and a link 28 has one of its ends pivotally connected to this collar, and its other end pivotally connected to the supporting arm 22 by means of an integral bracket 29 located on the under side thereof. When the hand wheel 26 is rotated in one direction, the threaded rod 23 is also rotated, and the consequent axial movement of the collar 27 along the rod 23 forces the supporting arm 22 to pivot in one direction about its pivot point. A reversal of the hand wheel 26 moves the'arm 22 in the opposite direction. This is an adjustment to accommodate players of different height, and we therefore provide an indicator 33 rigidly attached to the arm 22, and a height scale 3! rigidly attached to the end of the support 20. The co-operation of these two quickly apprises a player when he has the arm 22 properly positioned for his own particular height.

Mounted rigidly near the free end of the supporting arm 22, and extending sidewise therefrom is a rigid extension arm 32 which rigidly supports an arcuate member designated as a whole by the numeral 33. The entire peripheral edge of this member 33 serves as a track for a' guide roller in a manner described herein, and the member will therefore be hereinafter referred to as a track 33.

Rotatably mounted on the extreme outer end of the arm 22 in a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis thereof is a guide carriage designated as a whole by the numeral 34. This carriage includes an elongated plate 35 pivoted intermediate its ends at point 35 to the arm 22, as mentioned. A combination radial and thrust bearing 31 is used for mounting this entire carriage 34, as shownin Fig. 13, so that when the 5 stroke.

carriage lies outside the vertical plane due to an adjustment of the arm 22, there is still very little bearing resistance to the free rotation or movement of the carriage. Since the constructional details of the bearing mounting are shown clearly in Fig. 13, it is believed that further description of this mounting is unnecessary Near one end, the plate 35 carries a counterbalancing weight 38, while on the other side of the pivot point 36, it carries a'plate 39 positioned in a parallel spaced relation thereto by means of a plurality of identical spacer bars iii, certain ones of which rotatably mount guide rollers 4!, 42, 43, and 44, all of which aid in guiding the longitudinal movement of a club holding arm 15 in the guide carriage 34.

The arm d5 has a straight shank portion 46 which is substantially square in cross section, and an arcuately curved portion 41. On the shank 46 are rotatably mounted guide rollers 58, 3, 50, and 5! which are adapted to roll on the adjacent surfaces of the parallel plates 35 and 39, and thus additionally guide the shank 66 during its longitudinal movement. It will be noted that the rollers 4| to 44 inclusive lie directly in the path of travel of the rollers 53 and 5|, and thus serve to limit the longitudinal movement of the shank 43 in both directions.

As a means of normally maintaining the shank 45 at the inner end of its limited path of travel we provide a coil spring 52, one end of which is secured to an outwardly projecting pin 53 mounted on the plate 35, and the other end of which issecured to an outwardly projecting pin 54 carried by the shank 46. Longitudinal travel for the pin 54 is afforded by an elongated slot 55 cut in the plate 39.

The shank 46 carries an oppositely projecting pin 53 which in turn carries a ball bearing roller 51. A slot 58 in the plate 35 affords free longitudinal travel for the pin 55 as the shank 46 moves. plane with the track 33, while the arm 32 which supports the track lies out side this plane.

With such a mechanical structure, it will be seen that when force is app-lied to the free end of the club supporting arm 45 to move it and the guide carriage 34 in a counterclockwise direction, the roller 5? contacts and rolls along the outer peripheral surface of the track 33, and the arc in which the track forces the roller to travel has'a direct relation to the arc in which the roller 51, in turn, forces the free end of the arm 45 to travel (see Fig. 12). By varying the shape of the outer peripheral surface of the track, the arc in which a club 59 held by the free end of the arm 45 must travel during the backswing, can definitely be determined. Likewise, since the roller 5'! must travel on the inner peripheral surface of the track 33 during the down- 7 stroke (or clockwise movement of the carriage 34) the changing of the. shape of this surface will definitely determine the arcin which a club held by the arm 45 must travel during the down To make sure that a player using the device take a fullback swing we provide a spring pressed pivotally mounted trigger G9 on the upper end of the track 33. The outer peripheral surface of this trigger Gil lies directly in the path of travel of the roller 5'1, and so long as a full back swing is taken, the roller 5'! rolls smoothly over this trigger surface, and on to the inner peripheralsurface of the track 33, The position of the roller 51 at the top of a full back This roller 5'! is mounted in the same swing may be observed; in carriage position. C T of Fig. 12 (dottedlines). Inicase a playerbe gins his down swingbefor'e he has 'takena-proper complete back swing, the roller lpressesdown' onthe outer surface of the trigger Gdcompressing spring 6|, and the roller then hits the adjacent part 62 0f the track, and the downward travel of the carriage and the club is stopped, This forcestheplayer to the top of his backswing before he can take the down swing.

To assure that the roller 51 always travels up the outside of the track 33 durin counterclockwise movement of the carriage (during the backswing), we provide a pointed trigger 63 which is pivotally mounted on the opposite end of the track 33, and is normally held in the solid line p0- sition shown in Fig. 2, by means ofa spring 64-,

mounted as shown. In this position the tip end ofthe trigger lies inside the arcin which the: axis of the roller 51 moves, so that the roller 51 mustalways move up the outside of the track 33. This trigger 6-3 -has an additional function, however, and that is to present a slight resistance tothe travel of the roller 51 as the roller approaches the end of the track during the downswing. When the roller 51 moves from the track proper on to the inner surface of the trigger, the

trigger is forced to move to the position shown by'the dotted lines in Fig. 2, and the tension of the spring 64 consequently tends to slightly slow the travel or" the roller and of the carriage 34; This resistance to free travel is transmitted to the muscles of the player swinging the club 59', and his reaction is touse more wrist power to force the club head to continue its travel. By varying the length of the trigger 63, as well as the tension of the sprin used, a player can he taught when to bring his wrist muscles into his swing, and can also be taught approximately how much wrist pressure should be used.

After the roller 51 leaves the tip end of'the trigger 53, practically all resistance to the free rotation of the carriage 34 is removed, and thatlack of resistance coupled with the momentum of the carriage and its counterweight, causes the player swingin the club to follow through on his swing, or in other words, to fully complete the swing of the club. We call attention to the fact that by curving the club holding arm 45 substantially as illustrated, the arm easily clears the head of the player, even though they carriage 34 moves through an arc of 180 or more from the position shown in Fig. 1, either during the backswing, or during the follow through on the downswing.

As a means of connecting a golf club to the free end of arm 45, we provide a unique type of universal joint, designated as a whole by numeral 65. This joint includes a sleeve 66 which is interiorly tapered to fit the tapered shaft of the club 59. In assembly, the club head is removed, the sleeve 66 is' heated, and then slipped on to the club shaft to-a point near the handle, where it shrinks to a tight fit. The sleeve has a thrust collar 61, a. cylindrical bearing surface 68, and a reduced threaded end 69. The bore of a second sleeve 10 complementally receives the bearing surface 68, and .the sleeve 10 is held in position on this bearing surface by an internally threaded thrust collar ll, which screws on the threaded end 69. This sleeve I0 has a pivot pin 12 projecting at right angles therefrom, adapted to receive a sleeve- 13,. one end of which is providedwith an";

thissleeve tightly into a socketilS (Fig. 3) which is pivoted-for movement in one-plane only hither; end ofthe arm 45 inlthei manner shown in: Fig. 3; The sleeve 'l3 is held'inrpositiononthe pivot" 7 pin "by means of alargeheaded screw l6'and a washer". Thisscrew screws into the threaded end of the'pin 12. After the universal joint has i been assembled, as described,- on the club shaft the sleeve 13 is simply screwedtightly into the socket 15 by use of the knurled collar 14. The socket 15" is permitted a pivotal movementof' about to allow for height adjustment of the machine, for slight variations in the angle at which different players hold their clubs with re- "lation to the ground surface, and also to allow ciable' resistance from the means connecting 'the' club to the arm and its carriage 34.

While the device thus far-described is a complete operating unit in itself, in order to make it commercially practical, we definitely include,

'as a part of the invention to be used optionally,

a coin released control mechanism.

This mechanism is located in a stationary housing l8 mounted on the end of the arm 22" (Figs. 1 and 13). The open front end of the housing fits closely against the inside surface" of the rounded portion of the plate 35 as already shown in Fig. 13, so that this plate, while it: turns in relation to the housing, actually serves as a closure for the housing. The housing l8may" also serve as a coin box, and the coins can be removed by simply unscrewing the pivot pin 36v and removing the entire assembled carriage 34' from the standard.

Inside the housing, a ratchet wheel lil is rotatably mounted (Fig. 11). An arcuate leaf spring contacts the teeth of the wheel and serves to prevent its free rotation except in one direction, and then only in response to positively applied force. A dog 8| mounted for reciprocal movement in a housing 82 is spring pressed by means of spring 83, to contact the ratchet wheel. The housing 82 screws into a threaded perforation. 84 (Fig. 1) inthe plate 35, so that the dog.

, 8! moves about the axis 36 with the plate 35 asit rotates. On each .backswing (counterclockwise movement) of the carriage, the dog 8| contacts. a tooth of the wheel 19 and rotates it a distance equivalent to the spacing of the teeth, and against the tension of spring 80. On the downswing, however, the spring 80 holds the wheel against r0- tation, and the sloping face of the dog rides over. the sloping face of the nearest tooth, and this is repeated with each complete swing of the club,.

, thus gradually rotating the ratchet wheel.

integral knurled collar 14 to facilitate screwingc75.

Screwed into the back wall of the housing l8is a lock pin housing 85, which reciprocably houses a lock pin 85 spring pressed toward the plate 35' by means of spring 81. The adjacent surface of the rounded central portion of the plate 35 is superficially slotted with an arcuate cam type: slot I03 (Fig. 1'7) to receive the end of the pin 86, and to be thereby locked against counterclockwise rotative movement.

For retracting the lock pin 86 from its locked position in the slot I03 in plate'35, we provide a lever 88 pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on a pivot pin 89, in such position that one of its' ends moves in a plane to contact a. projection 90 on the pin 85. Near the other end of the lever 88 is a hook-lik portion 91 immediately adjacent the inner end of a coin chute 92 which extends through th wall of the housing 18. The housed portion of the coin chute includes a gravity or spring operated pivotally mounted dog 93 which lies directly in the path of travel of a coin in the chute. An interior lug I02 limits the pivotal movement of this dog 93 in one direction. Exteriorly, th coin chute is provided with a coin insert opening 94, and a bar 95 adapted to be reciprocated in the chute 92 by means of a hand lever 96 (Fig. 1), pivotally mounted on the arm 22.

To fully understand the operation of this control mechanism, it should be noted from Fig. 11, that the ratchet wheel 79 is provided with a through coin slot 97, which, when the wheel is rotated to the proper position, exactly aligns with a coin slot (not visible in the drawings) in the bottom of the coin chute 92 near its end.

The extreme outer end of the lever 88 terminates in a lug 93, which carries a downwardly projecting spring pressed dog 99 (Figs. and 16) mounted in a small housing kit, which screws into the underside of the lug 98. This dog co-operates with a cam 56! formed on the upper surface of the ratchet wheel 13, the dog and cam being suiiiciently wide radially that the dog stays in contact with the cam during th travel of the lever 88 from its solid line, or

locked position in Fig. 14, to its dotted line, or unlocked position, even though the pivotal axes of the wheel 19 and of the lever 88 are spaced apart.

As illustrated in Fig. 11, the control mechanism has almost reached its locked position, and the pin 86 by its penetration into its arcuate slot in the plate 35, prevents movement of the carriage 3d counterclockwise about its axis. To release the carriage so that a player may use the device, a coin of the proper denomination is inserted into the chute, the lever 96 is pulled forward causing the bar 925 to contact and force the coin toward the inner end of the chute. As the coin approaches the inner end of the chute, the edge of the coin first forces the dog 93 out of its way, and then contacts part Eli of the lever 38, forcing this lever to pivot about its axis 8Q, to simultaneousiy retract the lock pin 86 from its arcuate slot "33 in the plate 35. During this movement the dog 99 contacts the cam lfll on the wheel 79 and, if the coin is of the proper denomination, rotates that wheel a distance equivalent to the spacing of the teeth, thereby moving the slot ti away from the end of the chute 92, and preventing the newly inserted coin from. falling through th slot. Immediately after the coin passes the dog that dog moves back to its normal position in the chute against the lug and prevents the coin from backing up. The coin wedged between the dog 93 and the end iii of the lever 38, and resting on the upper surface oi ratchet wheel thus prevents the lever from returning to its normal locked position. The lever, likewise, holds the lock pin 86 in retracted position, and the device is unlocked and ready for use.

If the coin inserted in the coin chute smaller in diameter than a coin oi the proper denomination, then the lever 88 is not moved far enough to completely retract the pin 86 from its recess in the plate 35, nor is the ratchet wheel 19 rotated sufficiently for the next adjacent tooth to pass the spring 88. Hence the ratchet wheel 19 returns toward its former position, and the smaller coin drops through the slot 91 without unlocking the device, and all parts of the mechanism returnto their former locked positions.

The slot 9'! serves as a means of again automatically locking the device after a predetermined number of practice strokes have been taken. As previously mentioned it is so positioned that it moves into alignment with the slot in the bottom of the coin chute 92 after the ratchet wheel has made one complete revolution. When the two slots are aligned, the coin drops through slot 9! into the lower part of the housing. This permits the lever 88 and the lock pin 86 to return to their relative locked positions, at which tim further use of the machine is prevented until another coin is inserted in the chute and the cycle repeated.

From this description it should be clearly understood how the device accomplishes the objects mentioned above. The adjustment of the arm 22 about its pivot point definitely changes the position of the carriage axis 36 with relation to the horizontal. l'he changing of this axis 35 naturally determines the respective planes in which the guide carriage, as well as the end of the arm E5, must travel during the rotation of the carriage about its axis. The changing of the plane in which the outer end of the arm 45 must travel, in turn changes th slant of the respective planes in which the players hands and the club head must travel during their movement by the player in taking his swing. The adjustment of the arm 22 then, definitely determines the proper planes of travel for the players hands and the clubhead, with relation to the players height.

On the other hand the peripheral shape of the guide track 33 definitely determines the paths in which the club head and the players hands must travel in their respective planes. These two guiding forces, combined with the universal joint mounting and the pivotal socket 15 force the proper pronation of the hands and club during the backswing, the proper pivoting of the body, and above all assure that the club and the players hands coincide with the line of intersection of the respective planes in which the two travel, at the very top of the backswing. In this position an imaginary extension of the longitudinal axis of the club would pass directly through the point toward which the player intends to shoot the golf ball.

While we have described and illustrated only a single embodiment of the invention, we are aware it may be embodied in other forms, and we do not wish to be limited except by the prior art and by the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player, a guide track; a club guiding mechanism one end of which is rotatably mounted to move in a plane parallel to and immediately adjacent the plane in which said guide track lies, and another part of which is movable radially with relation to the rotational axis of the first mentioned end; and a roller rotatably mounted on the radially movable portion of said club guiding mechanism and adapted to roll on said guide track as the entire mechanism rotates about its .axis, the contour of theguide trackbeingadapt- -ed to predetermine the-path in which the free end of said club guiding mechanism trauels duringat least aportion of therrotational movement nf 'saidmechanism.

;2. In a device for guiding a 'golf :clubthrough "a predetermined path during its swing by a player, a guide track I a club guiding mechanism -one'end of which "is rotatably mountedto move in a plane parallel to and immediately-adjacent the plane in which said guide track lies, and anotherpart of which is movable radially with relationto therotationalaxis of the first mentioned end, said rotational axis being -movable "into: different positions with relation to. the hori- :zontal to change the plane in which said club guiding mechanism moves during its rotation; and a roller rotatably mounted on the radially movable portion of said club-guiding mechanism and adapted'torollon said guide track as the "entiremechanism rotates about its axis, the con- 'itournf :ther guide track being adapted to predetermine the pathiin which the free end of said :club; guiding mechanism :travels :during at least e. portion :of zthe rotational :movement of said mechanism.

3. Inna-device 'for guiding :a golf club through "a predetermined path during its swing by a piayeiya guidetrack; a club. guiding mechanism one end of' which is :rotataolyrmounted to move .i plane parallel .to and immediately adjacent the plane in which :said guide itra'ck lies, and another part .of whichis movable radially with --relationto the-rotational axis 'oi the .firstmenltionediend; *a-roller rotatablyrmounted on the radially .movable portion of said "club guiding mechanism .and ;-adapted to .-.roll on said guide track as therentire mechanism rotates about its axis, the contour'of'the guide track being adapted to predetermine the path in which the free end of said club guiding mechanism travels during at least a portion of the rotational movement of the mechanism; means for locking the club guiding mechanism against rotation about its axis; and coin operated means for releasing said locking means.

4. In a device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player, a guide track; a club guiding mechanism one end of which is rotatably mounted to move in a plane parallel to and immediately adjacent the plane in which said guide track lies, and another part of which is movable radially with relation to the rotational axis of the first mentioned end; a roller rotatably mounted on the radially movable portion of said club guiding mechanism and adapted to roll on said guide track as the entire mechanism rotates about its axis, the contour of said guide track being adapted to predetermine the path in which the free end of said club guiding mechanism travels during at least a portion of the rotational movement of said mechanism; and means for changing the position of the rotational axis of said club guiding mechanism with relation to the horizontal.

5. In a device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player, the combination of, a club guiding arm; means at the free end of said arm for connecting a golf club; a rotatably mounted guide carriage supporting the other end of said arm for movement toward and away from the rotational axis of the carriage, said arm also movable in an arcuate path to any one of a plurality of predetermined planes as said guide carriage rotates about its axis; means for changing the position 'ofthe-rotational axisaof said guide carriage with relation to the horizontal to predetermine the particular plane in which said club guiding arm --must move whenlthe guide carriage rotates; a

'guideroller mounted on said club guiding arm with rotational axis parallel to the rotational I axis of said carriage and a concavo-convex guide ion' whic'h said roller moves during at least a part ofthe travel of said'club' guiding arm, the contour of said trackbeing adapted to predetermine thearcuate path in'which the club carrying end L'ofsaid club guiding 'armrtravels in itspredeter- :mined plane.

.6. A "device for. guiding agolf club through-a predetermined path duringits swing by a player comprising: a guide carriage supporting arm mounted for adjustment in a substantially vertical plane; a guide carriage mounted on an end of said; supporting arm for rotation in various .planes allnormal to the plane in whichthe supporting arm moves; aclubguiding arm having one end mounted in.said carriage for longitudinal movement toward and away from the rotational axis of said carriage; a guide roller mounted on said club guiding arm and rotatable about an axis parallel to rotational axis of said carriage; an arcuate guide track also supported on said guide carriage supporting arm, and in the same plane in which said roller rotates; and a universal joint for'connecting the shaft of a club'to thefree end of said club guiding arm.

7. A device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player comprising: a guide carriage supporting arm mounted for adjustment in a substantially vertical plane; a guide carriage mounted on an end of said supporting arm forrotation'in various planes all normal-to the plane'in which the supporting arm moves; a club guiding arm having one end mounted in said carriage for longitudinal movement toward and away from the rotational axis of said carriage; a guide roller mounted on the club guiding arm and rotatable about an axis parallel to the rotational axis of said carriage; an arcuate guide track also supported on said guide carriage supporting arm, and in the same plane in which said roller rotates; a universal joint for connecting the shaft of a golf club to the free end of said club guiding arm; means for locking the guide carriage against movement about its axis; and coin operated means for releasing said locking means.

8. A device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player, comprising: a supporting standard; a guide carriage supporting arm having one of its ends pivotally mounted on said standard for adjustment in a substantially vertical plane; a guide carriage mounted on the free end of said supporting arm its rotational axis being at right angles to the pivotal axis of said supporting arm; a counterweight for said guide carriage; a club guiding arm carried by said guide carriage and movable toward and away from the axis thereof, one end of said club guiding arm projecting out- Ward at an angle to the plane in which the carriage rotates; a guide roller mounted on said club guiding arm for rotation about an axis parallel to the rotational axis of the carriage; a concavoconvex guide track rigidly supported on the guide carriage supporting arm in the same plane in which said roller rotates and in which the roller travels as the guide carriage rotates; and a universal joint for connecting the shaft of a golf club to the free end of said club guiding arm which projects outwardly from said guide carriage.

9. A device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player, comprising: a supporting standard; a guide carriage supporting arm having one of its ends pivotally mounted on said standard for adjustment in a substantially vertical plane; a guide carriage mounted on the free end of said supporting arm, its rotational axis being at right angles to the pivotal axis of said supporting arm; a counterweight for said guide carriage; a club guiding arm carried by said carriage and movable toward and away from the axis thereof, one end of said club guiding arm projecting outward at an angle to the plane in which the carriage rotates; a guide mounted on said guiding arm for rotation about an axis parallel to the rotational axis of the carriage; a concavo-convex guide track rigidly supported on the guide carriage supporting arm in the same plane in which said roller rotates and in which the roller travels as the guide carriage rotates; a universal joint for connecting the shaft of a golf club to the free end of said golf club guiding arm which projects outwardly from said guide carriage; means for looking the guide carriage against movement about its axis; and coin operated means for releasing said locking means.

10. A device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player comprising: a supporting standard; a guide carriage supporting arm having one of its ends pivotally mounted on said standard for movement in a substantially'vertical plane; means for adjusting the position of said supporting arm with relation to said standard; co-operating means on the standard and the supporting arm for indicating the degree that the arm changes position with relation to the standard; a guide carriage rotatably mounted on the free end of said supporting arm; a rigid club guiding arm having one end mounted in said carriage for radial movement with relation to the carriage axis, and having its other end arcuately bent and adapted for connection to the shaft of a golf club; a guide roller mounted on said club guiding arm and rotatable on an axis parallel to the carriage axis; an arcuate guide track also supported from said guide carriage supporting arm, and lying in the plane in which said roller rotates, said roller being adapted to roll on said track as the club carrying arm and its carriage move around the carriage axis, said track and roller being adapted to predetermine the path in which the club travels.

11. In a device for guiding a golf club through a predetermined path during its swing by a player, which device includes a rotatably mounted club guiding and holding mechanism and a track for predetermining the path of travel of the club holding portion of said mechanism during rotation of the mechanism about its axis, means for connecting the club holding portion of said mechanism to a golf club comprising: a threaded socket mounted for limited pivotal movement in a plane radial to the rotational axis of the club guiding and holding mechanism; and a universal joint one portion of which is securely attached to the shaft of the club, and another portion of which is adapted to screw into said socket and to afford free movement of the club about its own longitudinal axis and about an axis normal thereto and extending radially with relation to the pivotal axis of said socket.

FLOYD FARLEY WILLIAM E. BEIL.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/229, 473/259
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/365
European ClassificationA63B69/36D4M2