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Publication numberUS2328563 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1943
Filing dateMar 15, 1939
Priority dateMar 15, 1939
Publication numberUS 2328563 A, US 2328563A, US-A-2328563, US2328563 A, US2328563A
InventorsLichter Malvin
Original AssigneeStickless Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tray
US 2328563 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1943. M. LIGHTER 2,328,563

TRAY

Filed March 15, 1939 INVENTOR. mal 17b" GLchter WM? M ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 7, 1943 TRAY Malvin Lichter, New York, N. Y., assignor to Stickless Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application March 15, 1939, Serial No. 261,901 1 Claim. (o1.'229 3o) sively so that it might conveniently be used as an advertising medium to be distributed freely.

In the construction of ash trays, no real atten-' tion has heretofore been directed to the peculiar formation of materials in a manner adapted to construct the ash tray but rather machines and molds have been used to obtain the necessary formation.

An object therefore of this invention is to so arrange the parts of which the ash tray is formed that a simple, automatic operation upon the blanks of material will be suflicient to form the completed ash tray.

A further object of this invention is to form an ash tray of simple, inexpensive material, preferably paper or other fibrous board, which may be rendered non-inflammable.

Further objects and uses of my invention will be obvious in the following description and drawing in which:

Figure 1 is a view in perspective of my ash tray.

Figures 2 and 3 are plan views of the blanks from which the ash tray is formed.

Figure 4 is a view in perspective of the blank of of Figure 3 partially folded up for insertion in the orifice of the blank of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is across-sectional view taken on the line 5--5 of Figure 1 and Figure 6 is a diagrammatic cross sectional view of a simple type of mold for operating on the blanks of Figures 2 and 3.

The ash tray of Figure 1 is preferably formed from blanks of the type of Figures 2 and 3. The blank III of Figure 3 comprises a bottom portion I I, side walls I2, I2 preferably integrally attached to the bottom wall along folded lines l3, I3 and flanges I4 separated by the fold lines I5-l 5 from the upper edges of the side walls I2.

In the construction of my ash tray, the side walls I 2, l2 are folded up as shown in Figure 4 to produce the tray formation as shown therein and the entire tray is thereafter inserted as seen in the cross-sectional view of Figure 5 into the oriflce I6 of the blank I! of Figure 2 wherein the upper edges of the sidewalls II, that is, the portion adjacent the score lines I5, are engaged against the edges l8 or the orifice ii of the blank I I of Figure 2.

When the tray of Figure 4, formed from the blank of Figure 3, is thus inserted through the orifice l5 of the blank H, the walls I 2 of the tray are thus held in place and the ash tray is formed. It is then necessary merely to so secure the walls in place that they will not accidentally be removed from their predetermined position and thus destroy the ash tray.

Accordingly, the flanges H of the blank of Figure 3 are then bound to the panels I 9 of the blank I! adhesively or in any other suitable manner (see Figures 1 and 5). The lateral edges of the flanges I4 may be mitred at 2|, Figure 3, in order that they may meet along a common line (Figure 1), thus presenting no unsightly gaps in the structure of the ash tray. Other edges, for instance, the edges 23 of the blank of Figure 3, may be shaped or cut to match with similar edge 24,

-24 of the blank of Figure 2, as shown in Figure 1.

Obviously the flanges I4 may be cut or formed in any shape to produce any desired type of design. Likewise the outer edges of the blank of Figure 2 may be cut or formed in any suitable shape for any design desired. Nor need the flanges I4 of the blank of Figure 3 and the panels I9 01 the blank of Figure 2 be cut so that in the assembled condition they will match exactly, since by various difierences in the cutting or shaping of the flanges, various ornamental designs may be produced.

The shape of the orifice I 6 of the blank ll of Figure 2 will, of course, be such as to corresp to the desired or predetermined shape of the tray of Figure 4. Thus, when the tray is so arranged as to produce three sided ash trays or an ash tray having any other desired number of sides, the orifice of Figure 16 will be appropriately constructed.

This type of construction lends itself readily to rapid and immediate construction by hand wherein the blank of Figure 3 is formed into the tray of Figure 4, the tray then being inserted into the orifice of the blank of Figure 2 and the flanges pressed down thereon. The flanges Il may, of course, be stapled to the blank of Figure 2 or otherwise fastened thereto. When a glue or cement or other adhesive substance is used, then the finished structure or tray may be placed between the members 25 and 26 of the mold 21; the mold 21 thus not necessarily being used in the formation of the ash tray but rather for the purpose of holding the fianges of the blank 01' Figure 3 against the panels 01' the blank oi Fi ure 2 while the cement or other adhesive substance 28 (Figure 5) hardens.

It will also be obvious that this construction, while it lends itself readily to formation of the ash tray by hand, may be adapted to a machine construction wherein the blank 01 Figure 2 may be mounted on a member similar to the member 26 of Figure 6, the orifice or the blank of Figure 2 corresponding and registering with the depression 29a in the member 26, and the blank of Figure 3 may be pressed down and through the orifice of the blank of Figure 2 by the extrusion 29 of the member 25, the flanges H being pressed against the panels l9 and held against them while the glue hardens, by the members 30 of the mold 21. Likewise, any suitable fastening or stapling machine may be provided at 30, 30 of the mold 21 to efiect the fastening desired.

The bottom I I, the walls l2, and the flanges H of the blank l0 may be treated with any suitable fire resistant or fire preventing medium in order that the structure be operable as an ash tray. I have found that a surface layer of aluminum foil will present the most attractive appearance while at the same time fire proofing the portion of the structure which may be subjected to heat or flame.

Owing to the fact that the ash tray thus formed is inexpensive it may readily be used as an advertising medium in restaurants with the intention that customers take the ash trays with them. Likewise, they may be readily sent or distributed as souvenirs,

The use of aluminum foil as a fire resisting surface layer also lends itself to the insertion or imprinting thereon of advertising matter in an adapt this structure to such other purposes' Accordingly, I do not intend to be limited by the specific disclosures herein, but only by the appended claim.

I claim:

A combined ash tray and coaster for glasses which comprises a shallow cup-shaped main body portion die-cut and die-scored from an integral blank of fire and water resistant treated paper stock having a central portion with radially extending flaps, the said body portion including a fiat bottom part or generally regular polygonal form, a series of abutting side wall portions equal in number to the number of sides of the polygonally shaped bottom portion and hingedly connected thereto and flaring upwardlyv and outwardly with respect thereto and a, series of rim portions hingedly connected to said side wall portions, the side edges of which are in abutting relation and which lie in a horizontal plane, and a flat annular supporting and stiffening member having its inner periphery defining a polygon shaped to contact the upper, outer edges of the side Wall portions, and having its upper face underlying and adhesively connected to said abutting rim portions adapted to stifien said main body portion and to maintain the side wall and rim portions in abutting relation.

MZALVIN LIGHTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2710704 *May 9, 1952Jun 14, 1955Charles WebkeAsh tray
US2762547 *Mar 12, 1954Sep 11, 1956Diamond Match CoMolded pulp carton
US3104012 *Feb 12, 1960Sep 17, 1963Johnson & JohnsonContamination proof package
US3135455 *Apr 16, 1962Jun 2, 1964Johnson & JohnsonComposite sterilizable container
US3358900 *Oct 18, 1965Dec 19, 1967Grace W R & CoPackaging
US3561453 *Aug 11, 1969Feb 9, 1971Kline Jesse JDisposable ashtray and base
US4224732 *Feb 8, 1979Sep 30, 1980Energy Recycling Corporation Pty. Ltd.Method of manufacturing a container
US4265390 *Jan 16, 1978May 5, 1981Champion International CorporationPaperboard tray
US4349036 *Oct 21, 1980Sep 14, 1982Harvey Francis KDisposable ashtray
US5253801 *Dec 22, 1992Oct 19, 1993International Paper CompanyMulti sided food tray
US5337895 *Dec 3, 1992Aug 16, 1994Cleo, Inc.Protective end cap for paper rolled on a tube
US7975871Apr 4, 2008Jul 12, 2011Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Container with injection-molded feature and tool for forming container
US8124201Mar 8, 2007Feb 28, 2012Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Injection-molded composite construct
US8252217May 27, 2011Aug 28, 2012Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Container with injection-molded feature and tool for forming container
US8444902Jul 20, 2010May 21, 2013Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Container having a rim or other feature encapsulated by or formed from injection-molded material
US8464894Jun 24, 2010Jun 18, 2013Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Injection-molded composite construct and tool for forming construct
US8529238Apr 24, 2012Sep 10, 2013Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Container having a rim or other feature encapsulated by or formed from injection-molded material
US8540111Apr 18, 2007Sep 24, 2013Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Container having a rim or other feature encapsulated by or formed from injection-molded material
US8784959Jan 24, 2012Jul 22, 2014Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Injection-molded composite construct
US9132612Mar 14, 2013Sep 15, 2015Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Composite package
US20070194029 *Apr 18, 2007Aug 23, 2007Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Container having a rim or other feature encapsulated by or formed from injection-molded material
US20070262487 *Mar 8, 2007Nov 15, 2007Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Injection-molded composite construct
US20090250372 *Apr 4, 2008Oct 8, 2009Wnek Patrick HContainer With Injection-Molded Feature And Tool For Forming Container
US20100071712 *Sep 16, 2009Mar 25, 2010James Adam WhitePortable disposable cigarette butt reducing ash tray
US20100308064 *Jun 24, 2010Dec 9, 2010O'hagan Brian RInjection-molded composite construct and tool for forming construct
US20100314801 *Jun 24, 2010Dec 16, 2010O'hagan Brian RTool for forming construct
US20110012291 *Jul 20, 2010Jan 20, 2011Scott William MiddletonContainer having a rim or other feature encapsulated by or formed from injection-molded material
WO2007106367A3 *Mar 8, 2007Mar 6, 2008Graphic Packaging Int IncInjection-molded composite construct
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/496, 229/5.81, 229/169, 229/122.32, 131/231
International ClassificationG09F23/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09F23/00, G09F2023/0041
European ClassificationG09F23/00