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Publication numberUS2328583 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1943
Filing dateMay 17, 1941
Priority dateMay 17, 1941
Publication numberUS 2328583 A, US 2328583A, US-A-2328583, US2328583 A, US2328583A
InventorsReach Milton B
Original AssigneeReach Milton B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club
US 2328583 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. B. REACH GOLF CLUB Sept. 7, 1943.

Filed May 17. 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INvE ToR om Reac'z/ ATTORNEYS Sept. 7, 1943.

M. B. REACH 2,328,583

GOLF CLUB Filed May 17, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Sept. 7, 1943 UNITED STAT ES PATEN T O FFI CE GOLF .CLUB

Milton B. Reach, Springfield, Mass.

Application May 17, 1941, SerialNo. 393,903

16 Claims.

This invention relatesto golf club irons having/a. toeto heel length-several times that of` the face to backwidth, and'paizticularly `to multipiece golf irons.

lteferencev is made to a copending `.application bythe same inventor, Serial No. 322,885 fil'cd March S; 1940, which discloses a golfiron havinga hardened. bottomplate, and having a lie-contro1ling bottom plate.V The present invention embodies certain novel` simplifications and improvements over said application Seri-a1 No. 322g885;

Prior to the development of the clubs described in saidicopending application, golf irons were generally made in one piece oisteel forgings. For economy., and'to have van ideal striking face, such Onefpiece. irons were usuallvmade ,of soft steel or` mild steel. An. important disadvantage ot'theone piece Isoft steel golf iron .is that a relatively shortpr-:riod` of normal play causes lthe bottom portion'` ofthe ironr to become nicked and soratcl'iedbyl rocks. Suchwnick's and scratches sometimes `mar and 'harm the golf ball. Efforts to' harden the entireblade have resulted-inl de'stroyingth'e sweet feel ofthe. club and/or making. the entire clubv too brittle and/or too expensivefcr profitable manufacture;

It' clsfan; importanttobiectrof theapresent invention `to: provide afgolf club havingV `a vbottomfsurfanawithfa'highoresistancc toabrasion, wear andtaciverse racking', said` club `also havingw a sweet feel even betterzthan that ofwa :conventional golf iron.E

It is another objectof the present invention toiprovi'dea-hard'rbottomxcrwear plate-for irons which; althougnstructurally simple and. inex= pensively manufactured, isA very sturdily heldin place;

Another object-is to supplementwtheholding screws ior'abottomplate in suchafrnanner that,l even though i the screws 5 loosen',` the platel will stilrbe mamitained' againstthev mainbodyrof the head. Y

Specialpnoblems areinvolved intrying to pro vide a. hardplateL at the: bottom of `a1bod5'r. por; tion of agolfironheadbecause suchiheads are not thick-and donot provide verywmuch thickness.'A area, .and/or. volume. forholding: means.-

It is.' therefore arr important' object of the present" inventionv tov provider a` head structure frifirons. :tof'which a bottom: plateamay be advantageouslysecured;

Further-important .aims of the presentv inven tlo'rr areto` devise a golf; club.` embodying the Various objectives just set4 fcrtliand' also: possessing advantageous Weighting means by which ay tendencygto hook `or slice can be controlled or corrected; capable ci being easily modiiied to possess Whatever lie is deemed desirable; having a low manufacturing cost; having a multi-piece blade which is easily assembled and disassembled; having-securing means With its axis substantially within the plane bisecting the mass of the blade; and having weighting means with its axis substantially within the plane bisecting the mass of .theblade` Particular attention is directed to the fact that an important feature of several forms ci the presentinvention is the provision of interengaging meansysuch es a doveftail joint, preferably an arcuately disengageable dovetail joint, to prevent the'platelfrom idling from thefbody 01' the head even :though holding screws loosen. SuchA interengagingmeansmay be a V-slot, sloping wally slot, T-slot, or other type of joints of the class of joint-s characterized by a channel with depth- Wisel diverging sidewalls and portions engaging with said depthwise diverging sidewalls.

It should be especially noticed that certain forms o the present invention include the novel feature of spline means such as a floating rectangularblock within'adjoining recesses to prevent certain relative `movement between the bottom plate and the body or .the blade.

In the drawings:

Figure lv represents a front View of a preferred form of the present invention.

Fig.` 2is a bottom view of the iron of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3isa cross-sectional View of Fig. l, taken on the line/3--3 of Fig. 1.

Fig,v 4 is a front view-Without the plate.

Fig. 5 is a side view of the plate showing its upper-surfaces in a horizontal plane.

Fig. 6 is a top View of the plate shown in Fig. 5, as indicatedby `the line 6 6 of Fig. 3'.

Figs. 7 and 8 are cross-sectional views of Fig. l, taken on the lines 'l-l and 3 8 respectively oi Fig. 1.

Figs. 9 through 11` represent the main central planes of irons of divers lofts.

Figs. 12'through l5 are viewsv of a modified formoff the present invention. Fig. 12 is a front view of `the body Without the plate. Fig. 13 is a side View of the plate showing its upper surfaces in a hoiizontal plane. Fig. 14 is a top View of the plate showing its upper surfaces in a horizontal plane. Fig. 15 is a perspective View of the block of the modified form of the invention. Fig. 16 is a cross-sectional view of the modied form of the invention'shown in Figs. 12 through l5.

Fig. 17 is a front view of a simple alternative form of the present invention.

Fig. 18 is a cross-sectional view of Fig. 17 on the line lS-i of Fig. 17.

Fig. 19 is a diagrammatic representation to show that the lie of the clubs of the present invention can be easily modified.

'Throughout the specification the term length of the club blade refers to the heel-to-toe or longitudinal dimension; width refers to the faceto-back or lateral dimension; height refers to the bottom-to-top or vertical dimension; and bottom refers to the surface which in normal play is nearest the ground at the moment of impact ci the ball and club.

Before describing the present improvements and mode of operation thereof in detail it should be understood that the invention is not limited to the details of construction and arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawings, which are merely illustrative of the present preferred embodiments, since the invention is capable of other embodiments, and the phraseology employed is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring now in detail to the figures, and particularly to the simplest form of the invention as shown in Figs. 17 and 18, there is provided a blade 3D consisting essentially of a body 3| and a bottom plate 32. The blade 30 is connected to a conventional shaft, not shown, by suitable means, usually including a hosel 33. In the form shown in the drawings, the blade and hosel form a head 34 having suitable design features to increase sales appeal. A geometric plane 35 is shown in Fig. 18. It should be particularly noted that the geometric plane 35 bisects the mass of the blade and is somewhat, but ordinarily not entirely, parallel to the striking face of the blade. rIhe geometric plane 35 which divides the blade into forward and rear portions of substantially equal mass is sometimes designated hereinafter as the main central plane.

lt should vbe particularly noted that the body 3| and plate 32 are united by simple and advantageous spline means 36, best shown in Fig. 18. A recess 3l having sidewalls 38 in the body adjoins a recess 39 having sidewalls d in the plate. Within both of the recesses is a block 4I adapted to snugly engage sidewalls 3g and lil of the recesses 3l and 39 of the body and plate respectively. The block 4i and the recesses 3l and 39 therefore may be as long as the plate 32 and adjacent section of the body 3|, or may be one inch long or some other preferred length. A screw 42 having shoulders Si engaging with the block is adapted to pass through the plate. block and into threaded engagement with the body. The plate is thus secured to the body by a single screw and the spline means. More than one screw may be used, if preferred. The block is clamped to the body by the screw so that separation, vibration and chatter are prevented.

Particular attention is directed to the fact that the axis of the screw is disposed substantially within the main central plane 35. Because the axis of the Screw is within the main central plane, the manufacturing difdoulties incident to the use of securing means for uniting the bottom plate to the body of the blade are minimized. rlFhe likelihood of drilling through the rear surface of the body is eliminated by disposing the axis in the main central plane. It should especially be noted that' the likelihood of drilling through the striking face of the body is eliminated. If the screw protruded into the striking face, a golf ball might be marred or damaged when struck. Moreover, even if the screw did not protrude when the club head was initially manufactured, if there were thin sections incident to the disposing of the axis other than substantially in 'the main central plane, those thin sections would substantia-ily weaken the body and might cause it to break after a short period of normal use.

Moreover, by disposing the screw [i2 in the main central plane, the center of gravity of the blade 3B is not modified, and other important advantages are achieved.

Attention is also called to the fact that the plate 32 is preferably of harder metal than the body 3l, and that the plate determines the lie of the club. To change the lie of the club head 35, it is only necessary to replace the plate with another having different lie characteristics (e. g. have the plate .'52 thick at heel section and evenly tapered to be thin at toe section, for an upright lie condition; and vice versa, have the plate thick at the toe section and evenly tapered to a thin heel section for a low lie condition).

In Figs. lP-i there is shown an alternative form of the invention. A golf club head IM include;D a blade consisting essentially of a body 46 and a bottom plate 4l. It should be noted that interengaging means i8 are provided to better secure the plate to the body. The interengaging means includes a channel 49 preferably in the body, said channel having depthwise diverging sidewalls 5I! abutting against downwardly converging portions 5l on the interengaging member to form a dovetail joint which, as explained hereinafter, is preferably an arcuately disengageable dovetail joint. T-slot joints, V-slot joints, and other joints adapted to prevent the separation of the plate from the body are also intended to be within the scope of the term dovetail joint, and within the scope of the phrase relating to depthwise diverging sidewalls. The term downwardly converging is meant to deiine whatever shape is necessary for cooperating with the shape of the depthwise diverging sidewalls, whether simple sloping, T-shaped, V-shaped or otherwise.

Preferably but not necessarily the dovetail joint may be arcuately disengageable. As shown in Fig. 14, the plate 47 has curved portions 52 at the ends. As shown in Fig. 16, a screw 53 is threaded into the plate. The screw is provided with a tip 53 entering a suitable bore in body 66 to act as pivoting means about which the plate moves arcuately. Attention is directed to the fact that the axis of the screw is preferably disposed substantially in the main central plane of the blade 45, and that the bottom surface of the body and the top surface of the bottom plate are thereby in a plane substantially at right angles to the main central plane. A recess 54 in the body and a recess 55 in the plate are adapted to receive a block 55 which cooperates with the screw to function as spline means preventing relative arcuate movement. The recess 55 in the plate is of sufficient depth to fully contain the block, so that the plate may be pivoted into place, and thereafter the block may be moved upwardly by shoulder 5l' on the screw 53. The shoulder clamps the block against the body to prevent vibration and maintains the block in the locking position.

It should be particularly noted that in assembling the club head 44 of Figs. 12-16, the block 55 is dropped into the recess 55 in the plate lil which recess fully contains the block. The screw 53 is then passed through the plate and block so that the tip -53'- enters the'borein -the :body ywvhile the-place is substantially/'at right 'angles-with moet ofthe massoftheeplateawayifom tliebody.- The plate Aisr thenarcuately-swungf aboutthe screwas a pivot, and the downwardly converging portions il of ltheplate are-brought into engagement-mth the 1deptirvvise @verging-sidewalls' sill-of the 'channel Ill in the 'I body The dovetail joint; thus formed "prevents the' pla/te from droppingfrom the body, and -prevents fall relative1 movementbetweenthey plate. and body other tharr arcuate movementJ Wheny thesingleescre'w 53 is further tightened; the block` 56'1is `raised until :it ist partly within -thef recess 5l inAv thefbody', whilestill 're'- partly within the recess il? ofthe plate, thereby preventing amyfarcuatef movementfbeitween the plate and the body. As the bolt Vlsfi'u-rtink'liigliterredfL the#V block Lisi clamped lagainstl the body to lockfitiin place/and to preventvibration.

In that form of the invention shown particular'- ly. in'. Fl.. 148s a .golfY club iheadi Slincludes -a blade: v5Q'scmaisisting'` essentially ot 'af metal body' 6.0 andaabottom plate. 6i; Preterably in the'body is a .channel 62 havingsdepthwise. divergingfside.- walls. 53? abutting against downwardiyconverging portions. llofithe interengaging'-member to form a". dovetail joint; As` expiained hereinabove, depthwiseadiverging I sidewalls and?A downwardly emerging :portions include .'l'`sl1otfaturzations,l V`

slot formations; and.' other; `cooperating surfaces adaptedfto :prevent th'efpiate; fromzdropping. out

of: thee. body. The:- dovetail: joint t is preferably arcuately disengageable.

A pivotxstucli` integral. with `or secured .to the bottom `plateflil isadapted to'iltlmmsocket ,661m the; body 601 and. to" comtitute pivoting. means about which the bottomiplatetcan arcuately.mot/'e' The-relative arcuate pmovenxent engages-.andA dis'- engses' the dovetail joint. Screws-Sal passing thrwgh the plate .and:into.zialareadecl engagement with the: body vprevent l. arcuate movement roi' the plate relative to the body and maintains, the body and: plate engaged in saidcdofvetail; joint: AS shown invllg.` 8, tires-crews. arefip'referably-diss p osedfso thatv their axesare substantialiyima main central f plane 68 bisecting; themassrof ythe blade 59. The manufacturing diilicultiesfofdrilling .the body are minimized :bqv'fdisposing the .axes ofithe screws in themain central plane., inasmuch as the likelihood foi-'i drilling:v through .tlie-"bodyds substantially eliminated. Moreoverthe center :of gravity ofthe 'blade isnot aflectedby thescrews whenthus disposed.:y 'Trie-pivot4 stud-B5 is .also positioned with' its` axis.- substantially; inrthefmain central plane; In Figs. 9.-1l. the efi'ectvoi'f loft upon they main central plane-.isdllustrated, Espe'- cially in clubs having facesfsubstantially angularlyldistantfromthe vertical -(e. g. Eig; 9), `advantages accrue from having. the. axis ofthe pivot stud substantially in the main central plane. The tendency for the impact with the ball'to arcuately swing the bottom plate relative to the body is substantially'lessened by disposing; the pivot stud in the main central'plane and many lother advantages resultr from -this structural arrangement.

Itshould be noted .thatthe blade 59-`may=^be provided with a plurality of weiglttreceivingirecesses 69 disposed along a line from heel toltoe, each recess preferably havirrg'fitsaxis substantiallyin themain central plane Brand inthe body B0. Weights .10i may be placed` in. a lrecessnear the heel `ou toe to compensate for' amendencyfto sliceV or. a. tendency to. hook. Weights -may be placed `.in the outer. recessesto increase` the. mo.- ment'of inertia of the club about a vertical axis,

orfweightmmay be zplaeedfin thefinner .reoessesito minimize thefmnentwof 'inertia or a :weighted om llereovenuthenweights. canualso be: used in the-center f recesses; or' in: i ot' the recesses, to control th'e 'weight .fot thecclubhead, so :that: it will nwe'the-'desnfed-Ieelwhen used in play;` The weights may: be in vtlnfeeuzledr engagement with the bodyas shown infFig. 7;

Viriatlons aud-T modifications may bey made within' the, scope ot `this .invention and portions vof the improvements mayL-beused witl'ioutfathers;l

Haviugz'thusndescrlbbdthe invention, what is clauned: as new is:

l; Ina heackfor' atgolt iron: ther combination-ot a f metal body r having'. auchannelI f laterally f across the bottom thereof dened-by-arcuate and"depth wisedivergings sidewalls aib'ottom plate; pivotingsmeans *associating ythe plate--imsaid channel otkl the bodyri'rf relative'L arcuate movement incmdiagarcuate and downwardly converging por,-v tions oir'saidbottom plateengaging with sadfdi-v vergingy wallsl said' pivoting means4 preventing omerfthanvaxcuatevmoveimnt between the plate andbody; securing means-iadaptedto preventsaad arcuate movement.`

2L In ziet-.head1"v-forI angeli iron the combination ci a'metal body-having' a channelalaterally across the-bottom thereofdiifned byarcuate and Vdepth'- wisediverging sidewalls; .a liecontrollingy bottom plate, said body and bottom plate formi-:igea blade having aimainf central plane; pivoting) means associating' in tlieplte-lin saidchamiel and the bodyfforfrelative arcuate rnc-wernent;4 the yaxis of said ipivoting means being substantially-*within saidmaiircerrtral plane; arcuateA and downwwardly converging' portions on said bottom: `plate engag-y ingwitlisaiddiverging sidewalls to prevent other than arcuate' movement' betweenthe. plate: and bod-y; andi securing' means adapted to prevent said' arcuate movement;

32B In l-a head for a gnltiron Ithe-*corribili'mtion oi af metal Tbodyifhaving at channel laterallyfacross the bottomftherecldened byaarcuateand depth"-l wiseai-ivergmg sidewalls, said body hawing'afplu-l raiiity: of Weight-receiving recesses extending from saidchannel.; 'aleecontrolling bottom plate; said body and bottom plate forming a blade hav-v ingza; main central plane.; weights havingv their axes-substantially. in said f main central plane inasaid recessiawpivot studbaving. its axis :substantiallyvwithin saldiy main. central plane; said pivot '.studfassociatingethe plate. in said channel oiithe bodyzfor relativefarcmiemovement; arcuately sh :med"atrialJctofwnwardlyy convergingportions l on saidbottomplaterengaging with! said diverging wallsftopceventlother th'aniarcuate movement between .the plataand body; andsecuring means adaptedito prevent "saidl arcuate: movement.

43.- Ina `head for v'a .golf iron Athe combination o1.' an metal body ihaving a toe Kto .heel'f length several'timesth'e-facevtoback width, said body hav-A ingfa'channel laterally aereas-tha bottom thereof denned'iby' arclmteandwdepthwise diverging side-1 Walls; a bottom :platel-with'curved' ends; .pivoting associating the platerin said channel c-i the body'ffori reaatively,` arcuate' movement s including al'c'ciatev .andr'dnwnwardly' converging: portions on said: bottom piatezengagingxwith .said diverging mulls, saidsptvotingtmeanaipreventing other than arcuatemovement between thefplate and body; and@ securing means adapted.r to1 prevent-` said arcuate movement.`v4

5c. In ahead .for a golf iron the-combination of .'a.meta.l..body.having a channel .laterally across the bottomthereof de'ned by acruate and depth'- Wise diverging sidewalls; a plurality of weight;

receiving recesses, a toe to heellength several timesithe face to back width; a bottom plate 'of harder metal than the body, said body and plate forming a blad@ having' a main central plane; weights in saidV recesses and having their axes substantially in said main central plane; a pivot stud on the bottom plate and engaging with said body for relative arcuate movement, the axis of said pivot stud being subtsantially inthe main central plane; arcuately shaped and downwardly converging portions on said bottom' plate' engaging with said diverging walls to prevent other than arcuate movement between the plate and body; and securing means having its axis substantially in said main central plane to prevent said arcuate movement. v

6. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body having a channel laterally across the bottom thereof defined by arcuate and depthwise dii/erging sidewalls; a bottom plate, said body and bottom plate forming a blade having a main central plane, the top of said plate being substantially at right angles to said plane; pivoting means associating said plate in said channel of the body for relative arcuate movement; arcuately shaped and downwardly converging portions on the plate engaging with the diverging sidewalls to prevent other than arcuate movement; and securing means preventing said arcuate movement.

7. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body having in the bottom thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls, and having a channel laterally across the bottom thereof defined by arcuate and depthwise diverging sidewalls; a lie-determining bottom plate having in the top thereof a noncircular recess with side walls; pivoting means associating said plate in said channel of the body for relative arcuate movement; downwardly converging portions on the bottom plate engaging with said diverging sidewalls to prevent other than arcuate movement; a noncircular block; and a single screw associating the body and plate and maintaining said noncircular block snugly against the side-v walls of both recesses to prevent arcuate movement.

8. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body havinCr a channel laterally across the bottom thereof defined by depthwise diverging sidewalls; a bottom plate; downwardly converging portions on the plate, Vengageable with said diverging sidewalls; and securing means additionally securing the plate to the body.

9. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body; a bottom plate; interengaging means on the body and plate including a channel having depthwise diverging sidewalls, and portions engaging said diverging sidewalls; positioning means locating the plate relative to the body with the bulk of the plate away from the body and directing the plate into accurate engagement with the body; and securing means maintaining the body and plate in engagement.

l0. In a head for a golf iron, the combination of a main body; a bottom plate; pivoting means associating the plate and body for relative arcuate movement about an axis; interconnecting means on the body and plate, preventing other than arcuate movement therebetween; depthwise diverging side walls in said interconnecting means, said side walls being arcuately shaped relative to said axis; a main face in said interconnecting means, said main face intersecting said axis at right angles and combining with said side walls to denne a channel extending laterally across the head; portions in said interconnecting means interengaging with said side walls; and securing means adapted to prevent said arcuate movement.

ll. In a head for golf clubs, the combination of a metal body, with front and bottom faces, having a toe-to-heel length several times the face-to-back width, and having at least one recess in the bottom face, with a main face of said recess at an appreciable angle to the bottom face and at substantially a right angle to the front face; and weighting means extending upwardly from the recess into the metal body with the axis thereof substantially parallel the front face and at right angles to the main face of the recess.

l2. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body having in the bottom thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls and having a channel laterally across the bottom thereof de# :lined by depthwise diverging sidewalls; a bottom plate having in the top thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls; a noncircular block having an operative and inoperative position; downwardly converging portions on the bottom plate said diverging sidewalls and securing means associating the body and plate and normally maintaining the block in operative positionagainst' the side walls of both of said recesses.

13. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body having in the bottom thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls and having a channel laterally across the bottom thereof dened by arcuate and depthwise diverging sidewalls; a bottom plate having in. the top thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls; arcuate and downwardly converging portions on the bottom plate engaging the side walls; pivoting means associating the bottom plate in said channel of the body for relative arcuate'movement; a noncircular block having an operative and inoperative position; and securing means associating the body and plate and normally maintaining the block in operative position against the sidewalls of both or" said recesses to preventsaid arcuate movement.

le. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body having in the bottom thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls and having a channel laterally acrossthe bottom thereof defined by'arcuate and depthwise diverging sidewalls; a bottom plate having in the top thereof a noncircular' recess with sidewalls, said bottom plate and body forming a blade having a main central plane; pivoting means associating the plate in said channel of the body for relative arcuate movement about an axis substantially within said main central plane; arcuate and downwardly converging portions on the bottom plate engaging with said sidewalls to prevent other than arcuate movement; a noncircular block having an operative and inoperative` position and a single securing means associating the body plate normally maintaining the block in operative position against the sidewalls of both of said recesses to prevent arcuate movement.

l5. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body having in the bottom thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls and having a channel laterally across the bottom thereof defined by depthwise diverging sidewalls; a bottom plate having in the top thereof a noncircular recess with sidewalls, said bottom plate and body forming a blade having a main central plane; downwardly converging portions on the plate cooperating with said diverging sidewalls; a noncircular block having an operative and inoperative position; and a single securing means having its axis substantially in said main central plane and associating the body and plate and normally maintaining the block in operative position against the sidewalls of both of said recesses.

16. In a head for a golf iron the combination of a metal body having a channel laterally across the bottom thereof defined by arcuate and depthwise diverging sidewalls, said body having at least one weight-receiving recess; a bottom plate; pivoting means associating the plate in said channel of the body for relative arcuate movement including arcuate and downwardly converging portions on said bottom plate engaging with said diverging walls, said pivoting means preventing other than arcuate movement between the plate and body; securing means adapted to prevent said arcuate movement; and at least one Weight locked in said weight-receiving recess by said bottom plate.

MILTON B. REACH.

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WO2002043819A2 *Nov 30, 2001Jun 6, 2002Taylor Made Golf CoGolf club head
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/338
International ClassificationB24B13/02, A63B53/04, B24B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/04, B24B13/02, A63B2053/0491
European ClassificationA63B53/04, B24B13/02