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Publication numberUS2329452 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1943
Filing dateMay 17, 1939
Priority dateMay 17, 1939
Publication numberUS 2329452 A, US 2329452A, US-A-2329452, US2329452 A, US2329452A
InventorsGodfrey Bloch
Original AssigneeGodfrey Bloch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Textile fabric
US 2329452 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 14, .1943. G, BLOCH- 2,329,452

TEXT ILE FABRIC Filed Mziy 17, 19:59

INVENTOR Patented Sept. 14, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE "rax'rmn FABRIC Godfrey Bloch, new York, N. Y. Application May 17, 1939, Serial No. 274,210

3 Claims.

This invention relates to an improved textile fabric, and more particularly to a fabric suitable for mens shirtings, as well as for uniforms,

1 aprons, and launderable dress goods generally,

It is a further object of this invention to pro-- vide a fabric of the above indicated character which in the finished fabric has the necessary stability and wet strength within given commercial weights.

According to this invention the above and other desirable objects are accomplished by a particular arrangement or arrangements of cotton and spun rayon yarns.

It is true that launderable fabrics have heretofore been' made by blending cotton and spun rayon but, among other objections, some of the softness and lustre of the rayon staple is lost so that the same is not so suitable for shirtings,

for example. Other fabrics have been made by twisting cotton and spun rayon yarns together, and weaving the same into cloth, but for given yarn sizessuch fabrics are of relatively open mesh or of heavy weight by virtue of their twoply construction. Excessive weight renders fabrics unsuitable for men's shirting, and of course they are more expensive than if made with single yarns.

That is to say, cloths made of two-ply yarns, one thread of cotton and one of spun rayon yam twisted together; when of the right weight obtained in blending cotton and spun rayon, as I for dress shirtings. pyjamas, etc. (about, 3.50 to 4.50 sq. yds. per lb.)' are too. open weave; and when woven closely enough with yarns of the commercial sizes, 20's to 40s two-ply, the fabrics ficu-lties by making a warp with two setsof single yarn warp threads, one -set of cotton or other vegetable fibres, and one set of spun rayon fibres, and a single filling or weft yarn which is a blend of spun rayon and cotton fibres. Cloths properly made of such a combination of cotton and spun rayon can be stabilized within the 'limits required for a considerable number of commercial uses, particularly for garments customarily laundered by machinery. Furthermore, they are capable of being finished stable to a stretch or shrinkage factor below one to two percent, a

The warp threads .may alternate one cotton and one spun rayon, or four cotton and four spun rayon, more or less, 'but the number of threads of each group need not be equal. The threads or groups may be arranged in regular alternations, or may be varied to form visual effects, or patterns, as the spun rayon will normally gllsten above the cotton.

, The two sets of warp threads will normallybe on one warp beam, and. the cloth may have colored warp stripes or other decorations on the same beam or on an additional beam, as desired.

The cotton ends should be substantially all cotton, that is, they should not be weakened or made unstable by any large admixture of other fibres. The cotton ends should normally range from seventy to one hundred percent cotton staple. Also the spun rayon ends should not contain any substantial admixture which will detract from their softness, and normally'should have no less than seventy percent of rayon staple. The filling normally will consist of a blend of a; spun rayon and cotton in approximately equal proportions. Where strong and stable yarn'is by the use of high tenacity rayon staple, such blend may be substituted for the cotton threads in the warp.

Fabrics made in accordance with the aforesaid invention will attain the necessary stability, wet strength, and other objects of this invention A within given commercial weights, as well as at a are too heavy; and if made of two-ply of very fine yarns, such as to 80, the fabricsbecometoo expensive.

Cloths made entirely of spun rayon cannot be stabilized against shrinkage and stretch within the low limits of the exacting requirements of these trades, and cotton cloths lack the softness and desirable finish appearance of rayon.

The present invention overcomes all these difcost making the same useable for shirtings, pyjama cloth, dress goods, etc.

The drawing illustrates inF-igure 1 a diagrammatic, fragmentaryface view of a cloth'made according to this invention; Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1 and Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-.-3 of Fig. 1.

The threads or yarns a indicate warp yarns composed substantially of spun rayon staple, the threads or yarns b indicate warp yarns composed substantially of cotton fibres, and the threads or yarns 0 indicate the filling threads composed of the admixture of spun rayon and cotton as described.

For producing the finished merchandise, the greige goods will be stabilized and finished by any of the usual methods and processes, such as de-sizing, dyeing arid shrinking, to fit the same for service in garments and repeated laundering by machinery.

Theword group or groups as used in the following claims includes one or more threads in each group.

I claim:

1. A Woven laundry-stabilized fabric composed of three different groups of single yarns, the first group of yarns being substantially entirely of staple rayon fibres, the second group of yarns being substantially entirely of spun vegetable fibres and being interspersed with the first group of yarns throughout one dimension of the fabric, and the third group of yarns of at least fifty percent of spun rayon fibres and being into woven with the first and second groups of yarn; at right angles thereto.

2. A woven laundry-stabilized fabric composed of three different 'groups of single yarns, the first group of yarns being substantially entirely of staple rayon fibres, the second group of yarns being substantially entirely of spun vegetable fibres and being interspersed with the first group of yarns throughout one dimension of the fabric, and the third group of yarns of a spun admixture of vegetable and rayon fibres and being interwoven with the first and second groups of yarns at right angles thereto.

3. A woven laundry-stabilized fabric composed of three different groups of single yarns, the first group of yarns being composed of at least seventy percent of staple rayon fibres, the second group of yarns being composed of at least seventy percent of spun vegetable fibres and being interspersed with the first group of yarns throughout one dimension of the fabric, and the third group of yarns being composed of a spun admixture of staple rayon and 'vegetable fibres in approximately equal proportions and being interwoven with the first and second groups of yarns at right angles thereto.

GODFREY BLOCH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423366 *Sep 10, 1943Jul 1, 1947Godfrey BlochTextile fabric and method of producing same
US2501213 *Mar 5, 1949Mar 21, 1950Raycrest Mills IncFabric
US2522225 *Oct 18, 1946Sep 12, 1950Helwith Alfred LFabric
US2720226 *Apr 11, 1950Oct 11, 1955Alfred L HelwithFabric
US2828776 *Aug 16, 1955Apr 1, 1958Hans MeyerRemovable tabs or labels for marking textile articles
US2924252 *Nov 5, 1954Feb 9, 1960Baron HeinzDressing material for wounds
US4282011 *May 30, 1980Aug 4, 1981Dan River IncorporatedDebarking logs; aging resistance
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/426.00R
International ClassificationD03D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD10B2501/00, D10B2201/24, D03D2700/0137, D03D15/0027, D10B2201/01, D10B2201/02, D03D15/00
European ClassificationD03D15/00, D03D15/00E