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Publication numberUS2329739 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1943
Filing dateApr 21, 1942
Priority dateApr 21, 1942
Publication numberUS 2329739 A, US 2329739A, US-A-2329739, US2329739 A, US2329739A
InventorsBaker Joseph L
Original AssigneeBaker Joseph L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of making pile fabrics
US 2329739 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21, 1943. J. L. BAKER PROCESS OF MAKING FILE FABRICS Filed April 21, 1942 f/EDDLES W/ f/VESS. 5 w

Patented Sept, 21, 1943 Myinvention-frel aises to ih'e weaving (if-pile fabrics and comprises a hyel process for fria-kiixg a dqubie pile fabric compr sed" of we *fa'irirics *(each' 'comprisingiwo series (if bihdi'rig' threads, one series "of staffer warp mews,

weft yarns) "-cerin'eciiedby one or morefiir'eferably =two )'-series of p il Warps boimiio-ii 1&6 biibh fabrics! 'The -fabricfprpduced by the p geese Comprises a doiible jabric composedei 13w irigle ffabrieseach containing igi'iio setsdf bihfler wares, *a set of 'sfluffer war'ps' -and; pairs' of filler -01 were threads, o'he' fiwo "single-fabrics "being Mffified 59 threads 'commen to bdch'fabricsi' A ra-seman- :m thehboi/e desgtripiibhfifiti apr'tieess' =df- 'il'ikiflg it are disclosedin liefifiersffateht for a-iom adapted-1 to weave 'such'a fabric, No". 2,285, '19'3- sued to me June 9, 1942, m an abpii'ca't idri flied May 2 1, 1941QS 8Y. NO. 394,409, alSd iir I "seem No. 439,831. "The present in ntiori; howe er; is animprovemenfi dn the-prdeess deseribd iri 'saidmatent and e'nrtiddies' ether "featiires that; are

fiereifia fter deseribed and claim d.

both shuttles tiraverseihe 16pm, first air we 5 stuifer warp of the upper fabric; f the stuffer warp of the lower fabric; g and h the weft yarns of the upper fabric; 2' and a the weft yarns of the lower fabric; 172 and n the pile warps, each of which is common to both fabrics.

The warp heddles are manipulated to form four sheds having one arrangement of warps alternating with four sheds having another arrangement of warps. In Fig. 2, the four sheds are formed by the several warps. as follows:

( 1) Between binder warp a and stuffer warp e (2) Between pile warp m and binder warp b.

(3) Between binder warp 'c and pile warp n.

(4) Between stuifer warp and binder warp d.

The alternate sheds, illustrated in Fig. 3, are formed as follows:

(5) Between binder warp b and stuffer warp e.

(6) Between pile warp n and binder warp a;

(7) Between binder warp d and pile warp m..

(8) Between stufler warp J and binder warp c; At each side of the loom are provided two weft yarn supplies. In one specific embodiment of the process, a bobbin carrying a supply of weft yarn g and a bobbin carrying a supply of weft yarn 2' are arranged at one side (say the left side) of the loom; and a bobbin carrying a supply of weft yarn hand a bobbin carrying a supply of weft yarn j are arranged at the other side of the loom. Shuttles 0,;p, r and s are provided for the four warp sheds. Each shuttle is of the ty e, herein; before described, shown and described in. my said patent.

After one beat of the lay and the formation of sheds I, 2, 3 and 4 hereinbefore described, shuttle o engages the supply of yarn g and, traveling from left to right, pulls a double pick thereof through shed I; shuttle p engages the supply of yarn h and, traveling from right to left, pulls a double pick thereof through shed 2; shuttle r engages the supply of yarn i and, traveling from left. to right, pulls a double pick thereof through shed 3; and shuttle sengages the supply of yarn and, traveling from right to left, pulls a double pick thereof through shed 4. All the shuttles travel simultaneously.

.Each .of the shuttles, after it completes its traverse, releases the weft that it -has pulled through the described warp shed.

The paths of .the four. shuttles, in their described traverse' of the loom, are, of course, at J different levels. Immediately after the four shuttles traverse the loom as described, shuttle o is dropped from the uppermost level to-the next level below it and shuttle p is raised from the latter levelto the uppermost level; while shuttle s is lifted from the lowest level to the next level above it and shuttle r is dropped from the latter level to the lowest level. -After the next beat of the lay and the formation of sheds 5, 6, I andr8 hereinbefore described, shuttlep engages thesupply of yarn g and, traveling from left to right pulls a double pick thereof through shed 5; shuttle 0 engages the supply of yarn h and, traveling from right to left, pulls a double pick thereof through shed 6; shuttle s engages a supply of yarn i and, traveling from left to right, pulls a double pick thereof through shed l and shuttle r engages the supply of yarn and, traveling from right to left, pulls a double pick thereof through shed 8. i H

Succeeding movements of heddles and shuttles are repetitious, of the above operations, which results in the formation of a double fabric like that shown in Fig. 1.,

As the. woven doublefabric islffed intermite tently forward, the connecting pile yarns m and n are severed by a cutter and the two fabric are wound around spike rolls, as disclosed in my said patent.

The disclosure of mechanism to effect the above described operations is unnecessary, since such mechanism is fully illustrated and described in my said patent. However, the process embodying my invention is not dependent for its operation upon any particular mechanism. Indeed, aside fromthe necessity, from a practical commercial standpoint, of providing apower loom adapted to practice the process, its practice is not dependent upon any particular mechanism. For example, the fabric may be woven on a handoperated loom.

While the mechanism for effecting the above described operations may be considered to involve little more than a duplication of the mechanism illustrated and described in my said patent,

neither the process nor the resultantfabric constitutes a mere duplication, since the sheds are so formed that; there is produced, not two double fabrics each like the double fabric produced by the patented loom, but only one double fabric.

That is, both of the processes produce double fab; rics, alike in that each single component fabric comprises two sets of binder warp and a set of stuffer warps, there being a set of pile warps common to both fabrics. While the fabric produced by the specific process hereindescribed contains an additional set of pile warps common to both fabrics, one of them might be omitted.

The two fabrics, however, differ in thatin the fabric disclosed in my said patent the single set of pile warps connect half th pairs of wefts 'of one fabric with half the pairs of wefts of the other fabric; while in the fabric produced by the process embodying the present invention each of the-two sets of pile warps connects one-fourth of the pairs of wefts Of one fabric with one-fourth of'the pairs of wefts of the other fabric.

As above stated, it is not essential toutilizetwo sets of pile warpasince eithenthe'pile warps m or the pile warps 11 maybe omitted, and in such a fabric, also, the single set of pile warps connects one-fourth of the pairs of wefts ofone fabric with one-fourth of the pairs of.;wefts ,of the other fabric. i T 1 The advantage of the present process, therefore, over the process practiced-in the said patented loom is not that it produces two double fabrics instead of one double fabric, but that it produces one double fabric havingfeatures in common with, but not identical with, the fabric disclosed in the patent, at twice the speed at which the double fabric of, the patent is produced, and therefore at much over four times the speed of production of a single fabric on an ordinary pile fabric loom; Considering the factor of higher practicable speed of travel ,of the shuttles and the factor of continuous operationwithout replenishment of the shuttles,. the speed of pro; duction approximates, ene exceed. five times the speed of production' of the" ordinary loom.

As one of a number of possible modifications} eachof the shuttles may at all times traverse the loom on the same level, first in one direction and then in the other direction. ,This modification would necessitate -the employment of eight yarn supplies, fourl'at each sid'iofthe loom; ,1,

Less desirably, instead ofutilizingfour shuttles, of t kind des ribednfi m said tstsntiwhish are adapted to pull a 'double pick of yarn across 'l o ch" serratere e e- "c r ew tween :the second named two sheds of binder warp threads, and simultaneously inserting double picks of weft yarn between all of said sheds: thereby forming two woven fabrics, each comprising two sets of binder 1 warp threads united by pile threads common to both fabrics and engaging every fourth double pick of weft yarn.

5. The herein described process of weaving pile fabrics which comprises manipulating four sets of binder warp threads, two sets of stuffer warp threads and pile warp threads to form four sheds, one shed between one set ofbinder warp threads and one set of stufier warp threads, an adjacent second shed between pile warp threads and a second set-of binder warp threads, a next adjacent third shed between a third set of binder warp threads and the second set of stuffer warp threads, and a next adjacent shed between the second set of stufier warp threads and the fourth set of binder warp threads, and providing four weft yarn supplies; inserting simultaneously double picks of weft yarns between the four sheds respectively and then releasing the yarns; then manipulating the four sets of binder warp threads to reverse the relative positions of the two first mentioned sets of binder warp threads and of the two last mentioned sets of binder warp threads and so manipulating pile warp threads that the second shed is formed between the first set of stuirer warp threads and the first set of binder warp threads and that the third shed is formed between the fourth set of binder warp threads and pile warp threads; then inserting simultaneously double picks of weft yarn between the four sheds respectively and then releasing the yarns: thereby forming two woven fabrics, each comprising two sets of binder warp threads and a set of stuffer warp threads, united by pile warp threads common to both fabrics.

6. The herein described process of Weaving pile fabrics which comprises manipulating four sets of binder warp threads, two sets of stufier warp threads and two sets of pile warp threads to form four sheds, one shed between one set of binder warp threads and oneset, of stufier warp threads, an adjacent second shed between one set of-pile warp threads and a second set of binder warp threads, a next adjacent third shedbetween a third set of binder warp threads and the other set of pile warp threads, and a next adjacent fourth shed between the second set of stuffer warp threads and the fourth set of binder warp threads, and providing four weft yarn'supplies; inserting simultaneously double picks of weft yarns between the four sheds respectively and then releasing the yarns; then manipulating the binder warp threads and pile warp threads to reverse the relative positions of the two first mentioned sets of binder warp threads, ,ofthe two last mentioned sets of binder warp threads and of the two pile warp threads; then inserting simultaneously double picks of weft between the four sheds; respectively and then releasing the yarns; therebyjforming two woven fabrics, each comprising two sets of binder, warp threads and one set of stufierwarp threads, united bytwo sets of pile warp threads common to both fabrics.

7. The hereindescribed process of weaving pile fabric which comprises manipulating four sets of binder warp threads and two sets of pile warp threads to formfour'sheds, one shed between one set of binder warp threads and one set of pile warp threads, an adjacent second shed between said set of pile warp threads and a second set of binder warp threads, a next adjacent third shed between a third set of binder warp threads and the other set of pile warp threads, and a next adjacent fourth shed between the last named set of pile warp threads and the fourth set of binder warp threads, and providing four yarn supplies; then inserting simultaneously double picks of weft yarns between the-four sheds respectively and then releasing the yarns; then manipulating the binder warp threads and pile warp threads to reverse the relative positions of the two first mentioned sets of binder warp threads, of the two last mentioned sets of binder warp threads, and of the two sets of pile warp threads; then inserting simultaneously double picks of weft yarns between the four sheds respectively and then releasing the larn: thereby forming two woven fabrics each comprising two sets of binder warp threads united by two sets of pile warp threads common to both fabrics.

8. The herein described process of weaving pile fabric which comprises manipulating four sets of binder warp threads and pile warp threads to form four sheds, one shed being between two sets of binder warp threads, an adjacent second shed between pile warp threads and one of the last named sets of binder warp threads, and each of the next two sheds between the other two sets of binder warp threads, andproviding four yarn supplies; then inserting simultaneously double picks of weft yarn between the four sheds respectively and then releasing the yarns; then manipulating the four sets of binder warp threads to reverse the relative positions of the two first mentioned sets of binder warp threads and of the two last mentioned sets of binder warp threads and so manipulating pil warp threads that the first and second sheds are formed between the first named two sets of binder Warp threads, the third shed between pile warp threads and one ofthe second named two sets of binder warp threads and the fourth shed between the second named two sheds of binder warp threads, then simultaneously inserting double picks of weft yam between the four sheds respectively and then releasing the yarns; thereby forming two woven fabrics, each comprising two sets of binder warp threads united by pile threads common to both fabrics and engaging every fourth double pick of weft yarn. l l

; JOSEPH L. BAKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2929412 *Mar 16, 1955Mar 22, 1960Thomas C AbendrothMulti-ply fabric
US5175034 *Jan 25, 1990Dec 29, 1992Parabeam Industrie- En Handelsonderneming B.V.Facing cloth and backing cloth connected by having warp and weft threads tied in space between cloths, high strength, stiffness
US6923219Apr 11, 2003Aug 2, 2005J.B. Martin Company, Inc.Double-sided fabric: flat side / woven pile fabric
US6945280Sep 11, 2003Sep 20, 2005N. V. Michel Van De WieleMethod for weaving a pile fabric
EP0384140A1 *Jan 24, 1990Aug 29, 1990PARABEAM Industrie- en Handelsonderneming B.V.Double plush woven fabric
EP0612874A1 *Jan 28, 1994Aug 31, 1994CHEMNITZER WEBMASCHINENBAU GmbHMethod and device for making a double-carpet
EP1398403A1 *Sep 4, 2003Mar 17, 2004N.V. Michel Van de WieleMethod for weaving a pile fabric
WO1993010295A1 *Nov 18, 1992May 27, 1993Bipalifin SaMethod and device for weaving
WO1994000629A2 *May 25, 1993Jan 6, 1994Herbert JanssenMethod and device for the manufacture of a double-plush woven fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/398, 139/21
International ClassificationD03D27/00, D03D27/10
Cooperative ClassificationD03D27/10
European ClassificationD03D27/10