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Publication numberUS2330338 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1943
Filing dateMay 27, 1939
Priority dateMay 27, 1939
Publication numberUS 2330338 A, US 2330338A, US-A-2330338, US2330338 A, US2330338A
InventorsArthur E Dekome, Herman C Dekome, Vincent J Sedlon
Original AssigneeArthur E Dekome, Herman C Dekome, Vincent J Sedlon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roller skate
US 2330338 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p 1943- v A. E. DEKOME ET AL M 2,330,338

ROLLER SKATE Filed May 2'7, 1939 "Milt m Arthur E D zkomz I Hermann C5. Dekome. d Vi meat J- sedlon,

I N v LN TO Rs 1 W, ,MWW

Patented Sept. 28, 1943 ROLLER SKATE Arthur E; Dekome, Garfield Heights, and Herman C. Dekome and Vincent .1. Sedlon, Cleveland,

Ohio

Application May 27, 1939, Serial No. 276,180

Claims.

This invention relates to roller skates, more particularly to roller skates adapted for use on a roller rink. The principal object of this invention is to provide new and improved roller skates.

In the drawing accompanying this specification, and forming a part of this application, there is shown, for purposes of illustration, one form which the invention may assume, and in this drawing:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a roller skate illustrating an embodiment of the invention,

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the roller skate shown in Figure 1,

Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view along the longitudinal center of the skate, and

Figure 4 is a more or less diagrammatic view showing a relation of parts of the skate under certain conditions.

The embodiment herein shown to illustrate I the invention comprises plate means Ill, which may be formed similar to the plate means of a roller skate of usual construction. The plate means ID, at its rear end, may have the usual heel cup ll, formed with slots to receive a fastening strap l2, while at its forward end, the plate means may have the usual clamping structure l3. 7

Rigidly secured to the plate means Ill, and extending from the under surface of the plate means, are members I4, spaced apart longitudinally with respect to the plate means It], each member forming connection providing means for receiving corresponding parts of a roller carrying means I5. In the embodiment shown, each member comprises spaced blocks l6 and I 1, each block providing a socket for receiving a part of the respective roller carrying means IS. The block I 6 is in the form of an inverted cup, having an aperture l8 formed in its closed end, whereas the block 11 is formed with a screw threaded aperture l9 extending therethrough. The portion l1 also has a screw-threaded aperture 20 disposed at an angle to the aperture [9, the axis of the aperture 20 being generally parallel to the plate means In.

- The spaced blocks l6 and I1 are formed with apertured ears 2| for receiving rivets 22,. the rivets also passing through the plate means II], for the purpose of rigidly holding the blocks assembled with the plate means. Means are provided to brace the construction of the roller skate adjacent each of the membersv l4, and

as here shown, this means comprising a strut 23, formed integral with and extending between the blocks ([6 and |1, but being preferably spaced from the plate means In and inclining upward from the block 11 to the block l6- The roller carrying means 15 comprises a housing or axle carrier 24, for receiving an axle 25. Extending from. the housing 24 are arm means 26 and 21, these arm means diverging ,with respect to each other from the housing 24 in a direction toward the plate means 10. The arm 21 is inclined a greater amount with respect to the vertical than is the arm 26, as clearly shown in Figure 3. The ends of the arms 26 and 21 of each roller carrying means l5 are secured to a respective member l4, suitable means being interposed to minimizethe transmission of shock from the 'roller carrying means 15 to the plate means I, when the roller skate is in use, while at the same time permitting movement of the roller carrying means I5 relative to the plate means 10.

As here shown, the arm means 26 comprises a portion 28 integral with the housing 24, the end 29 of this portion being of a cross-sectional size somewhat smaller than the area of the cup or socket formed by the block IS. A shoulder 30 is formed by the reduced end 29, this shoulder being spaced inwardly from the extremity of the end, and resilient means 3| is carried by the end 26. The resilient means 3|, as here shown, comprises a tubular rubber buffer fitting over the end '29, and being of a cross-sectional size to snugly fit the cup or socket formed by the block l6. The cross-sectional sizes of the end 29 and the aperture I8 in the cup or socket formed by the block l6 are so proportioned that when the rubber bufl'er' is compressed, the extremity of the end 29 may freely extend into the aperture I 8.

The arm means 21 comprises an abutment 32 integrally extending from the housing 24, and being apertured as at 33.- The abutment 32 is provided with a seat 34, in which is positioned resilient means, such as the rubber buffer 35 herein shown. The rubber bufier 35 is provided with an aperture 36, through which freely extends the shank of a screw-threaded stud 31, the aperture 33 in the abutment 32 being enlarged with respect to the cross-sectional size of the stud 31, as shown in Figure 3. The head 38 of the stud 31 overlies the surface of the abutment opposite the seat 34, a washer 39 being preferably interposed between the head 38 and the adjacent surface of the abutment 32.

The

threaded extremity of the stud 81 is screwthreadedly received within the socket or aperture i9 formed in the block H. A sheet-metal cup metal cup 40 to the rubber buifer 35, adjust-' ment of the-nut 4i providing for the desired compression of the rubber buffer 35.

As willbe, clearly seen in Figures 1 and 2,

the members M are similar, but oppositely disposed. so that the apertures 20 in the facing blocks I! are in aligned relation. Means are provided to brace the skate structure, and particularly that portion of the plate means i which lies between the members M. The brace means, as here shown, comprises a rod 42 underlying and preferably spaced from the bottom surface of the plate means ID, the rod 42 having screw-threaded extremities respectively received within a screw-threaded aperture 20. Thus, the plate means I0 is held against bending or buckling action under any circumstances. As best seen in Figure 1, the rod 42, in effect, forms a continuation of the strut 23, and in this manner forms a truss construction effectively reenforcin the entire roller skate construction.

The invention herein disclosed provides a construction wherein each wheel carrying means I5 is assembled with the plate means III at a plurality of points, suitable means being provided at-these points to prevent shock from being transmitted from the wheel carrying means l5 to the plate means I0. Also, the construction is such that when pressure is applied to one side or the other of the plate means It}, the plate means will tilt downwardly at that side where pres-' sure is applied, as shownin Figure 4. This tilting movement causes a combined compression and twisting of the rubber buffers 3i and 35, causing each of the wheel carrying means l5 to twist a proportional amount, the wheel carry.- ing means moving in complementaryrelation, so that the user of the roller skate'may steer the skate in any desired direction by applying a greater pressure on one or the other side of the plate means I 0. When this greater pressure removed, the resiliency of the rubberbuffers will bring the, wheels to straight forward position. Inasmuch as the nut 4| adjusts the compression 1 a of the butter 35, compression as wellas torsion oi the buifer 35 is controlled, therebycontrollingm the shock absorbing qualities as well as the steer ing qualities of the skate construction.

v Itwill be apparent to those skilled in the art; that we have accomplished at least the principal object of our invention, and it, also will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the embodiment herein described may be variouslyv changed and modified, without departing from limited thereto.

We claim: r

1. A roller skate, comprising: plate means, adapted to underlie the shoe of a user of the aasaeae ward respective socket means; one of said arm means comprising an apertured abutment and a stud extending through said aperture and secured in one of said socket means, and comprising also a rubber butler disposed about said stud and interposed between said abutment and said one socket means, and the other of said arm means comprising an end of smaller cross-sectional size than the other socket means and a shoulder spaced inwardly of said end, and comprising also a rubber bufler disposed about said end and interposed between said shoulder and the bottom of said other socket means.

2. A roller skate, comprising: plate means, adapted to underlie the shoe of a user of the skate; spaced-apart socket-providing blocks, rigidly connected to said plate means and projecting from the under surface of said plate means, said blocks having an integral strut extending therebetween and so constructed and arranged as to efiect bracing of said blocks; and roller carrying means, comprising an axle carrier and a pair of arm means extending from said axle carrier toward respective sockets, one of said arm means comprising an apertured abutment and a stud extending through said aperture and secured in one of the sockets, and comprising also a rubber bufl'er disposed about said stud and interposed between said abutment and the respective socketproviding block, and the other of said arm means comprising an end of smaller cross-sectional size than the other socket, and a shoulderspaced inwardly of said end, and comprising also a rubber buffer disposed about said end and fitting said other socket, and interposed between said shoulder and the bottom of said other socket.

3. A roller skate, comprising: plate means, adapted to underlie the shoe of a user of the skate; two spaced-apart members aligned longitudinally of said plate means, each member comprising a pair of spaced-apart blocks, projecting from the under surface of said plate means and rigidly connected to said plate means, each pair of blocks having an integral strut extending therebetween and so constructed and arranged as to eflect bracing of said blocks, and each individual block having a socket the axis of which extends transversely withwrespect to said plate means-and the facing blocks of said spaced-apart -members each having a socket the axis of which extends generally. parallel withi'espect to said plate means; roller carrying means connected to eachfof said members, each roller carrying means comprising an axle carrier and a pair of arm means-extending from said axle carrier and toward the pairof blocks in the respective member, one. of said am means comprising an aper- 't'ured abutment and a stud extending through ,saidaperture and secured in the transversely extending socket of oneblock, and comprising also I a rubber butter disposed about said stud and inspaced inwardly of said end, and comprising also arubber buffer disposed about said end and fitting the socket in' said other block, and interposed skate; a member, rigidly secured to the under surface of said plate means, and providing spaced-apart socket -means; roller carrying means, comprising an axle carrier and a pair of arm means extending from-said axle. carrier toterposedbetween'said abutment and said one block, and the other of said arm means comprising an end of smaller cross-sectional size than the socket in the other block, and a shoulder between said shoulder and the bottom of the socket in said other block; and a bracing rod, underlying said plate means, and having its ends secured within the sockets of said facing blocks.

4. A roller skate, comprising: means, adapted to underlie'the shoe of a user of the skate, including a plate adapted toengage the tread face nection-efiecting means extending from the under surface of said plate and providing a pair of spaced-apart recesses, one of which is formed with interior screw-threads; an axle carrier; a pair of arms extending in spaced relation from said axle carrier, each having a portion by which said plate means is supported by said axle car- 7 2,330,838 to! the foot or footwear of the wearer, and conr rier, and one of said portions being apertured; a I

pair of resilient means, respectively interposed 'screw-threadedly engaging the threads of said threaded one of said recessesv 5. A roller skate, comprising: plate means,

adapted to be engaged by the tread face of a foot' or footwear of the wearer; an axle carrier; a pair of arms extending from said axle carrier in spaced relation and having a portion by which said plate means is supported by said axle carrier; a pair of resilient means, respectively interposed between each of said portions and said plate means; one of said portions and the respective part of said plate means being so constructed and arranged to provide a recess and a cooperating projection of a cross-sectional size smaller than said recess and formed with a shoulder, and the respective resilient means being so constructed and arranged that it fits about said projection, bears against said shoulder, and seats in said recess.

-ARTHUR E. DEKOME. HERMAN C. DEKOME. VINCENT J. SEDLON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2430533 *Dec 28, 1944Nov 11, 1947Reich George ARoller skate
US2533740 *Dec 11, 1945Dec 12, 1950Alan E MurrayRoller skate
US2542829 *Jan 15, 1945Feb 20, 1951Alan E MurraySkate
US2561448 *Aug 12, 1946Jul 24, 1951Murray Alan ESkate for roller skating
US2572133 *Jun 11, 1947Oct 23, 1951Glenn Thomas CRoller skate truck construction
US2581809 *Mar 5, 1947Jan 8, 1952Alan E MurrayRoller skating suspension skates
US2606768 *May 10, 1947Aug 12, 1952Carroll M BiermanRoller skate
US2719725 *Jul 22, 1948Oct 4, 1955Chicago Roller Skate CoYieldable wheel mounting for roller skate
US2744759 *May 8, 1953May 8, 1956Sternbergh DavidToe brake for roller skates
US3774924 *Sep 13, 1971Nov 27, 1973A MachatschRoller skates
US4089536 *Apr 8, 1976May 16, 1978Henry LarruceaWheel carriage assembly
US4166629 *Nov 21, 1977Sep 4, 1979List Richard ASkateboard truck
US4278264 *Jul 6, 1979Jul 14, 1981Lenz Brent LSkate
US4915399 *Apr 5, 1988Apr 10, 1990Marandel Jean BernardSuspension system for roller skates and similar devices
US6474666 *Mar 14, 2001Nov 5, 2002Scott D. AndersenShock absorbing skate truck assembly
US20140306411 *Dec 16, 2013Oct 16, 2014Skateone Corp.Skateboard and skateboard truck
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.28
International ClassificationA63C17/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/02
European ClassificationA63C17/02