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Publication numberUS2330530 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1943
Filing dateAug 12, 1939
Priority dateAug 12, 1939
Publication numberUS 2330530 A, US 2330530A, US-A-2330530, US2330530 A, US2330530A
InventorsJohn N Tuttle
Original AssigneeGlassine Paper Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper laminating machine
US 2330530 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 28,1943. J. N. TUTTLE PAPER LAMINATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 12, 1939 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 M rcwfw? J; an mmqs By M a v lira F7 7 Sept. 28, 1943.

J. N. TUTTLE PAPER LAMINATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 12, 1939 '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 v v a a m M 4, WN llllm m WMN Qww W g w N N Sept. 28, 1943.

J. N. TUTTLE PAPER LAMINATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 12, 1939 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 @igw Sept. 28, 1943. J. N. TUTTLE 2,330,530

PAPER LAMINATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 12,-1939 Sheets-Sheet 5 .'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIA @L (ERA/awf- Sept. 28, 1943. J. N. TUTTLE PAPER LAMINATING MACHINE Filed Aug 12, 19:59 '7 Sheets-Sheet e Sept. 28, 1943. J. N. TUTTLE PAPER LAMINATING MACHINE Filed Aug 12. 1939 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Illlllllllll l V MIG/WW 7a 62? A2172: 19

Mme-as,- W

Patented Sept. 28, 1943 PAPER LAMINATING MACHINE John N. Tuttle, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor to The Glassine Paper Company, West Conshohocken, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Application August 12, 1939, Serial No. 289,740

Claims.

This inventionrelates to a paper laminating machine, and has particular reference to a machine adapted to .control sheets of paper to a high degree of precision so -as to produce satis' factory high grade products even when laminating materials normally diflicult to handle.

In the patents to Beecher 1,936,375, Nelson 1,965,719 and Connor 2,128,739, there are described methods and apparatus for the laminating of glassine paper by the use of wax or resinous materials. Such laminated products are useful particularly in the packaging of foodstuffs, in which case theglassine not only contributes its property of grease resistance, but also serves to provide an attractive package of transparent or semi-transparent nature through which the contents may be'viewed, Such a transparent package must make an attractive appearance, and consequently, the laminated glassine used for its construction must not only be without flaws initially, but it must also, stand up under conditions of exposure and use without separation of its constituent plies. Various other uses of laminated glassine, for example, in the making of lampshades, require it to be substantially without flaws.

each other, for example, glassine or Cellophane to heavier papers.

The various subsidiary objects of the invention relate to the provision of fine adjustments to secure equal or properly related tensions of various sheets which are being laminated; the adjustment of such sheets .to insure uniform stresses to avoid subsequent breaking apart of the plies, or curling; the control of the adhesive supplied to the sheets, not only from a mechanical standpoint, but also from the standpoint of temperature and resulting viscosity; and the 'The production of substantialy perfect glassine requires careful control of numerous factors entering into its formation',.for example, the V careful control of the amount of adhesive material applied to the glassine sheets, of the speeds of feed, and the tensions on the sheets, and of the handling of the heated laminated product through the cooling stages. ful handling occurs throughout the manufacture, separation of the plies may occur with the appearance of bubbles, either initially or by setting up of difierential stresses upon standing or handling of the product made up of sheets which were treated differently during the laminating process.

It is a general object of the present invention to provide a machine adapted for close control of all of the factors which enter into the production of a product such as laminated glassine. It will be evident that the improved machine may be used for the laminating or mere coating of other types of papers; but throughout the following description, the lamination of glassine will be particularly stressed because, by reason of its transparency, flaws in the finished product are particularly noticeable and must be avoided.. The machine is also adapted for the lamination of sheets such as those composed of Cellophane. Different types of sheets may be laminated to Unless such care-' provision for fine adjustment of pressures upon the sheets in the region where they are secured together.

The above and otherobjects of the invention, particularly relatingto details of construction and detailed features of control, will become apparent from the-following description, read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in

which: a v.

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic elevation showing particularly the various actions of parts of the machine on component papers of a laminated product;

Figure 2 is an elevation of the major portion of the machine with some parts broken away to show details;

Figure 3 is a sectional elevation showing means for controlling the take-up of a finished laminated product;

' Figure 4 is 'a plan view of a heating and recirculating arrangement for adhesive or coating material;

Figure 5 is a sectional elevation of the same;

Figure 6 is a sectional elevation showing particularly the laminating rollers and associated devices;

Figure 7 is a sectional plan view of the same;

Figure 8 is a transverse section showing particularly a scraping device associated with a guiding roller;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary elevation illustrating means for adjusting certain guiding rollers;

Figure 10 is a vertical section of the same matter;

Figure 11 is a horizontal section taken on the plane indicated at I l-- of Figure 9;

Figure 12 is a sectional elevation showing particularly the means for controlling a roll of paper which supplies the machine;

Figure 13 is a horizontal section showing a bearing mounting therefor;

Figure 14 is a vertical section taken on the plane indicated at I l-l4 of Figure 12;

Figure 14A is avertical section taken on the plane indicated at. I4A-I4A of Figure 12;

Figure 15 is a. sectional fragmentary elevation showing particularly means for controlling the distribution and application of adhesive to a sheet of P p Figure 16 is .a fragmentary plan view showing particularly the means for controlling the application of adhesive to the edges of a sheet; and

Figure 17 is a fragmentary plan view showing the means for mounting and heating an equalizer.

Referring first to Figure 1, there will be clear from consideration of this figure the fashion in which sheets to be laminated are handled and the nature of the adjustments which are provided in the machine, the directions in which various supply rolls and handling rollers may be adjusted being indicated by arrows. On shafts 2, 4, 6 an 8 are mounted supp rolls of paper indicated at I0, I2, I4 and I6, respectively. As illustrated, all four of these sheets have adhesive applied to them and the product is a four-ply laminated material. An additional ply (indicated in chain lines in Figure 1) may be inserted between the two inner plies without the application of adhesive thereto, since it will contact with adhesive coated surfaces of the two inner plies. If such a, fifth ply is fed, a five-ply paper will result.

Adhesive is applied to the various sheets illustrated by rollers I8, 20, 22 and 24, respectively, which run in baths of adhesive contained in tanks 26, 28, 30 and 32. The sheet l passes to its adhesive applying roller I8 after passing over controlling and smoothing rollers 34 and 36, the latter of which rollers may be abrasive and driven opposite the direction of movement of the sheet to roughen the surface and thereby promote adhasion. After contacting with the roller I8, it enases the equalizer rod 38, whence it passes beneath a controlling roller 40 between the laminating rollers 42 and 44. At this-point it meets the other-sheets and passes with them between the roller 42 and roller 46. The roller 42 has a metallic surface, while the rollers 44 and 46 are desirably rubber faced.

In similar fashion, the sheet I2 passes about the guiding rollers 48 and 50, then in contact with its adhesive applying, roller 20 and thence over the equalizer 52 and beneath the controlling roller 64.

Sheet I4 likewise passes about the rollers 56 and 58, its adhesive applyin roller 22, its equalizer 60 and its controlling roller 62. Similar rollers 64 and 66, equalizer 68 and roller I0 control the passage and condition of the fourth sheet I6.

The laminated product 12 passing from the rollers 42, 44 and 46 extends about the chilling drums" andl6andiswounduponareelindicated at 86 on the shaft I8.

The take-up action of the reel 80 is effected by the means indicated inFigure 3. A shaft 82, which is positively driven, a indicated hereafter, is provided with a pulley driving arbelt 84, which extends about a pulley 86 on the shaft I8. A take-up roller 88 engaging the belt 84 is carried by a bell crank 80, the position of which may be adjusted b a. screw and nut arrangement indicated at 92. The shaft 18 would be driven, if the belt did not slip, at a speed such that the periphery of the wheel would be moving faster than the supply of laminated material, even when the reel had a minimum diameter. Proper slippageandadesiredtensionwonthelaminated product are secured by adjustment of roller 88.

iii)

By this means a quite accurate adjustment of the pull on the laminated product may be secured.

The shaft 82 carries a pinion 94 meshing with I a gear 96 which in turn is connected with a pinion 98 driving the meshing gears I00 and I02 secured to the shafts of the chilling drum l4 and 16. Thus these drums are driven at predetermined speed during the cooling of the laminated product, as is necessary for satisfactory results, particularlyin the handling of thin papers to avoid tendency toward curling. The drums I4 and I6 may be cooled by water circulation if necessary.

While the machine is well adapted for the applicaticn of adhesive at room temperature, in general, particularly in the laminating of glassine, it is desirable to appl adhesive at an elevated temperature. For example, the adhesive may be a wax or other thermoplastic material, or may be a material-such as a. resin or rubber composition in solution in a volatile solvent, which is desirably applied in heated condition so that rapid evaporation of the solvent will take place, and accordingly so that laminating may be accomplished quite rapidly. For this reason, there is supplied an adhesive tank I04 jacketed as indicated at I06 so that its contents may be heated by steam or other medium passing through the jacket by way of the openings I08 and H0. A valve controlled drain indicated at II2 may be provided for the tank. Within the tank there is located a pump II4 which may be of centrifugal type driven b a motor I I6. The pump I I4 is arrangedto deliver the adhesive to the various tanks 26, 28, 30 and 32 through pipe connections indicated at I I8. In order to control the delivery and also provide recirculation within the tank, there is a bypass connection I20 adapted to bypass some of the liquid delivered by the pump through a valve indicated at I22. By adjustment of this valve, a desired proportion of the liquid may be recirculated within the tank I04, to effect a stirring action, the remainder of the liquid being delivered to the adhesive applying tanks. New

makeup material may be delivered to the tankrequirements, and consequently continuous overflow taka place, so that recirculation is effected to maintain uniformity of temperature and composition of the adhesive material as it is applied to the paper. The various tanks 26, 28, 30 and 32 are preferably jacketed as indicated at I26 so as to be heated to a proper temperature by a suitable medium, such as steam. Preferably, the heating medium to these tanks, as well as to the tank I04, is thermostatically controlled, since for best results a given amount of adhesive must be applied to the paper within a relatively narrow range of temperature. If small tank 26, 28, 30 and 32 are used they may be heated only in starting up the apparatus.

Front and rear bracket I28 and I30 are provided to support the suppl rolls of paper and the details of the mountings of these rolls are specifically illustrated in Figures 12 to 14A, inclusive, in which there are detailed the elements correspending to the roll I0.

The shaft 2 which carries this roll is mounted The feed in front and rear bearing members carried by the front and rear brackets I28 and I30, respectively. The rear bearing comprises a sliding block I32 mounted on the bracket I30 forsliding movements transverse to the direction of the shaft 2. This block is located in adjusted position by means of a screw I34 mounted in the bracket and member I42 secured in position to embrace the shaft by a thumb screw I40. By reason of these arrangements it will be evident that the rear end of the shaft may be adjusted transversely, while the forward bearing will permit such transverse movement to take place without binding of the shaft in its bearings and about the pin I36 as a pivot.

At its forward end the shaft 2 is provided with a grooved disc I44 about which the elements I46 of a brake may be adjustably clamped by means of a screw arrangement indicated at I41. Thus adjustable friction may be applied to the disc I44 to retard free movement of the shaft 2 to a predetermined degree. engaged between collars on a screw I50 which threads into an extension I48 of the front hearing I32. The screw I50 is provided with a hand wheel I52 so that it may be threaded into or out of the extension I48. Thus the brake is moved axially and by its movement the shaft 2 is moved axially. The brake, therefore, not only serves to effect control of the tension on the paper, but also effects axial control and adjustment of the shaft.

Rolls of paper I are secured on the shaft 2 by means of the conventional split cones indicated at I54, secured to the shaft by set screws.

The preliminary controlling rollers. such as 34 and 36, are adjustable in pairs and their mountings and adjustments will be apparent from Figures 9, and 11, which show particularly the elements associated with. rollers 34 and 36 which handle sheet I0. These rollers are mounted by.

means of'roller bearings indicated at I56 upon rods I58, which are carried at the front and back The brake members I46 areelements associated with the adhesive applying roller I8. The brackets I10 are provided in pairs zit-opposite ends of the rollers and each is slotted I as indicated at I12 to receive a stud I14 extending from an equalizer supporting member I16.

The upper end of the member I16 is recessed to receive a plate I18 between the end of which and another plate I80 set at an angle with respect thereto, as illustrated in Figure 15, there lies an equalizer rod I84 in position to be rotated by the paper. This equalizer rod I84 may be of the type illustrated in Moller Patent 1,853,569, dated April 12, 1932, and consists of a circular rod about which is wound a wire the convolutions of which are. in contact with each other. As is well known in the art, by proper choice of the wire wound about the; equalizer rod a very accurate control of the amount of adhesive material applied to the paper is provided. This rod I84 may be rotated merely by contact with the paper, or alternatively, it may be positively drivenat a suitable rate of speed. Rotation, however, is not absolutely essential, though it is desirable to provide even wear of the wire wound on the rod and its longer life. Each of the equalizer rods heretofore mentioned, i. e., 38, 52, 60 and 68, has this same construction.

The end of the 'member I16 below the plate I80 is slotted, as indicated at I82, to provide passages for return of excess adhesive to the surface of the roller I8 and thence to the tank 26.

6f the machine by vertically adjustable slides 60.

ments of the pair of rollers may be provided. the

adjustments being maintained by suitable ratchet arrangements I69. By their adjustment. arcuate control of the direction of feed of the corr sponding sheets to the adhesive applying rollers may be obtained. a

The rollers corresponding to 36, i. e., 36, 50, 58 and 66, may be of abrasive nature so as to abrade the surface of ahighly calendered paper to en able the adhesive to bind more-securely the plies of the product. In such case, the roll may be driven opposite the direction of movement of the paper by any suitable means.

Mounted on the bearings of the shafts of the adhesive applying rollers for adjustment about the axis of these rollers are bracket members indicated at I10 in Figure 15, which, together with Figures 16 and 1'7, relates primarily to those It is important that the equalizer rod be maintained at a proper temperature to function properly. Accordingly, the member I16 is provided. with an inset heating tube I86 through which heating fluid, for example, steam or, desirably, oil, at properly controlled temperature, may be circulated. A single turn of such tube is found .sufiicient, particularly if the heating is effected through the means of circulating oil maintained at proper-temperature. The lower end of the member I16 is preferably turned, as indicated, forthe purpose of securing rigidity to avoid bowing of this member and its .equalizer rod under the pressure of a paper web.

In order to avoid troublesome distribution of adhesive at the edges of the laminated product and flow of the adhesive over the surfaces of the laminated rollers, it is desirable to avoid to as greater degree as possible the application of adhesive at the margin of a sheet. For this purpose at each end of the adhesive applying roller I8 and underlapping the sheet fed thereto there is a blade I88 adjustably securable upon a fixed rod I90 by means of a clamping screw I92. This blade engages the adhesive applying roller I8, scraping therefrom the adhesive material and also lifting its edge of the sheet slightly above the adhesive applying roller to thereby prevent application of adhesive to the margin.

Referring now to Figures 6 and '1, there are illustrated therein the various means for adjusting the actual laminating pressure rollers 42, 44 and 46. Referring first to the rubber faced roll' 44, it is journalled in bearing blocks I94 and I96 adapted to slide transversely on tracks I98 and 200,- which extend on opposite sides of the roller 42 so that the rubber roller may be located on either side thereof. Threaded into extensions of these blocks I94 and I are screws 202 and 204. The screw 202 is driven through hand wheel 2I0. The screw 204 is in turn driven through bevel gears 2I2 by means of the shaft 2" passing through the shaft 208 and carrying a crank 2l6 adapted to be rotated by means of a handle 2l8. The crank 216 may be clamped to the hand wheel 2i by means illustrated at 220. When this means is freed, however, the hand wheel and crank may be independently adjusted.

Thus it will be evident that the. two ends of the roller 44 may be independently adjusted with respect to the .roller 42, while. when the crank and hand wheel are clamped together the roller 44 may be moved bodily relative to the roller 42. Thus a fine control of the pressure between these rollers may be secured and may be varied along the length thereof.

The roller 46 is similarly adjustable for vertical movement. It is mounted in the bearing blocks 222 and 224 slidable on vertical track members 226 and 228. Adjustment of these bearing blocks is efiected in the same fashion as adjustment of the bearing blocks I94 and I96 through the medium of the hand wheel 230 and crank wheel 232, which may be independently adjusted or simultaneously adjusted by clamping them together by the means indicated at 234.

The roller 40 which controls the sheet I0 is also adjustable both horizontally and vertically by the means illustrated in the lower portion of Figure 6. As shown therein, the roller is freely mounted on a rod extending between blocks 236 and 238 vertically adjustable in supporting members 244 and 246 by means of screws 240 and 242, respectively. The members 244 and 246 are in turn horizontally adjustable on tracks 248 and 250, to which they are clamped in fixed position by suitable screws.-

In view of the minute holes which generally occur in papers, some adhesive may pass through the paper engaging the roller and the corresponding rollers, and consequently each of these is provided with a scraping device in the nature of a blade 252 extending lengthwise of the roller and adjustably supported by means of a pair of arms indicated at 254, as illustrated in Figure 8. These blades serve to remove the small amounts of adhesive material which may pass through the paper.

Returning to Figure 2, there are illustrated therein the various driving devices for the parts of the machine. A pulley driven by a motor or other source of power is indicated at 256. This drives at suitable speed a. cone pulley 258 about which and a cooperating cone pulley 262 secured to shaft 82 is trained a shiftable driving belt 260. Through suitable gearing there is driven the vertical shaft 264 which drives through a worm and wheel connection the steel roller 42, the rollers 44 and 46 being driven through the paper from this roller. By means of link belts there is also driven the adjustable speed device indicated at 266, the driven member of which is connected to the gear box 268 from which extend chain drives to the adhesive applying rollers I8, 20, 22 and 24. Thus the steel roller 42 is driven at a substantially constant speed while the adhesive applying rollers I8, 20, 22 and 24 are driven at variable speeds relatively to the paper pulled through the machine by the roller 42 to secure the desired application of adhesive. The speed of shaft 82 may also be varied with respect to the speed of roller 42 by shift of belt 260 on the cone pulleys 262 and 258.

If heated adhesives are used, for example, molthroughout the operation. To this end rolls i8, 20, 22 and 24 and the steel roll 42 are heated with the same hot oil which is used to heat the equalizer rods. Connections for the circulation of the hot oil may, in all cases, be along the lines indicated in connection with roller 42 in Figures 6 and '7. In the case of roller 42, there extends through its hollow shaft into the roller a tube 210, into whichthe heated oil is introduced. Return flow takes place about the tube into a box 212 surrounding one end of its shaft, and thence returns through the pipe 214 to the supply. The 011 thus circulated through roller 42 and similarly through the adhesive applying rollers and the equalizers may have its temperature thermostatically controlled to insure the proper application of the adhesive.

While there is illustrated in Figure 1 the arrangement of the machine for the lamination of sheets such, for example, as glassine paper, the parts of the machine may be rearranged for the proper handling of other materials which are to be laminated and/or coated. Some materials, for example, uch as cardboard, could not be given a turn of small radius such as indicated in Figure l, and if, for example, glassine or similar thin paperis to be laminated to cardboard, or the like, the roller 44 may be withdrawn from cooperation with roller 42 and may serve as a guide roller to feed cardboard through the nip of rollers 42 and 46, the feed being so arranged that curvatures of small radii are avoided. It will be evident that the various adhesive applying arrangements may be associated in various combinations.

The various adjustments which are provided and which have been described are designed to insure uniform, flawless lamination, particularly in cases, such as the lamination of glassine, in which flaws would be highly objectionable. By the adjustment of temperatures and speeds of rotation of the adhesive applying rollers, as well as by adjustment of the equalizer rods, such as 38, the amount of adhesive applied to the paper may be readily controlled. Further, control is effected by the proper location of preliminary guiding rollers, such as 34 and 36, which determine the angle of approach of the paper to the adhesive applying roller. The pressure of the paper on the equalizer and the arc of its contact therewith may be adjusted by the vertical adjustment of a roller such as 40, while horizontal adjustment of this roller determines the angle of approach of the sheet to the nip of rollers 42 and 44. The adjustment of the shaft 2 and corresponding shafts carryingthe supply rolls makes possible not only fine adjustment of the paper to insure smooth and proper feed through the apparatus, but makes it possible to adjust the various sheets transversely to cause their edges to meet properly when they are brought together. The adjustments of the rollers 46 and 44 relative to the steel roller 42 will be readily seen to afford close control of the pressures on the laminations throughout their width. Thus wide sheets may be readily laminated together with uniform thickness throughout their widths. Other adjustments to insure uniformity across the width of wide webs are afforded by the mountings of the equalizers.

' The proper control of the speed of the chilling rolls 74 and I6 is also desirable to secure a satisfactory product. Fine control of the speed of these rolls is effected through the use of the cone pulleys over which the belt 266 runs.

What I claim and desire to protect by Letters I Patent is:

1. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a metal roller, means for driving said metal roller, and a resilient roller arranged to press together and against said metal roller a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, said resilient roller being rotatable solely under the action of said webs and during its rotation being locally compressed, thereby constituting a load upon said driving means applied through said webs.

2. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a metal roller, means for driving said metal roller, and a resilient roller arranged to press together and against said metal roller a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, the ends of the axis of said resilient roller being independently adjustable towards and from the axis of said metal roller;

3. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a metal roller, means for driving said metal roller, and a plurality of resilient rollers arranged to press together and against said metal roller a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, said resilient rollers being rotatable solely under the action of said webs and during their. rotation being locally compressed, thereby constituting loads upon said driving means applied through said webs.

4. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a metal roller, means for driving said metal roller, and a plurality of 'resilient rollers arranged to press together and against said metal roller a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, the ends of the axis of each of said resilient rollers being independently adjustable towards and from the axis of said metal roller.

5. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a plurality of rollers arranged to press together a'plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, means for applying adhesive to the webs comprising a roller, and an equalizer rod, and means for adjusting said equalizer rod about the axis of said adhesive applying roller at a substantially constant distance from said axis.

6. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a plurality of rollers arranged to press together a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, means for applying adhesive to the webs, and means for adjusting supply rolls of web materials axially with respect to each other,.the last named means comprising braking means for the supply rolls, means for adjusting the tensions imparted by the braking means, and means for adjusting the braking means axially to adjust said supply rolls therewith.

7. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a plurality of rollers arranged to press together a plurality of-said webs having adhesive between them, means for applying adhesive to the webs, and means for adjusting at least one supply roll of web material axially with respect to the other, the last named means comprising a grooved member secured to the supply roll, means engaging within the groove of said member, and means for moving the last named means, and with it the supply roll, axially.

8. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a plurality of rollers arranged to press together a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, means for applying adhesive to the webs comprising a roller, an equalizer rod, a massive metallic carrier for the equalizer rod provided said rod rests and rotates, and means for heating said carrier, and through it by conduction from said socket, said equalizer rod.

- 9. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper or the like comprising a plurality of rollers arranged to press together a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, means for applying adhesive to the webs, and means for abrading, before it reaches said adhesive applying means, the side to which adhesive is to be applied of at least one of said webs.

10. An apparatus for laminating webs of paper "or the like comprising a plurality of rollers arranged to press together a plurality of said webs having adhesive between them, means 'for applying adhesive to the webs comprising a roller, and means for adjusting the path of approach of at least one of said webs to an adhesive applying roller, said means-comprising a plurality of rollers adjustable asa unit in a direction transverse to the path of approach of the web to the adhesive applying roller.

JOHN N. TU'I'ILE.

with a.socket in which

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2501155 *May 4, 1944Mar 21, 1950Metals & Controls CorpThermostatic circuit breaker
US2568463 *Oct 23, 1946Sep 18, 1951Reynolds Metals CoMethod of adhering metal foil to nonmetallic carrying webs
US2631641 *Jun 4, 1949Mar 17, 1953Robertson Co H HMethod of and apparatus for producing protected metal articles
US2712342 *Mar 2, 1950Jul 5, 1955M B Claff & Sons IncLaminating machine for producing composite webs of paper
US2764808 *Jan 22, 1952Oct 2, 1956Robertson Co H HMethod of producing a protected metal article
US2800946 *Jan 29, 1953Jul 30, 1957Champion Paper & Fibre CoLaminating method and apparatus
US3032006 *Dec 22, 1958May 1, 1962Olin MathiesonWeb treatment
US3844252 *May 21, 1973Oct 29, 1974Xerox CorpSheet removal device
US4806183 *Sep 18, 1987Feb 21, 1989Consolidated Papers, Inc.Method of and apparatus for controlling application of glue to defined areas
US7241355 *Sep 3, 2000Jul 10, 2007Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Laminated image printing method
DE959880C *May 8, 1953Mar 14, 1957Werner AchillesFolien-Kaschiermaschine
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/495, 118/118, 156/551, 118/235, 118/220, 118/211, 118/202, 118/33, 118/70
Cooperative ClassificationB32B37/226