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Publication numberUS2330880 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1943
Filing dateJul 16, 1940
Priority dateJul 16, 1940
Publication numberUS 2330880 A, US 2330880A, US-A-2330880, US2330880 A, US2330880A
InventorsWiltie I Gladfelter, Carl C H Hauger
Original AssigneeCrown Cork & Seal Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coating machine
US 2330880 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 5, 1943. y w. GLADFELTER -E-r m. 2,330,380

' COATING MACHINE- Filed July 1s. 1940 ssneets-sneet 1 lai/3.1.

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COATING MACHINE y Filed July 16, 1940 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 Carr-l C'. H. Haager 3mm/MQ 9 sheets-sheet v" COATING MACHINE Filed July 16.- 1940 0i/fie I. G/a'ctlfe/er Car/ C'. H. Haager @M W. l. GLADFELTER ET AL Oct. 5, 1943.

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comme MACHINE Filed July 16. 1940 9 sheets-sheet 9 Xmwm "www Patented Oct. 5, 1943 vui'rsn STATESI PATENT oF-FICE COATm G MACHINE wilde r. Gladfeiter ana can c. n. Hanger, Phila'- delphja, Pa., asslgnors to Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc., Baltimore, Md., a corporation of New York Application .my 16, 1940, serial No. 345,832

is claims. (ci. er1-'45) It is a further object of the invention to provide K a machine of this class that will operate continuously over long periods of time, without interruption for adjustment or repair, whereby the containers in a container manufacturing line may-be coated at the same speed as the other operations in the line are performed.

Itis a, further object of the invention to provide novel means for handling the containers, to prevent scratching thereof prior to the coating operation, and to prevent marring or smearing of the coated surfaces, during and after the coating operation. To this end. it is an object `of the invention to provide transfer dials which firmly grip the containers and prevent rubbing of the side walls of the containers with guide rails or the like.

It is a. .further object to provide novel means for supporting the containers during the coating operation, so that all surfaces of the containers are exposed a plurality of times to the coating instrumentalities. A :further object is to provide improved means for supporting the containers and rotating them about their own axes, as they are moved along a predetermined path past the coating instrumentalities, such as spray guns or the like, and to provide means for non-rotatably supporting the containers at the infeed and outfeed stations. Y

It is a further object to provide continuously operating spray-coating means, which will not Y become clogged or otherwise rendered inefficient To accomplish this by continuous operation. object, the inventionprovides a plurality of spray guns, or the like, and means for periodically and alternately rendering the individual guns operative, so that each gun operates for a. predetermined time, followed by a period of rest, during which the gun is automatically cleared for subsequent eiilcient operation.

Other and further objects and advantages of il.

the invention will be apparent from the following description of a. specific embodiment of the invention, reference being had to the accompanying drawings which are illustrative of the invention.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the apparatus, withv the table enclosing hood removed for the sake of clarity.

Figure 2 is a vertical view, partly in section and partly in elevation, taken substantially on line 2 2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is an enlarged horizontal section and plan view, taken on line 3 3 of Figure 2. i

Figure 4 is a horizontal section on line 4 4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a similar view taken on line 5-5 of Figure 2.

Figure 6 is a horizontal sectional detail of an air valve structure.

Figure 71s a fragmentary elevation of the device of Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a vertical section taken through the infeed and outfeed dials looking toward the machine oi' Figure `1.

Figure l91 is an enlarged elevation, partly in section, showing a preferred spray gun supporting means.

Figure 10 is a. plan view of shown in Figure 9..

Figure 11 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially on line lI-II of Figure 1, showing a preferred form of article supporting lchuck with the parts in `one position. .f

Figure 12 is a partial elevation and partial secthe construction tion showing the elements of- Figure 11 in another position.

Figure 13 is a horizontal section taken substantially on line l3-I3 of Figure 12.

Figure 14 is an enlarged plan view, partly in elevation. taken substantially on line `2li- 2110i Figure 19. y

Figure 21 is a fragmentary elevation of the hood taken from the opposite side thereof.

, and the infeed and outfeed dials 2|,

member.

General description Although not confined to such use, the machine of the present invention is particularly adapted to apply a coating of lacquer or varnish to the exterior surfaces of containers of the type disclosed in the application of Calleson and Calleson, Serial No. 334,876, iiled May 13, 1940. In the embodiment illustrated, the containers have previously had the bottom end members seamed thereon, but it should be understood that the coating machine may be used to coat the containers before the end members are applied. As illustrated in Figure 1, the containers are moved along an infeed conveyor 20 which, in the embodiment illustrated, comprises. an articulated chain, but since the conveyor forms no part of the invention it need not be described in detail. An infeed dial 2| of speciaiconstruction, hereinafter described, transfers the containers from the conveyor 2|) to chucks 22 associated with a rotatable table 23. The containers are carried by the chucks along a circular path past spray guns 24, 25 to receive a coating of lacquer or varnish from the guns, the chucks and the containers being rapidly rotated about their vertical axes during this movement by means hereinafter described. After the cans have been coated, they are removed from the supporting chucks 22 by a special outfeed dial 26, hereinafter described in detail, and transferred to an outfeed conveyor 21, which, in the preferred embodiment, is a continuation of the infeed conveyor 20.

Supporting frame and main drive The machine base comprises an upwardly opening casing 30 having a bottom wall 3|, a front wall 32, side walls 33, 34 and an upstanding, arcuate, rear end walll 35, reference being had to Figures 2 and 5. Integral downwardly projecting bosses 36 receive legs 31 which may be adjustably mounted in pedestals 38 or thelike. The bottom and side walls of the casing are provided .with suitable reinforcing ribs 39 to impart the desired strength and rigidity to the main frame. The upper open end of the main frame 32 is closed by a bed plate 4b, having its lateral edges 4| supported upon the upper edges of the side and end walls, as indicated in Figure 2. The bed plate, likewise, is provided with radially disposed, tapering reinforcing ribs or flanges 42, extending toward the edges thereof. The casing and bed plate are provided with a plurality of aligned apertures, in which vertical shafts 43, 44,I 45 and4 46 are journalled for rotation. Shafts 43, 44 and 45, respectively, carry the table 23 26, while shaft 46 carries a driving pinion 41 at its upper end and is connected at its lower end to an appropriate driving motor 4B by any suitable speed reducing mechanism, not shown.

Shafts 44 and 45 additionally carry spur gears 49, 50, in mesh with a large gear secured to the table actuating shaft 43, whereby the infeed and outfeed dials and the table are rotated in predetermined ratio, at the same peripheral speed, the gears 49, 5D being equal in radius to the transfer dials and the gear 5| being equal in radius to the distance from the center of the table to the centers of the can-supporting chucks. Driving gear 41 is in mesh with the gear 49,

whereby rotation is imparted to all of the gears and shafts.

The table and chuck assemblies vare a plurality of circumferentially spaced openings 63 defined by cylindrical flanges 64, projecting above and below the table, reference being had to Figures 2, 11 and 12. The openings in the table receive the chuck assemblies 22, described below.

Above the table 23 and forming a part of the assembly, there is positioned a panv structure, comprising two semicircular sections 65, centrally supported upon the hub 60 and provided with anged openings 86, embracing the chuck assemblies 23, as shown in Figures 11 and 12. Only a fragment of one pan section 65 is illustrated in Figure 1, the remainder being removed for the sake of clarity, but it will be understood that the pan is coextensive in area with the table and is spaced thereabove.

The table and the elements carried thereby are enclosed by a hood structure represented generally at 52 and described below, a -preferred form `of hood being shown in'Figures 19-23. The hood is provided with openings in its side wall for the spray projected inwardly by the exteriorly supported`guns and with entrance and exit openings for the containers adjacent the infeed and outfeed dials.

The chuck assemblies 22 which receive the containers from the infeed dial 2|, described below, are illustrated in Figures 11 and 12 and reference is made thereto. Each assembly comprises a stationary sleeve 61 disposed within the opening 63 and having an outwardly projecting flange 69 overlying one of the cylindrical flanges 64 of .the table. The sleeve is preferably clamped in place by a ring 39 below the opening in the table and secured by bolts 1D.- Upon the flange 68 of the sleeve 51, there is secured by 'any appropriate means, a second sleeve member 1|, closely fitting within the flanged opening 36 of the pan 65, the sleeve being provided at its upper end with van inwardly and upwardly tapering portion 12,

providing a seat for the double seam 15 at the bottom end of the container 16. Of course, if the bottom end member has not been seemed to the container, the seat 12 will engage the margins of the outwardly turned seeming flange of the can body.

The first stationarysleeve 61 and the ring 8B carry the outer races of bearing assemblies 1B, 19, spaced apart by a collar 83 and in which a hollow spindle 8| is journalled. The spindle carries at its lower end a pulley or sheave 82, while an oilvpacking 83 is interposed between the hollow spindle and the ring 89.

A rod. 84, slldably mounted for longitudinal movement in the hollowinterior of the spindle 8 l is urged upwardly by a coil compression spring 85, disposed in an enlarged portion of the bore and bearing upwardly against the central sleeve head 88, the latter being provided v .hollow spindle 8| and the pulley 82 are mounted for rotation relative to the sleeves 61 and 1|, but

are restrained against longitudinal movement with respect thereto by bearings'18, 19 and clamping ring 68, while the shaft 84 which rotates with the hollow spindle and forms a part of the spindle assembly, togetherwith the skirted head I8 and the magnetized ring 82 are mounted for limited longitudinal movement with respect to the stationary sleeves and the can seat 12. The means for controlling the longitudinal movements of these parts will now be described.

Adjacent each chuck holding aperture 63, there is a depending bracket 95 having at its lower end a substantially radially disposed bore 88 provided with a bearing sleeve 91 in which a rock shaft 98 is journalled. An arm 98, carrying a cam following roller |00, is secured to one end of the rock shaft and a 4shifting fork |0| is secured to the other end thereof. The shifting fork carries inwardly projecting pins |02, |03 at its ends. disposed in a peripheral groove |04, in a shifting collar |05 fast upon the lower end-of the shaft 84. The cam following roller 00, journalled upon a pin |06. isl disposed beneath a'downwardly facing cam |01 carried by an upwardly projecting;

arcuate bracket |08, supported by the bed plate 40 of the machine and extending between the-infeed and outfeed positions, as indicated in Figures 1, 2 and 11.

Thus, as the table rotates, the cam rollers |08 associated with the several chuck assemblies, pass under the cam |01, as they approach the outfeed station. The cam forces the arm 98 downwardly and, by means of the rock shaft 98,

lowers the shifting fork 0| the grooved shifte ing collar |05the central shaft 84 of the spindle assembly, and the head 88 and the magnetized ring 92. Hence, the parts are drawn downwardly to the position shown in Figure 11, when they reach the infeed station, and containers may be positioned by the infeed dial upon the seats 12,

, to be supported thereby alongthe margins of the containers. v-As the .rotation of the table continues, the rollers pars from under the end of the cam |01, with the result that the springs 85 force the vheads 88 and the associated `parts upwardly, to the position shown in Figure 12, so that the magneticed rings 82 are projected upwardly into the concave lower ends of the associated containers to support the same a slight dis- Y tance above the relatively stationary seats `12.

.When in'this position, the chuck spindles and the containers supported thereby are rapidly rotated about their own axes as the table conveys them past the spray guns 24, 25.

l The chuck spindle drive As pointedl out above, each spindle sleeve 8| carries adjacent its lower end, a pulley 82, the' lar path of movement of the spindle pulleys 82. An endless belt ||2 is trained about the sheaves ||0, and about allof the pulleys 82 on-the opposite side of the machine, as shown in Figures a 1, 3 and 4. A tension sheave H3, carried by a shaft I i4, may be adjusted relative to the sheaves H0, to apply the desired tension to the belt. The sheaves ||0, have spur gears ||5, secured to their lower faces, in mesh with spur gears l0 H8, journalled upon counter-shafts ||-1 and having smaller spur gears i I8 secured to their lower faces, the latter being in mesh with gears ||8 'pinned to the spider shafts 44, 45. The' gear ratio, as indicated in-Figure 8, is preferably such.

l that the sheaves ||0, lil rotate suby tantially four times as fast as the spider shafts 44, 45, in the same direction as the shafts. `Thrust bearings |20, |2| carry the load of the gear train, the Y sheaves I0, Il l and the infeed and outfeed spiders.

'I'he belt ||2 is continuously driven at a relatively rapid speed during the operation of the machine. As the chuck assemblies leave the infeed station, with cans supported upon the fixed seats 12, the rotatable spindles are projected upwardly, as described above, to support the cans above the seats. When the chucks arrive substantially at the position indicated by the chuck y 22a, in Figures 1 and 3, the pulleys 82 are brought into contact with the 'belt 2, whereupon the pulleys; the spindles and the cans supported thereby are rapidly rotated. This rotation con- 82 are lowered, whereupon the containers are.

again supported upon the stationary seats 12. At this time, the outfeed dial, hereinafter described, grasps the cans and removes the coating machine.

The spray guns and their control means Y.

As the containers are rotated and carried along "n the table, their exterior surfaces are sprayed by theguns 24 or 25, or by other guns similarly positioned adjacent this path of movement. As indi. cated in Figures 1, 2, 9 and.10, these guns are of well known type, comprising a spray nozzle |25, a varnish or liquid inlet |28, an atomizing air inlet |21 and a second air -inlet |28 in the natureof a control line leading to a needle valve actuating cylinder (not shown) inthe body |29 of the gun. Since spray guns of this type are well known and do not, speciilcally,'form a part of the present invention, their structural details will fill not lbe described. When -the air in the line |2815 cut on, the needle valve is projected toclosed position, to interrupt the flow of atomizingair and the now of lacquer or varnish, as well as to lclear the lacquer or` `varnish delivery passage. In guns of this type,- this passage must be closed and cleared occasionally, to prevent clogging thereof and to avoid variations in the character of the spray produced.

Automatic means are provided for performing this function. As shown in Figures 2 and 5-7,

'the air line |28 from the gun 25 leads to a valve 7,5 |88 carried beneaththe machine casing 3|, -while them from the path of movement defined by the rotation of the corresponding line from the gun 24 leads to a similar valve |34. A cam |35, carried by the lower end of the table shaft 43, serves to actuate the valves periodically and substantially in alternation, to effect corresponding operation of the spray guns.

As shown in Figures 6 and 7, each valve assembly comprises a casing |36 having an inletl passage |31 connected to a source of compressed air and an outlet passage |38 connected to the pipe leading to the inlet of the spray gun. Springpressed valve bodies |39, |40 are mounted for reciprocating movement in the aforesaid passages, on pins |4|, |42 which extend through the casing |30 into proximity to a cam following lever |43, pivoted at |44 and having a cam following roller |45 on one end. A tension spring |46, connected to the other end of the lever, normally urges the same into the position shown in full lines in Figure 6, where the valve |39 in the passage leading from the source of compressed air is closed by its spring, while the valve |40 in the delivery passage is open, thereby permitting a back now of air through that line from the gun tov relieve the pressure in the gun through the exhaust port |41, in the side of the valve casing |36. When the cam |35 shifts the lever to its other position, the valve |39 is opened, thereby permitting a flow of compressed air from the source, and the exhaust port |41 is closed by the valve |40, thereby causing the compressed air to ow to the gun, to open the needle valve and render the gun operative.

The cam profile and the angular relation of the valve assemblies are preferably such that there is a slight overlap between the time when one valve opens and the other closes. In other words, in their normal cycle of operation, the guns are operating slightly longer than not. Hence. there is no chance that any can will pass through the machine without being thoroughly sprayed by one gun or another.

It must be understood that the invention is not limited to the use of only two guns, as any desired number can be used, positioned at any desired circumferential location relative to the path of movement of the cans.

The rear, arcuate wall 35 of the main machine casing is turned inwardly, as indicated at |50 and is provided with an arcuate groove i! in its upper face. Arcuate track members |52, |53 (Fig. 9) are secured along and project inwardly over the margins of the groove and bolts |55, |55 having enlarged heads are disposed in the groove beneath the tracks. Each'pair of bolts |54, |55 extend upwardly .through a block |55, slidably mounted on the tracks |52. |55 and nuts |51, |50 securely clamp the blocks in place, in any desired circumferential position thereon. Laterally and upwardly projecting rods |59 are secured in hollow bores in the blocks by set screws |60 or the like. The spray guns 24, 25 are -mounted for universal adjustment on the upper ends of the rods |59 by clamps |55, each rotatably adjustable about the axis of the rods,

clamps, about which the guns are rotatably adlustable, being secured in place by set screws |61.

The infeed and outfeed dials As stated above, the containers are transferred from the conveyor chain 20 to the table' by an infeed dial 2| and are removed from the table and replaced upon the conyeyor by an outfeed dial 26. Since both dials have many features of construction in common, only. one will be described and the differences between the two then pointed out. 'I'he dials, mounted upon the upper ends of the rotating shafts 44, 45, each cnnpri'se a central hub |10 secured by bolts |1| to a flange |12 of a sleeve |13 carried by the shaft, the bolts being threaded into the llange |12 and disposed in elongated, arcuate slots |14 in the hub member, whereby the hub may be angularly adjusted relative to the supporting sleeve |13. The hub |10 is preferably a unitary casting having an upper annular portion |15. in which the aforesaid slots are arrangedand'in which vertical sleeves |16 are formed, the upper portion terminating at its outer margin in an annular edge or shoulder |11. Vertically disposed webs |18, depending from the upper portion |15, carry,

' at their lower ends, an inwardly projecting annular flange |19, provided with apertures |80 aligned with the sleeves |16. A lower ledge |8|,

-and by arms |65 projecting laterally from the positioned below the upper ledge |11, has threaded bolt holes |82 therein, disposed in alignment with similar holes |83 in the upper ledge |11. Upper and lower dial elements are secured to the upper andlower ledges |11, |0| by bolts threaded in the holes. As shown in Figures 1 and l5, the upper and lower dial elements |84, |85, associated with the infeed dial 2|, are provided with outwardly projecting arms |85 which are curved forwardly in the direction of rotation of the dial and which define article receiving pockets |81. The outfeed dial includes upper and lower dial plates |88, |89, which are somewhat similar i n construction, but which have arms |00 curved rearwardly with respect to the direction of rotation.

Vertically disposed rock shafts |06, journalled y for rotation in the sleeve |15 and aperture |80 in the hub |10, carry outwardly projecting movable arms |92, |95 disposed at an elevation substantially midway between the rigid arms |04, |05 and |85, |89, respectively. Each vertical rock shaft |9| carries a rearwardly projecting arm |90, upon the end of which there is rotatably mounted a cam following roller |95 disposed in engagement with a cam |96 formed on the peripheral face of a flange |91 associated with a stationary sleeve surrounding the dial supporting shaft. Sleeves |99, pinned to the upper ends of the rock shafts |9|, carry laterally projecting arms 200, which are connected totension springs 20|, the latter being in turn connected to a ring 202 mounted on the upper end of the dial shaft.

A raised platform 205 extends around the front of the machine beneath the infeed and outfeed dials and is provided with down-turned ends 205, 201, secured to the bed plate d0. The cams |98 are supported upon the platform 205, as shown in Figures 2 and 8, while the conveyor chain y20 (Fig. 18) moves in a channel member 203 thereon, beneath stationary article supporting plates 209, the latter being supported in spaced relation above the platform 205 by collars 2|0. A pivoted guide 2|| (Fig. 1) is adapted to yield outwardly to actuate a safety device to stop the machine in case of a jam. Stationary guide rails 2|2, 2|3

forming a part of'a unitary guide bracket 2 i4 are also provided.

It should be noted that the fixed arms i 98, |89

lof the outfeed dial each carry a pair of rearwardly projecting, adjustable screws 2l5 which are provided with sharply pointed ends, adapted to make only pin-point contact with the freshly coated containers. Similarly, the movable arms |93 are each provided with a sharply pointed, adjustable screw 2|9, to engage the opposite side of the cam.

The table enclosing hood assembly i Referring to Figures 19-23, the hood assembly 52 is carried by upwardly projecting, vertical rods 220, 22|, supported upon the main frame oi the machine. An upper flue member 222 has, at its upper end, an annular angle iron reinforcing member 224 to which laterauy pojeeting supporting bars 225, 226 are welded,` the bars being supported upon the upper ends of the rods 220, 22|. y The nue 222 may be open at its upper end, as indicated, or, if desired, 'it may be connected to an appropriate duct leading to the outside or yto a collector for the volatile solvents used in the varnish or lacquer spraying material.

The-hood assembly includes a lower table enclosing section 223,having anupper frsto-conical portion terminating at its upper end in an inwardly turned iiange 221 normally resting upon a packing ring 225', carried by an angular Bange 229 secured to the outer face of the nue 222, whereby a substantially air-tightseal is'provided between the ue and the lower section when the latter is in its normal, lowered position. At its lower margin, the frusto-conical portion of the hood merges into' a poition having a vertically disposed arcuate wall 230, having openings 23|,

232, 233 therein', through which the sprays from the exteriorly disposed spray guns may be projected, In the embodiment illustrated, each opening is substantially 57 in circumferential ex-l tent, but it must be understood that the openings may beclosed or reduced in length by appropriate closure members.- A

At the. juncture between thevertical and the frusto-conical portions, there is positionedan arcuate, angle iron reinforcing member 234, to

add strength to the assembly. A second arcuate reinforcing angle iron 239 is disposed adjacent its loweredge, the openings being closed by special entrance and exit lassemblies. y

' These assemblies comprise vertically disposed plates having arcuate inner portions 249 arranged concentric to the table axis, radial entrance or exit portions 259 and cuter angularly disposed outer end portions 25|the edges of the portions 4 249 and V25| being welded to the adjacent edges of the openings 241, 249. Horizontal, top closure plates 252 are welded to the upper edges of the vertical plates and to the upper margins of the openings 241, 248. Each radial plate portion 250 has an opening 4255 therein, substantially corresponding in outline to the container being treated, so that there is little or no chance that spray from the spray guns will be projected entirely across the table and outwardly through the small spaces between the containers and the margins of the openings,

The lower section 22s of the hood assembiy isy to raise the hood section 223 when it is desired to gain access to any of the'parts associated with the rotatable container-supporting table.'

Operation v 'I'he cam |96, associated with the infeed spider,

is so shaped that, as each pair of upper and lower stationary dial arms approach a container brought into the dial pocket by the infeed conveyor, the spring 20| of the associated movable arm swings the arm rearwardly with respect to the direction of rotation ofthe dial to clamp the container firmly between the fixed and movable -arms. The articles are thus iirmly held' against relative rotation in the dial pockets. The movements` of the dialand the table are so related that each pocket passes directly over an article thebottoms o! the openings 23l-233, while a Y third arcuate, angle iron 235 is welded to the i iower edge er the side wen m, with its horizontal flange extending inwardly and supporting a horizontal iloor strip 235, crryins at its inner edge a vertical flange 231, adapted to assume.

a sealing relation to the table, as shown in Figure 20.- Vertically disposed angle irons 23,9 or U- section channel members may be welded to the arcuate, angle irons 235, 239 and to the side wall adjacent the margins of the openings, toimpart the desired rigidity to the hood.v

Y the containers from the .stationary seats 12, theV The front tace of the hood-section 223 is ,dis-v.

posed upon a vertical plane, which is a chord of the frusta-conical and arcuate portions, thereby providing a vertical front wall 249 on the upper portion and a similar wall 24| 'on' the lower portion. The wall 24| delinea an enlarged opening 242, adapted to 'be closed by a iist closure plate 243 having apertures 244 therein which are received by hooks 245, for ready removal andreplacement. The closure plate' 243 has a rearzwardly projecting reinforcing angle strip 245 welded to its rear face adjacent its upper end, and is provided with openings 241. 249 adjacent receiving chuck on the table, in exact alignment therewith. At this instant, the cam 96, in engagement with the rollers 95, swings the movable arms |92 in the opposite direction, against the tension ofthe springs 29| to. release the/containers and position the samev accurately upon the seats 12 of the table chucks, the spindle heads 99 and magnetic rings 92 being at that time in their lowered position. As the chucks leave the infeed station, the cam following rollers |59 pass from under the cam |01, whereupon the springs 95 project the heads 99 upwardly to lift vcontainers being iirmly held upon the heads by the magnetized rings 92.l As the table continues itsv rotation,l the-chucks carry the containers through the entrance opening 255 into Athe interior of the hood sectionL 223. Immediately thereafter, the pulleys 92 successively come into contact with the driving belt ||2, whereby the spindles and the containers supported thereby are rapidly rotated. The containers are moved past the yspray guns 24, 25. at least one of which is in operation, as controlled by the central cam |35. The containers receive a uniform, even 'coating of varnish or lacquer and are carried around on the table, outwardly through the exit y chucks At this point, the containers are moved into the pocketspf the outfeed dial, substantially into contact with the pin-points 2|5. The cam |86,

associated with the outfeed dial, permits the movable arms to swing forwardly under the iniiuence of the springs 20| to closed position, so that the pin-points 2|6` carried thereby engage the cans and transfers them from the machine. The cans are gripped by these sharply pointed elements 2|5, ZIB and firmly held against rubbing or smearing until they reach the outfeed conveyor 21, whereupon the cam |96 moves the movable arms rearwardly to release the cans and to permit them to be carried away by the conveyor.

Although the invention has been described with considerable particularity by reference to the accompanying drawings, it must be understood that many changes in construction can be made and that the invention is not limited to the specific details shown and described, but covers all modifications coming within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.

We claim:

1. An article coating machine comprising a rotatable table, a plurality of rotatable, article holding chucks disposed circumferentially on the table, spray means supported in normally fixed position adjacent the path of movement of the chucks, means for continuously rotating the table, means for rotating the chucks about their axes as they move past the sprayingI means, and means for changing the eective, operative rotatable table, a plurality of rotatable article holding chucks arranged circumferentially on the table, two spray guns positioned adjacent the path of movement of the table and directed toward the path of movement of articles on the chucks, means for rotating the chucks and the articles as they are moved past the guns, and

. positioned adjacent the path of movement of the table and directed toward the path of movement of the articles supported on the chucks, means for rotating the chucks and the articles as they pass said guns, an air valve for controlling the operation of each gun and cam means rotating in timed relation to the rotation of the table for actuating said air valves to cause the guns to operate substantially alternately.

6. An article coating machine comprising a rotatable table, article transfer means adjacent the path of rotation of the table, a plurality of chucks arranged circumferentially on the table and journalled for rotation on axes `parallel to the table axis, a pulley on each chuck, a sheave rotatable about a xed axis adjacent the article transfer means and spaced outwardly from a circle drawn through the centers of the chuck pulleys, a belt trained about said sheave and about the chuck pulleys on the opposite side of Vthe table, whereby as the chucks approach said -sheave and the transfer means they move out position of said spraying means along said path.

2. An article coating machine comprising a. rotatable table, a plurality of rotatable, article holding chucks arranged circumferentially on the table and each comprising a receiving member iixed with respect to the table and another member carried by the'table for rotation with respect to the receiving member, means forvfeed-v ing articles to the chucks, means for discharging coated articles therefrom, means for rotating the table, spraying means positioned adjacent the path of movement of the articles and disposed to spray the surfaces thereof, means for rotating the second-mentioned members of the chucks and the articles about their axes as they move past the spraying means, and means for positioning the articles on the fixed receiving members of the chucks to arrest the rotation of the articles at the discharge position.

3. An article coating machine comprising a rotatable table, a plurality of article holding arrangedl circumferentially thereon, means for rotating the table, a plurality of rela.- tively stationary spray guns positioned adjacent the path of movement of the chucks, means for rotating the chucks as they move past the spraying guns, and automatic means operating in timed relation to the rotation of the table for periodically clearing and rendering inoperative each gun while another continues in operation.

4. An article coating machine comprising a of driven relation to the belt and reengage the belt after they depart from the transfer means and the sheave, and coating means positioned adjacent a portion of the movement of the chucks where the pulleys are in engagement with the belt.

'7. A coating machine comprising a plurality of article supporting chucks mounted for rotation about their own axes and for movement along a circular path; transfer means adjacent said path for delivering articles to and for removing articles vfrom said chucks, pulleys associated with the chucks for movement therewith, sheave means positioned adjacent the transfer means and spaced outwardly from the path of movement of the pulleys, a belt trained about said sheave means and the pulleys on the opposite side of the circular path of movement of the chucks from the sheave means and the transfer means, whereby said pulleys move out of contact with the belt as the chucks approach the transfer means and reengage the belt as the chucks move away from the same, means for driving the belt to rotate the pulleys andthe chucks when in contactftherewith, and spray means positioned to coat the articles while the latter are being rotated by the chucks.

8. A coating machine comprising a table mounted for rotation about a vertical axis, in feed and outfeed dials rotatably mounted adjacent thereto, a plurality .of vertical spindles arranged circumferentially in the table and journalled for rotation about their axes, article holding chucks and driving pulleys on the spindles, sheaves journalled for rotation coaxially with the infeed and outfeed dials, a belt trained about said pulleys and sheaves, means for rotating the table and the dials, means for rotating the tioned to coat the articles while the latter are f being rotated by the chucks.

9. A coating machine comprising a table mounted for rotation about a vertical axis, positively driven infeed and outfeed dials mounted upon rotatable shafts adjacentthe table, a plurality of vertical spindles arranged circumferen tially in the table and journalled for rotation about their axes, article holding chucks and pulleys on the spindles, sheaves journalled for rotation on the infeed and outfeed dial shafts, a belt trained about the pulleys and the sheaves, driving gears between the dial shafts and the sheaves for transmitting motion from the former to the latter at an increased speed todrive the belt and the pulleys, whereby, as the pulleys leave the infeed dial, they successively engage the belt andare rapidly rotated thereby and, as they ap'- proach the outfeed dial, 'they successively move out of contact with the belt, ,and spray means positioned to coat the articles while the latter are being rotated by the chucks.

10. A can coating machine comprising a rotatable table, infeed and outfeed dials adjacent thereto, a 'plurality of members fixed with respect to the table for supporting the lower ends of cansas theyl are successively placed thereon by the infeed dial, heads carried by the table and mounted Afor movement upwardly through the members to engage the bottoms of the cans and to lift the same above the members, means for so raising the heads, means for rotating the heads and the cans supported thereby when raised, means for coating the cans when so raised, and means for lowering the heads below the members to causethe cans to bel non-rotatably supported by the members.

11. A can coating machine comprising a rotatable table having a plurality of members xed with respect thereto for supporting the lower ends of cans, means for placing the cans on the members, magnetic heads carried by the table and mounted for movement upwardly through the members to engage the bottoms of the cans and lift the safe above the members, means for rotating the heads and the cans supported thereby when raised, and means for coating the cans when in the last-mentioned position. Y f l f 12. A can coating machine comprising a rotatable table having a plurality of circumferentially arranged'openings therein and depending brackets adjacent the openings, can supportingl spindles in. the openings mounted for rotation` about their axes and for axial movement relative to the table, shifting collars on the spindles having peripheral grooves therein, shifting forks pivotally mounted on thebrackets and engaging the collars, a stationary cam track, cam follow- .ing means operatively connected to said shifting forks, whereby,'upon rotation of the table,

the axial positions of the-spindles are controlled by said cam and the cam following means, to support the cans for rotation at predetermined times, andV means for coating the cans when so supported bysaid spindles.

13. A can coating machine comprising a rotatable table having a plurality of circumferentially arranged openings therein and depending brackets adjacent the openings, can supporting spindles in the openings mounted for rotation about their axes and for axial movement relative to the table, shifting collars on the spindles, shifting forks pivotally mounted on the brackets and engaging the collars, a stationary cam track,

and cam following means operatively connected to said shifting forks, whereby, upon rotation of the table, the axial positions of the spindleslare controlled by said cam vand the cam following means, pulleys on the spindles', a positively driven belt positioned to be engaged and disengaged by the pulleys during the rotation of the table to impart rotation to the spindles at pre- '15 determined times, and means for coating the cans while rotating with the spindles.

14. A can coating machine comprising a rotatable table having a plurality of circumferentially arranged openings therein and depending brackets adjacent the openings, cansupporting spindles in the openings mounted for rotation about their axes and for axial movement to and from can supporting relation, spring means for urging the spindles toward one limit of axial movement, shifting forks carried by the brackets and operatively engaging the spindles, cam means for moving the forks and the spindles toward -th'e opposite limit of axial movement. whereby the spindles are moved into and outor 3o can supporting relation, means for rotating the spindles when. in can supporting relation, and means for' coating the cans while rotating with the spindles'.

' 15. A can spraying machine comprising a rotatable table having a plurality of circumferentially arranged openings therein and surfaces concentric thereto for supporting the margins of thecan ends, sleeves carried by the table' for movement therewith andgjournalled for rotation 40 in the openings, spindles carried by the sleeves for rotation therewith and for axial movement relative thereto, can end engagingheads carried such as containersand the like, comprising a y rotatable-table adapted to receive and convey lthe articles along a circular path, a stationary justable mounting-means connecting .said guns toI vsaid arcuate support. whereby the positions of the guns may be changed circumferentially of said path. y

17. An apparatus. for spray-coating articles. such as containers and the like, comprising a rotatable table adaptedto receive and convey the articles along a circular path, an arcuate track extending along the path of movementof the articles, blocks movable along the track, clamping means for holding the blocks in different positions on the track,A for adjustment circumi'erentially of said 'pathg a supporting bracket carried'by each block, and s. spray gun mounted 75 on each bracket. l 1

16. 4An apparatus for spray-coating articles.

arcuate support adjacent the path of movement 4 of the articles, a plurality of spray guns and ad 18. An apparatus for spray--coating articles. such as containersand the like, comprising a rotatable table adapted to receive and convey the articles along a circular path, a pair o! spray guns adjacent the path of movement of the articles, a compressed air line leading to each gun, an air valve in each line controlling the operation of the associated gun, and a cam rotatable withsaid table for controlling the positions of said valves and the operation of the associated guns, said valves being positioned relative to said cam soas to be rendered operative 5 substantially alternately.

WILTIE I. GLADFELTER. CARL C. H. HAUGER.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification118/313, 118/326, 118/DIG.300, 118/319
International ClassificationB05B13/02
Cooperative ClassificationB05B13/0242, Y10S118/03
European ClassificationB05B13/02B3