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Publication numberUS2332511 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1943
Filing dateOct 5, 1940
Priority dateOct 5, 1940
Publication numberUS 2332511 A, US 2332511A, US-A-2332511, US2332511 A, US2332511A
InventorsBurger Clarence W, Falls Church East, Glassman Louis H
Original AssigneeDos T Hatfield, Edward Costigan, Robert B Swope
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Signature writing apparatus
US 2332511 A
Abstract  available in
Images(15)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Oct. 26, 1943. H, GLAssMAN ETAL 2,332,511 I SIGNATURE WRITING APPARATUS Oct. 26, 1943. L.. H. GLAssMAN ET AL SIGNATURE WRITING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 5, 1940 l5 Sheets-Sheet 14 il JMW Patented Oct. 26, 1943 SIGNATURE WRITING APPARATUS Louis H. Glassman, East Falls Church, and Clarence W. Burger, Arlington, Va., assignors to Edward-Costigan and Robert B. Swope, both 'of Washington,-D. C., and Dos T. Hatfield, Arlington, Va., trustees for the stockholders of Autopen Corporation Application October 5, 1940, Serial No. 359,980

.26 Claims.

This invention relates to the mechanical reproduction of line forms such as are produced with a scribing implement, and while comprehending the reproduction of miscellaneous types of line forms, is primarily concerned with handwriting, such as signatures, which must be reproduced with exceeding accuracy in order to preserve the individual characteristics of the writer.

One primary object of the invention is to provide a machine for producing permanent records of the movement of a scribing implement in forming or tracing signatures or other line forms from which reproductions can be made.

An equally important primary object of the invention is to provide a machine wherein the records are employed to control movement of a scribing implement in reproducing signatures or other line forms.

A further primary object of the invention is to provide a single machine which will perform the dual functions of making records of and reproducing signatures or other line forms.

The inventive apparatus includes a scribing element such as a pen which is freely movable under the normal guiding movement of the hand horizontally in all directions over a scribing plane and which can also be raised and moved from one part of the plane to another throughout scribing movement, as for example in dotting an 1, crossing a t and providing a space between the end of one word and the beginning of the next. A traveling record band is provided, preferably endless, together with a. pair of spaced record-engaging elements movable reciprocally in fixed paths at different transverse areas of the record bandcrosswise of the direction of travel thereof. Through carefully designed operating mechanism, scribing movement of the manually guided pen produces dual sinuous record tracks on the traveling band. 'I'he two record tracks, while representing the same movements of the pen and being more or less similar in shape, need not be identical and will not beidentical with the use of the preferred form of operating mechanism for translating movement of the pen into movement of the record-engaging elements, in view of the dierential in position of the paths of movement of the latter in relation to the area of movement of the pen.

It is essential, of course, particularly in the case of recording Writing, that the motion translating mechanism shall function easily and at usual writing speedsso as not to interfere with the free and natural movement of the hand in guiding the pen, as otherwise the writing and the recording Will-not represent the normal handwriting of the individual. It is equally important that the motion translating mechanism shal1 be extremely sensitive to the least movement of the pen in any direction in order that the recordingv may be entirely accurate and capable of reproducing the writing without distortion and in exact character. A particular object of the invention is to provide a motion translating mechanism satisfying these requisites. l

A record must be made to show the points when the pen is lifted from the scribing plane and again lowered. It is an object of the invention to provide automatic means controlled by the pen for this purpose and as hereinafter explained the same may take several forms. Such means is necessarily so designed as to work in conjunction with the translating mechanism since the pair of record-engaging elements must be moved to new positions during the periods when the pen, after being lifted, is shifted and again lowered to the scribing plane in a new position.

To facilitate recording, it is found desirable to incorporate various additional4 features in the machine. Provision is made of means coordinated in operation with the travel of the record band to indicate when the scribing movement of the pen should be commenced so that the recording will begin at a predetermined point on .the band, and when the scribing movement should be finished so that the recording of the complete writing will extend over a selected length of band In one of its several forms, such means may' function to show the proper writing speed for any speed of travel of the band so that the writing may be timed to suit the purpose just mentioned, and so as to insure that the record tracks will take the form of relatively gradual sinuous lines which are better calculated to insure accurate reproduction than sharp curves. Provision is further made of means for varying the speed of travel of the record band to coordinate the same with the varying writing speeds of different persons, so that writings at varying speeds and/or varying lengths may be recorded over a given length of band.

The provision of the dual record tracks on the record band serves to provide an accurate control of a pen through which the latter may be moved horizontally in all directions lengthwise, transversely and diagonally, each record track serving to guide the pen in all such movement in cooperation with the other track. The fact that the two record tracks are each of a form to produce the same movement of the reproducing pen makes greater accuracy oireproduction, and is of particular help in this respect where, as is possible with the inventive machine, reproduction is carried out at higher operating speeds than the original writing speed.

For reproducing operation, the same translating mechanism is employed as in recording, in this case, however, being actuated by recordengaging elements under control of the record band and serving to operate the pen for reproducing the recorded writing. By utilizing an endless record-band, a Writing such as a signature may be reproduced thousands of times within the space of an hour. Suitable automatically controlled means is provided to raise and lower the pen at the proper times, working in cooperation with the translating mechanism so that the reproduction is automatic in every respect.

To facilitate reproducing operation, various additional features'of the invention may be lncorporated in the machine which enable high speed operation. Means may be provided to hold the paper during reproduction of the writing thereon and then to automatically release the same when the operation is completed.' Cooperating with such means may be automatic paper ejecting means which will discharge the paper from the operating area of the pen after a writmoved upon the completion of the operation.-

The feed means is desirably of such character that the writing may be adjustably positioned at any selected location of the paper sheets, this feature being particularly important in order that letters of varying length, checks, etc., may have a signature scribed thereon by the machine in correct position. The feed means must operate in synchronism with the speed of travel oi the record band and provision is made for varying the speed, of the band and feed means so that reproduction may be effected at any selected speed.

The foregoing and further objects and features oi theinvention will become apparent from the following detailed description and the appended illustrative drawings. In such drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of our invention;

Figure 2 is an enlarged detailed plan view showing a modified form of raising the reproducing scriber during reproduction of writings;

Figure 3 is an enlarged'detailed plan View of a portion o the modified form of raising the reproducing scriber during reproduction of writings as shown in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is an enlarged side elevation of a portion of the modied form of raising the reproducing scriber during reproduction of `Writings as shown in Figure 2 with parts broken away; Figure 5 is an enlarged section taken on line 5--5 of Figure 2;

Figure 6 is an end elevation of the mechanism shown in Fgure-1 Figure 7 is a side elevation of the structure shown in Figure 1;

, mechanism being shown in dotted lines;

Figure 12 is a sectional View of Figure 11;

Figure 13 is a detailed plan view of a modiiied form of actuating means for raising the reproducing scriber during reproduction of a writing;

Figure 14 is a detailed plan View of a modified form of recording the lifting movement of a stylus during the recording of a writing;

Figure 15 is a sectional view of Figure 13, showing a modiiied form of actuating means for raising the reproducing scriber;

Figure 16. is a sectional view of Figure 14 of a modified form of recording the lifting movement of a stylus during the recording of a writing on the record band; Figure 17 is a detailed end view of Figure 8 showing a form of actuating means for raising the reproducing scriber during reproduction of a writing;

Figure 18 is a sectional view of Figure 17 showing a modified form of actuating means for raising the reproducing scriber;

Figure 19 is a detailed sectional view of the actuating lugs shown in Figure 18;

Figure 20 is a sectional view of actuating means for the paper clamp; a Figure 21 is a sectional view of a modied form of our invention of actuating means for raising and lowering the reproducing scriber and the paper clamp;

Figure 22 is a detailed end view partly in section of Figure `21;

Figure 23'is a detailed end view partly in section of Figure 21; f

Figure 24 is a detailed side elevation showing the mechanism for removing paper, and showing parts of a modified form oi.' mechanism for raising and lowering the reproducing scriber and paper clamp, other parts of the latter being broken away;

Figure 25 is a detailed top plan view of the structure shown in Figure 24;

Figure 26 is a detailed side view of a modiiied form of our invention for raising and lowering the reproducing scriber and the paper clamp;

Figure 27 is a detailed plan view of a portion of the structure shown in Figure 26;

Figure 28 is a detailed side view of a portion of the structure shown in Figure 26, showing another portion of the structure;

Figure 29 is a detailed side view-of a portion of the structure shown in Figure 26, showing still another position of said structure;

Figure 30 is a detailed side sectional view of the writing plate;

Figure 31 is a detailed end sectional view oi the writing plate;

Figure 32 is a detailed plan view of a portion of the mechanism for feeding paper to the reproducing scriber;

Figure 33 is a detailed side view of the actuating cam and wheel for actuating the paper feeding and ejecting mechanism;

Figure 34 is a detailed side view of the mechanism for feeding paper to and ejecting paper from the reproducing scriber;

Figure 35 is a detailed fragmentary view of a portion of the paper feeding mechanism;

Figure 36 is a detailed end view of the paper feeding and ejectng mechanism;

Figure 37 is a detailed side View of the driving mechanism for the paper'feeding and ejecting structure;

Figure 38 is a detailed side view of the paper feeding and ejecting mechanism;

Figure 39 is a detailed side View of a portion oi the paper feeding and ejecting mechanism;

Figure 40 is a diagrammatic View of the wiring for portions of the electric system.

Referring now to the drawings, reference numeral I generally indicates the cabinet, which may be of any suitable construction. The scriber, or pen, is indicated at 2, and is connected to a link arm 4 having a curved extension 3. The only purpose of the curve in said extension is to enable the operator to View his writing at the time of recording the signature. The link arm 4 is pivotally connected to pivot arm 1 by means oi a pivotal connection 5, which connection is of the ball joint type so as to provide universal movement. Link arm 6 is pivotally connected to pivotv arm 9 by means of pivotal connection 8, the same being identical with pivotal connection 5. It will be noted that arm 4, pivotal connection and pivot arm 1 are identical in structure to link arm 6, pivotal connection 8 and pivot arm 9, the only distinction beingthe curved extension portion 3 of link arm 4. Link arm 8 is pivotally connected to link arm 4 by means of pivot stud I0.

The scriber 2 is mounted in an aperture formed in the curved extension 3 of link arm 4, and is secured therein by means of holding nuts I2.

Link arms 1 and 8 are supported by and swing about stationary pivot studs I3 and I4 respectively. Marking pens |8 and I1 are inserted throughfhubs |82 and |63, which hubs are located at the ends of arms 1 'and 8 and are supported by said arms to move in fixed paths.

When the scriber 2 is moved in any horizontal direction, the marking pens I6 and I1 will move in ilxed paths across a moving record band 50,

' and as the marking pens I6 and I1 are in contact with said recordband, lines 5| and 52 will be drawn on the band. These lines represent the recorded movement of the scriber 2. Because of the delicacy of writing movement, the mechanism which transmits the movement of the scriber 2 to the marking pens I6 and I1 must be positive in its nature, and, also, must be light and freely movable, so that there will be only the slightest amount of drag on the scriber 2. Otherwise, a. person recording his signature would not have normal freedom of movement with the scriber 2, and the writing could not,

therefore, be natural.

The ball or universal joi-nts 5 and 8 are provided to enable the scriber 2 to 'be lifted out of the horizontal plane, and not interfere with the marking pens I6 and I1. This lifting movement, of course, is made when the scriber 2 is raised to dot an 1" or cross a t, or upon the completionpf one word to begin another word.

For the purpose of recording the raising or vertical movements of the scriber 2 on the record band 50, We have provided a writing plate 2U (see particularly Figures and 31), which iits into recesses formed in the frame I. A bracket 2|, secured to the underside of the frame I, ex-

tends downwardly and carries therewith a thumb screw 22, which screw is threaded through locking nuts. A tension spring 23 has one end thereof secured to the thumb screw 22 and has its opposite end thereof secured to a connecting angle 24, the angle in turn being connected to the underside of plate 20. Micro-switches 25, one being located on each end of the underside of the writing plate 20, are secured to the bracket 2| by means of a nut and bolt assembly 26, the bolt in turn being inserted through a slotted aperture 21. These micro-switches 25 have buttons 28 extending upwardly into contact on the underside of writing plate 20. The tension of the tension spring 23 is so adjusted as to be almost equal to the upward force of the buttons 28 of the micro-switches 25, although it will be understood that the buttons exert a slightly greater upward force than the tension spring 23. When Writing, the point of the scriber 2 will exert a slightly downward pressure on writing plate 2D, which pressure, even although slight, will be suiiiciengt to overcome the slight upward differential pres sure exerted by the buttons 28. Thus, when the point of the scriber 2 is in contact with the writing plate 20, the .buttons 28 will be forced downwardly so as to operatethe micro-switches 25. These micro-switches are adapted to complete a circuit to a solenoid 3|, which is mounted at the top of the table in any suitable manner. The solenoid 3| has a plunger 32 operating therein. A yoke 33 is secured to the plunger 32 by means of a cap 34, the end of the yoke having caps 35 mounted thereon to form rigid connections with rocker arms 38 and 31. These rocker arms are supported on fulcrums 38 and 39, andare pivoted thereto by means of pivot pins 40. Rocker arms 38 and 31 have rounded ends somewhat in the form of balls 4| and 42. The marking pens I6 and I1 extend upwardly through the hubs |62 and |63 of arms 1 and 9, the upwardly extending portions being barrels 45 and 46 of the marking pens I6 and I1. These barrels 45 and 46 have shoulders 41 and 48. Coil compression springs 43 and 44 encircle the barrels and seat upon the top portions of hubs |62 and |63, and bear against the shoulders 41 and 48, to thus constantly urge the marking pens I6 and I1 upwardly. Thus, when the scriber 2 is raised to dot an i, cross a t, or for any other purpose, the scriber does not exert pressure on the writing plate 20. Therefore, the buttons 28 will move upwardly thus breaking the Contact through the microswitches 25, and hence the solenoid 3|. When the circuit is broken to the solenoid 3| the plunger 32 will drop, thus permitting rocker arms 36 and 31 to rock about their fulcrums 38 and 39, thereby permitting the springs 43 and 44 to raise the marking pens I5 and I1 out of contact with the record band 50. As the record band is moving by means which will presently be described, a space will occur on the record band wherein no .lines will be drawn, thus indicating that the scriber 2 has been raised from the horizontal writing plane.

A modified mechanism for recording the lifting of the scriber for any purpose whatsoever is shown in Figures 14 and 16. In this form a solenoid |00 is mountedron frame I, and has a plunger |0| operating therein. A marking pen |02 is secured in any suitable manner to the plunger |0|. The solenoid |00 is mounted on a plate |03. the plate being secured to the top of the cabinet -I by means of thumb screws |04. This mechanism would do away with the solenoid 3|, yoke member 33 end rocker arms 36 and 31, etc., and the marking pens |6 and II would be in contact with the tape 50 at all times. The operation of this form of device for recording the lifting of the pen is as follows: When the point of the scriber 2 is placed on the writing plate 20, the micro-switches complete a circuit to solenoid |00 so as to retract the plunger il, thus lifting the marking pen |02 from the band. Assuming that the pen is lifted from the writing' plate to dot an i or cross a t or the like, the 'circuit would be broken to solenoid |00, thus allowing the plunger |0| to be forced downwardly by means of a coil spring or the like, which operation in turn would lower the marking pen |02 into contact with the band 16. As the band will be revolving at a constant speed, a straight line will be marked on the band for the duration of the time that the scriber 2 is not on the writing plate 20. This line will indicate the length of time that the scriber 2 has been lifted, and thus permit operation of one of the many ways, which will presently be described, for lifting the scriber 2 from the writing plate when the machine is reproducing the recorded signature.

A record band 50, which may be formed of vinylite or other suitable composition, moves underneath the marking pens I6 and IT, so that the pens may draw lines thereon. The record band 50 is rigidly supported throughout on the periphery of wheel 53. This will prevent vibration of the record band during movement, and, of course, Vibration must be excluded if the machine is to operate `with minute accuracy. The wheel 53 is rotatably mounted on shaft 54, the Wheel 53 having a suitable hub 55 and shaft bearings 56 and 51. The bearings are mounted on the frame generally indicated at in any suitable rnanner. l

An electric motor B0 is supported on the bottom portion of the framework and is provided with 'the usual pulley 6|, driving belt 82, the driving belt in turn being adapted to drive pulley 63. Pulley 63 is also rotatively mounted on shaft 54, although the same is free of the shaft. A clutch member 64 is keyed or otherwise fixed to shaft 54. If the pin 65 is pulled outwardly as shown in Figure 6, the pulley 53 will revolve freely about the shaft 54. However, when the pin 65 is pushed inwardly, it will lock the clutch member 64 with pulley 63 so that upon rotation of the pulley 63, the shaft 54 will be rotated through the medium of the clutch.

A modified form of supporting the record band is shown in Figures 8 and 10, Where, instead of providing a single wheel for the record band a sprocket wheel 'I0 is adapted to drive the record band 'I6 by means of the perforations 15 therein. This sprocket Wheel 'l0 is rotatably supported on shaft 1|, the shaft in turn being supported by hanger blocks 'l2 and 13, the hanger blocks in turn being supported in any suitable manner .on the frame l. The record band 1B will have suitable take-up and idle rollers mounted in the lower portion of the framework (not shown). In this modification the driving means for the sprocket wheel l0 is similar to that shown for the wheel 53. (See particularlg7 Figure 8.)

A ,timing device shown in Figures 11 and 12 is arranged to cast a shadow upon the writing plate 20, so that the person Whose signature is to be recorded may practice writing his signature so as to write the same within a certain length of time. Also, this timing device will function to indicate when the scribing movement of the pen should be begun, so that the recording will begin at a predetermined point on the band, and when the scribing movement should be finished so that the recording of the complete writing will extend over a selected length of band. Also, the particular feature about to be described will. function to show the proper writing speed for the scriber 2 for any speed of travel of the record band, so that the writing may be timed to suit the purpose just mentioned, as well as to insure that the record tracks will take the form of relatively gradual sinuous lines. This device, as shown, consists of a bulb |40 mounted in a rehector box |4|, the same being secured to the underside of the writing table so as to illuminate the writing plate 20, which may be formed of ground glass or the like. A disc |43 has a plu-1 rality of fiat fingers |42 projecting radially therefrom, said fingers being adapted to be positioned between the bulb |40 and writing plate 20, so as to cast a shadow visible through the writing plate. The disc |43 is provided with a suitable hub memoer |44, and is secured to shaft |45 by means of set screw |46. A gear |41 is keyed o1.' otherwise secured to shaft |45, said gear meshing with worm gear |48. Worm gear |48 is fixed to shaft |49, which shaft is geared either to shaft 54, as shown in Figure 7, or to shaft 7|, as shown in Figure 8, depending upon which modification is employed for the support and rotation of the record band. The gear ratio between disc |43 and wheel 53 (as shown in Figure 7), or wheel 'l0 (as shown in Figure 8), 'is such as to turn the disc |43 one-fourth of a revolution for a complete revolution of either wheel 53 or record band 16. Thus it will be seen that upon one complete turn of the record band a :linger |42 will appear underneath the writing plate 20 ad jacent to the lefthand side thereof, and slowly pass underneath the writing plate 20 until the same reaches the righthand portion of the writing plate, during whichrtime the person writing his signature must complete the same. The length of time required to move the linger |42 from the extreme righthand portion of the writing plate to the position shown in dotted lines in .Figure i. is that time necessarily required, ln reproducing the signature, to move the scriberl 2 from the righthand portion of the. writing plate upon the completion of a signature. to the lefthand portion of the writing plate so that the same will be in position to reproduce another signature.

An alternative method of timing the writing of the original signature which is to he recorded is shown in Figures 1 and 7. Referring particularly to Figure 7, a bar |20 is pivotally connected to a fulcrum |2| which is attached to the frame i in any suitable manner. A cam |22 is fixed to the shaft 54, and rotates therewith. A roller or ball |23 is inserted in the bar |20 at the point where the cam |22 will hit the bar |20. Upon one complete revolution of the shaft 54, which would also mean one complete revolution of the wheel 53 and the record band 50, the cam |22 will be forced downwardly, at which time the bar |20 will operate a momentary single impulse switch |24, said switch completing the circuit to light |25 (see Figure l), which light is mounted on top 0f the framework Thus, the person writing his signature may practice the timing thereof, so that he may complete the same upon one complete revolution of the record band 50, which complete revolution will be signaled to him by the flashing of light |25, as just explained.

In order to vary the speed of travel of the `record duringrecrding', so as :to coordinate the same withyar'ying writing speeds oftdifferent :and/or of'varying lengths may be recorded over a givenlengthof band, we-have provided a Vrheostat (seepFigureAOii `which will controlthe speed ofthe Vmotori() so ,as to regulate thespeed of jthe rotation of `the',record band'. The 'person-who is writinghis signature may 'control the speed of the record-band,cby means of the yrheostat to lenable hi'm't'o Write his signature-or other wrLting within thel same length of time that it takes the record,- band` to` make approximately fourfifths off one revolution, the remaining one-fifth 'revolution being required to return the scriber the outset that the electrical diagramis for representative purposes only, and that numerous other types of electrical systems can be employed.

Referringto electrical diagram, Figure 40, the

; operator closes thefoot switch, thereby completing a circuit through motor markedUA. The

blank band then begins to revolveat a speed which may beregulatedf through-speed control rheostat marked B.

- A circuit -C, is so. connected byy means selector s witch D (which is close'd to post marked set) which causes alight marked E to flash at every revolution/'of the record band.

C .through the mechanism indicated by' F,

:the marking pens I6 and I1 downwardly counteracting the pressure 4of the coilspririgs-AS Iand 44. Thus, upon the start of the signature, the `marking pens IB and I1 will be forced downwardly so as to contact the revolving record band 5l).-v Asv the operator moves the scriber 2 in writ- .ing the signature, the link arms 4 andv 6, and

.-,pivotarms 1 and 9 will impart an arcuate motion to the marking pens, and as the record band Iis revolving thereunderthe marking pens impart wavy'lines 5| and 52 on'the record band, thus veach line 5l and 52 records the two components of movement. The arcuate motions ofthe marking pens l6 and`l1 are graphic means of recordingthe' motion of the operator-actuated scriber `2. Any point on the writingv plate 20 may be located by thepositions of the ends of the arms .1 1 andVS through simple geometric transference.

If the scriber 2 is held at any pointon plate 20, the marking pens I6 and I1 Will assume a definite position, on the record band -501with respect Lto any baseline 'of this record band, such as, for

example, itsv center line.' If the scriberl 2 is now v-moved an infinitesimal distance in 'any direction, the marking pens will move correspondingly in their arcuate motion to record individually two "separate points which in turn refer-this second This flashing is caused by completion of circuit i a mechanical-switch' which closeswith every revolution-'of the record bandxzn this manner,

the person.A who-is recording his signaturecarr He does l,this by v turning 'selector switch D to the postmarked wrtef thus partially completing circuit .G which is fully ccmpleted only when pressure is'pl'aced upon" the writing plate,

thereby closing' thecompleted circuit through 'a' micro-switch'attached thereto. The completion lector switch makes it possible to practice writing for synchronization of` speeds, and then when thislis accomplished, to effect v`a circuit `which willmaket'a recording when the operator is ready.

yIn the description .of the mechanical drawings,

we will assume `that the person Whose signature is to be recorded has timedhimselflso that he can synchronize the writing of his' ,signature scriber 2,will bef. placed -on.the,writing:plate 'positio'n ofthe scriber 2. Aline being a series of points innitesimally "willithus, give a series of distant from each other infinitesimal spaced points at the marking pens 'I6 and I1. Further, a

' `line being a continuity of points, the points obtained on `the record band are therefore continuousf-thus giving aline under each'of the pens I8 andjv I1. These two lines thus obtained are a ,graphic recording ofthe motions of the scriber 2. Any two instantaneous points of these two lines 5 I5 and 52 reflect a deniteinstantaneous y position of the scriber 2.

As soon as the writer lifts the scriberw'Z-frcm the writing plate. 2ll.to'dot an i or cross a t,

' for upon the l'completion of one word -or name,

their fulcrums sure exerted on `band 50. revolve, there will not vbe any lines on the record band While thepens lB-and l1 (also scriber 2) are lifted. Upon the crossing of the t" or the .T v. Eff-the circuit tothe `solenoid 3l is broken through .When bellas4 thus achieved g gyn.. the medium of micro-switches under the writing he'is then, ready to actually record his 'signaturef i' plate 20.: Whenfthe circuit is broken -to the solet will drop downwardly, thus 'forcingtherocker arms 36 and 31 to` rock about 38 and 39, thus relieving the presthe collars 41 and 4B of the marking pens I6 and l1.` The' compression of the springs 4 3 and will thus force `As therecord bandV will continue to dottlng of an i the .scriber 2 will again contact the' writing plate,` thus through the microswitches rof the writing plate, make the circuit to the solenoid 3|, which, through the operation Y previously described, will'againforce the marking pens I6 and i1 into contact with the record withjthe `speed of vthe record band. the starting of his. signature, the pen Apoint 'o f, the

' band 50'.

It will understood Ythat the operation above describedwill take placewhether the support for the record band is in. the form of a single wheellf53, as-shown in; Figures 1, 6 and 7, or

whether the same isin `the form of the sprocket wheel 10, .as shown in Figures 8; and v10. Also,

-it will' understoodfthat thefmodified form v4recording the lifting of the pen, as shown in Figures 14, land, 16., previouslydescribed, may be Assuming no w that the master or original sigthe marking' fehlerfrem"'Gwwm energizeuie scribmgpen if Pens upwardly 'out Off Contact with the record solenoid andwill"thereby causethe scribing Apens or themarking pencil, previouslyqnotemto drop upon the recordband causing a mark, whichisfth'e v actual vv record ofthe signature il'hus, these-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2642659 *Aug 23, 1948Jun 23, 1953Paul Black LeonAutomatic facsimile writing and drawing machine
US2649033 *Aug 26, 1950Aug 18, 1953Metal Arts CompanyDie cutting machine
US2676869 *Dec 15, 1949Apr 27, 1954Cons Electric CompanyStylus mechanism
US2692301 *Dec 15, 1949Oct 19, 1954Cons Electric CompanyStylus mechanism and system
US3104930 *Nov 14, 1960Sep 24, 1963Victor Comptometer CorpGraphic communication recording device
US3203001 *Oct 23, 1961Aug 24, 1965Telautograph CorpPen drive for telescribing apparatus
US3261098 *Aug 23, 1963Jul 19, 1966Jr Worth N TwistDrafting device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification33/18.2, 346/139.00R, 266/63, 266/61, 346/29
International ClassificationB41J2/49
Cooperative ClassificationB41J2/49
European ClassificationB41J2/49