Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2332826 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1943
Filing dateJan 29, 1942
Priority dateJun 10, 1940
Publication numberUS 2332826 A, US 2332826A, US-A-2332826, US2332826 A, US2332826A
InventorsFryer Louis S, Jokilehto Wayne J
Original AssigneeInd Rayon Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of fabricating flexible spools
US 2332826 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

OcL26, 1943. L s. FRYER ETAL METHOD OF FABRICATING FLEXIBLE SPOOLS Original Filed June 10. 1940 Summer: Louls SFRYER \AAYNE \LJOKILEHTO FIG. 3

attorney vent free shrinkage.

umrso s'rA'rEs PATENT. OFFICE METHOD OF FABRICATING FLEXIBLE SPOOLS Louis S. Fryer and Wayne J. Jokileh'to, Cleveland,

Ohio, assignors to Industrial Rayon Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Original application June 10, 1940', Serial No. 339,666. Divided and this application January 29, 1942, Serial No. 428,730 r This application, which is a division of application Serial No. 339,666, filed June 10, 1940, relates to a method of manufacturing a new type of flexible winding spool adapted for employment in the production, handling and treating of threadlike articles.

,-Although the spool with which the invention deals. is adapted for use in the manufacture,

- handling, or storage of anytype of thread, it is especially applicable to use in the production of multiple filament viscose artificial silk thread. In the course of its manufacture by the so-called spool-spinning system, such thread is customarily wound upon a rigid, perforate spool upon which .it is successively subjected to a series of wet treatments, afterwhich it is dried. During the liquid-treating and drying operations, a rigid spool, even if perforated, tends to impede the thorough application of the processing fluids to the thread. It may also be responsible for the introduction of a variety of discrepancies into the physical and physico-chemical characteristics of the thread. I

Such discrepancies are for the most part trace- I able to the drying operation, in which, by reason of the use of a rigid spool, the thread shrinks unevenly. In a typical case,. the layers of the thread package lying nearest the spool are entirely prevented from shrinking. The intermediate layers are .caused to shrink in different degrees since to a certain extent they are cushioned by other layers'as they are dried. The outermost layers, which dry first, are for themost part not free to shrink when they are dried. As might be expected, the resulting irregularities manifest themselves in various ways and render the product much less useful for certain purposes; such, for example, as in the'weaving of cloth.

Obviously, if such processes could be adapted to produce a uniformly shrunk thread without the necessity of repackaging, their utility would be greatly increased; accordingly, the desideratum is a winding spool which is sufliciently rigid to retain its shape, yet flexible enough not to interfere unduly with the shrinkage of the thread.

Many types of flexible winding spools have been developed with a view to eliminating the rigid 6 Claims. (Cl. 113-116) not displaced the conventional-rigid spool, this in 4 spite of the latters numerous disadvantages.

The present application contemplatesa method of fabricating a novel type of spool which 18 compressible radially when subjected to uniform pressure, yet sufflciently rigid to withstand rough treatment. In the accompanying drawing, Figure 1 is an isometric projectionof a flexible corrugated spool which embodies the novel features of the present invention. Figure 2 represents a transverse section of the spool shown in Figure 1 obtained by passing a plane perpendicular to the axis of said spool at a point intermediate the ends thereof. Figure 3 is a vertical sectional elevation of the spool as seen from line 3-4 of Figure 2.

.The spool is made from a comparatively thin gauge sheet metal in which have been formed a plurality of substantially parallel grooves 5 and ridges 6. The number and depth of corrugations to be employed will depend upon the diameter of the finished spool, as well as upon the intended use thereof; for example, if a highly flexible spool is desired, it is advantageous to form therein a smaller number of grooves and ridges, but of greater depth. on the other hand, if too many or-too deep grooves are present, especially where the normal diameter of the finished spool is small,

interference between the grooves may unduly limit the radial compressibility of the spool.

At both. ends of each groove 5 and ridge 6 are provided stiffening means which, for the sake of convenience, are shown as taking the form of bevels 8 and 9. They serve, among other things,

to strengthen the corrugations so that the spool as a whole readily resists lateral warping during use. Bevels 8 and .9 further operate to facilitate the insertion of the spool in the processing appasurface which, in actual practice, operates to pre- Spools have been constructed of narrow sheet metal strips, of wire fabricated to provide a series of axially extending loops, in the form of so-called gapped cylinders made of springy metal and the like, but operations with such spools have not proven successful. Among'other things, such flexible spools have ratus. 'All sharp edges or burrs which tend to damage or even break the thread as it is unwound from the spool are thus removed. In addition, the possibility of injury to the operator resulting from contact with the edges of such spools is eliminated. In forming the sheet metal to give rise to a generally tubular member, the edges of the material extending parallel to the direction of said grooves 5 and ridges Bare joined in any convenient manner, as by a soldered, folded or welded butt or lapped connection. 'A folded joint, such. for example, as that indicated in Figures 1 and 2 by reference character .1, is preferable inasmuch I approximately :the

as it does not unduly affect the static and dynamic balance of the spool. The location at any one point upon the periphery of the spool of excess metal which results from the employment of certain types of joints produces harmful effects, especially when the filled spool is rotated at high speed, as in the operation of unwinding the thread therefrom.

Most materials after having been shaped mechanically assume a slightly different shape when subjected to ordinary use for a short period of time. After this change which the material unsheet aluminum, etc.

to size the spool may be reduced as much as possible.

in the fabrication of the spool of the present invention; for example, stainless steel, sheet iron, Obviously, the material employed must possess a certain degree of springiness and yet should maintain its shape under all sorts of conditions. It must resist not only fatigue but also the corrosive action of reagents employed in the processing of thread.

dergoes, the article as a whole assumes a con- 'stant shape; that is, it takes a permanent set.

By virtue of this fact, certain allowances must necessarily be made in the course of manufacalloys possess virtually all of the more desirable characteristics, such as workability, lightness, and flexibility without early fatigue, besides being somewhat more resistant to corrosion than most other-materials, they are especially adapted to use in the present invention.- However, deformation of this kind is particularly marked in wrought aluminum alloys, which must therefore be given especial attention.

In practice, it is desirable to employ a spool which has a constant 4 /2 inch outside diameter. In a typical case, therefore,the spool is formed mechanically to an outside diameter of 5 inches from a wrought aluminum alloy sheet material of .OIO-inch thickness (Brown 8: Sharp gauge) specified according to the handbook of the Aluminum Company of America as alloy 52S-% H. This material has a composition of 2.5% chromium and 97.25% aluminum and normal impurities, and a Brinell hardness factor of "74 (500 .kg., 10 m. m. ball).

Metal rings having an inside diameter of 3% inches are applied to'either end of the 5-inch The latter factor is of very great importance in the manufacture of artificial silk thread ac.- cording to a wet process, for instance, the viscose process.

-Mat'eria1s which are readily attacked by corrosive liquids when employed in spin spools may, however, be treated to prevent decomposition and weakening of the spool structure. Paints and various types of plastic coatings such as .hard rubber, .Bakelite, Heresite and the like which possess a certain amount of elasticity and resistance to chipping or cracking have been found to retard the corrosive action of the coagulating bath upon the/spools. Accordingly, such a coating, while often not strictly necessary, may usually be employed to' advantage.

Modifications in the method or the character of the article may readily be made without departting in any way from the spirit of the present invention. Under certain'circumstances, it may be found to be advantageous to combine the op-v eration of setting the spool with that of heat: treating or tempering the material. Moreover, the spool may be formed with fiat edges extending longitudinally of the ridges in place of curved surfaces for the purpose of providing greater surface contact for the thread turns. Many other substances than those already indicated such,

of 45 hours to a constant temperature in excess of 130 F., preferably approximately 150 F.

After cooling or quenching, the rings are resumed permanent set.

Other wrought aluminum alloys have been found to display properties similar to those of the alloy referred to in the foregoing example, fvarying principallyzin the degree of shrinka e which results from the setting operation. Such alloys are,'for example, those designated. in the handbook of the Aluminum Gompany of America as 51S-T, 53S-T'and BIS-T, all of which have same composition as IRS-FY4111. -It will be understood that with such xflalloys" the temperature employed in the setting greater or less than that above dvantageously as high as prachat the period of time required for example, as Micarta, Bakelite and other synthetic plastics may be employed in the fabrication of the spool.

The structure of the spool per se is not being claimed in this application but represents the subject matter of the parent application Serial No. 339,666 to which reference has previously been made herein.

It is intended that the patent shall cover, by suitable expression in the appended claims, what ever features of patentable novelty reside in the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. The method of fabricating a flexible corrugated spin spool characterized by its ability to be radially compressed and to resume its normal shape in spite of innumerable fiexings comprising the steps of forming. a plurality of parallel corrugations in a flexible sheet material, joining the edges of said sheet material extending substantially parallel to said corrugations so as to fashion a generally tubular member having a diameter larger than the normal diameter desired for the finished spool, compressing said tubular member to a predetermined minimum diameter which issmaller than the desired normal diameter of the 'finished spool, while ,maintaining said tubular member in compression,

subjecting it to heat treatment to set'the tubular A wide variety of other materials may be used smaller than the desired normal diameter of the finished spool, while maintaining said tubular member in compression, subjecting it toheat treatment to set the tubular member, removing the compression from the tubular member so that it will expand to the above-mentioned esired normal diameter, and cooling the tub armember.

3. The method of fabricating a flexible corrugated spin spool characterized by its ability to be radially compressed and to resume its normal shape in spite of innumerable flexings comprising the steps of forming in a flexible sheet material a plurality of parallel corrugations,- joining the edges of said sheet material extending substantially parallelto said corrugations so as to fashion a generally tubular member having a diameter larger than the normal diameter desired for the finished spool, compressing said tubular member to a predetermined minimum diameter which is smaller than the desired normal diameter of the finished spool, while maintaining said tubular member in compression, subjecting it to heat treatment to set the tubular member, quenching the tubular member, and thereafter removing the compression from said tubular member so that it will expand to the above-mentioned desired normal diameter. 1 4. In the fabrication of a flexible spool froma generally tubular member the periphery of .which is characterized by a plurality of parallel corrugations and has a diameter larger than the normal diameter desired for the completed spool,

the method of treating said tubular member to render it upon completion capable of resuming its normal diameter in spite of innumerable flexings comprising the steps of compressing said tubular member to a diameter smaller than the desired normal diameter oi the completed spool,

while maintaining said tubular member in com- 'pression, subjecting it to heat treatment to set the tubular member, cooling the tubular memher, and thereafter removing the compression from said tubular member so that it will expand to the above-mentioned desired normal diameter.

5. The method of fabricating a flexible corrugated spin spool characterized by its ability to be radially compressed and to resume its normal shape in spite of innumerable flexings comprising the steps of forming a plurality of parallel corrugations in a sheet metal blank, Joining the edges of said blank extending substantially parallel to the corrugations so as to fashion a generally tubular member having a diameter larger than the normal diameter desired for the finished spool, compressing said tubular member to a predetermined minimum diameter which is smaller than the desired normal diameter of the finished spool, while maintaining said tubular member in. compression subjecting it to heat treatment to set the tubular 'member, cooling the tubular member and thereafter removing the compression therefrom so that it will expand to the above-mentioned normal diameter.

6. The method of fabricating a flexible corrugated spin spool characterized by its ability to be radially compressed and to resume its normal shape in spite of innumerable flexings comprising the steps of forming a plurality of parallel corrugations in a sheet metal blank, chamfering the ends of said corrugations, joining the edges of said blank extending substantially parallel to the corrugations so as to fashion agenerally tubular member having a diameter larger than the normal diameter desired for the finished spool,

compressing said tubular member to a predeter-' mined minimum diameter which is smaller than the desired normal diameter of the finished spool, while maintaining said tubular member in compression subjecting it to heat treatment at a temperature in excess of F. to temper the tubular member, cooling the tubular member and thereafter removing the compression therefrom so that it will expand to the above-mentioned normal diameter.

LOUIS S. FRYER.

WAYNE J; JQKILEEI'Q.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2451703 *May 2, 1945Oct 19, 1948Weiss Paul AlfredResilient tantalum tubes and a process for making same
US2527983 *Apr 26, 1947Oct 31, 1950Robertshaw Fulton Controls CoMethod of forming beryllium copper snap rings
US2641830 *Nov 2, 1948Jun 16, 1953Chicago Pump CoMethod of making corrugated tubes
US2666723 *Dec 19, 1951Jan 19, 1954Associated Spring CorpMethod of manufacturing helical coil compression springs
US3648345 *Jan 15, 1970Mar 14, 1972Zenner Walter JMethod of manufacturing lightweight-type wheels
US4662884 *Apr 25, 1984May 5, 1987University Of Utah Research FoundationProstheses and methods for promoting nerve regeneration
US4778467 *Jul 10, 1986Oct 18, 1988The University Of UtahProstheses and methods for promoting nerve regeneration and for inhibiting the formation of neuromas
Classifications
U.S. Classification148/516, 148/695, 148/530, 148/535, 148/592, 148/593, 148/521, 148/524
International ClassificationB21D15/02, B21D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2701/5114, B21D15/02
European ClassificationB21D15/02