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Publication numberUS2334826 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1943
Filing dateOct 4, 1940
Priority dateOct 4, 1940
Publication numberUS 2334826 A, US 2334826A, US-A-2334826, US2334826 A, US2334826A
InventorsLowe Ernest A
Original AssigneeLowe Ernest A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire extinguishing apparatus
US 2334826 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. A. LOWE FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 4, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Nav. 23, 1943.

Nov. 23, 1943. E, A, LOWE y FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS Filed oct. 1940 4 sheets-sheet 2 6 MM2 R/MWH man.. Mm my o M A L al Vl B w D U w M Nov. 23, 1943. E, A LOWE 2,334,826

FIRE EXT INGUISHING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 4, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 @Madd/M? ATTORNEY5l NGV.. 23, 1943. E. A, LOWE FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Oct. 4, 1940 INVENTOR 'f//es/owe /o'd/mwfr ATToRNEYg Patented Nov. 23, 1,943

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,334,826 FIRE EXTINGUISHING APPARATUS Ernest A. Lowe, Fanwood, N. J.

Application October 4, 1940, Serial No. 359,750

23 Claims.

The present invention has been made after many years of careful study of the art of iire controlling and extinguishing systems and apparatus and has for its principal object the combining in one system and for universal use a simplified and inexpensive system utilizing a combination of such improved parts and features which have, from years of tests and use, proven to be the best ones available to secure the results aimed at. a In constructing and assembling the apparatus of the invention I preferably not only employ standard parts and pipes and fittings of the combined systems at presenton the market and easily obtainable but I eliminate to a great extent the many adverse limitations now prevalent in each such separate standard system. y

A further object of the present invention is the production of a fire detecting and extinguishing system of a simple combination of parts and complete in all details, the same system being suitable `for use in either heated or unheated properties, and without change of the type of system, thus obviating the need of two different types, with its attendant commercial Waste.

Another object of the invention is the production of a system of the above character described having improved dependability and method of detection of iires by the employment of two separate and distinct types of re detecting devices on the system, each able to operate independently of the other and with one more sensitive to the action of heat than the other, thus in realityI giving in the one system two different methods of iire detection and system operation, with one more expeditious of operation than the other and with both recognized as standard Vand each independent of the other for emergency action.

At the present time, because of necessity and of varying or different conditions, two separate and distinct types of fire extinguishing systems are employed to Wit: those known as the dry pipe and the wet pipe systems. Each type, however, has many limitations and the specific requirements of the purchaser anduser must be carefully weighed before the installation of any specific type is employed. It has been attempted heretofore to combine in modified form both systems in one installation but such attempts have been an expensive `procedure as the various apparatus, control features and method of operation are distinctly different in each of the systems and are not interchangeable or the same system usable in both heated or unheated properties or those properties which have unheated sections. 'I'he combining of the systems, furthermore, has made necessary the provision of a multiplicity of separate and auxiliary devices and parts resulting in a complicated, expensive and unwieldy structure susceptible to disarrangement and break-downs and, in many cases, to premature operation resulting in loss by property damage. Some of these modified systems are at present in use but are unsatisfactory for various reasons and have failedvto present the real solution to the'problem.

By means of the present system, whichI designate a Universal system, I have provided a single type of system at no increase in cost which may be used in all occupancies, whether the premises are heated or unheated, instead of two diilerent and distinct types which have been used for many years. The invention also permits ot the ready renovation of either of the present types of systems without the necessity of any drastic changes therein or expensive additions thereto as the present Universal system does not require the installation of any separate or special auxiliary system. v

Theoretically, as respects speed of operation, a wet pipe system is preferable. It, however, has disadvantages which a. dry pipe system does not possess and vice versa. A wet pipe system, as the name implies, is one in which the system piping including the main riser and the distributing pipes on one or more floors of a building, and which are usually positioned adjacent the ceilings, are always filled with the extinguishing iiuid.

'as water, so that it is available for immediate discharge and distribution by the sprinkler heads when they open under the iniiuence of heat, as from the heat of a iire. This results in increased speed of operation and is the primary reason Why wet pipe systems are preferred over dry pipe systems. In unheated buildings, however, such for, instance, as in aeroplane hangars, or other buildings where heat is not required or desired, the use of a wet pipe system is not practicable for the reason that in cold weather the water in the pipes is susceptible to freezing thus making the apparatus inoperative and in addition making for liability to damage of property by water due to broken pipes. This system requires special types of control valves and other various parts not necessary and in fact unsuited for use in dry pipe systems.

On the other hand, the standard dry pipe systems, which may be used in unheated properties, are those in which the main riser and distributing pipes are normally not lled with the extinguishing fluid but, in most instances. with closed position and which also prevents the admission of the extinguishing fluid to the system until the actual occurrence of a fire. Thus, be-l fore the system is able to function, the normally closed sprinkler head or heads must flrst fuse to open them and enable the piping to be freed of its compressedair, and thereby permit, the main valve to open by pressure of the extinguishing medium, whereby the extinguishing medium will iow to the opened sprinkler head or heads for discharge therefrom. -These steps consume valuable time in which much damage, can be done by a re, especially a fast-moving re which might occur in a building in which' highly inflammable materials are stored. In cases of this character, any loss of time before a re is attacked, even seconds, can wellresult very seriously. The dry pipe systems alsorequire special types of control valvesand other various parts not necessary and in fact unsuited for use in Wet pipe systems. Accordingly, it has heretofore not been possible to ,combine the apparatus, or some of it, of both systems into one simple and quick-operating system embodying the desirable features of each of them and having additional improved features to produce a more dependable system which shall be operable under all conditions.

In the present invention I have combined the best features of both systems just discussed and have associated therewith certain meritorious features not heretofore employed in either system. Furthermore, I have obtained by the use of the invention a number of advantages as heretofore mentioned and others which lwill be referred to briefly before making a detailed description of the apparatus and parts thereof and of the invention. Inasmuch as they are distinct advantages and advances in the art, they may be considered as objects of the invention.

In the present; invention, although I employ the use of compressed air in the system as in present standard dry pipe systems, the pressure required in this particular case is but from 11/2 to 2 lbs. per square inch maximum in contradistinction to presentl standard systems in which a pressure of approximately 45 lbs. per square inch is necessary. This comes about by reason of the fact that in present standard dry systems relatively high air pressure is necessary to hold the automatic main control valve closed against the fluctuations in the pressure of the extinguishing fluid from the source of supply which fluid pressure automatically opens the main valve to admit the extinguishing fluid to the system when the pressure of the compressed air therein has been relieved. In the present instance the compressed air does not, per se, hold the main control valve closed by direct pressure thereagainst but it does, nevertheless, affect certain instrumentalities which in turn aiect the opening and closing of the main valve.

Because of the manner of operation ,of the main control valve in the present case, I eliminate the detrimental effects of water surges which occur periodically in systems in which water is supplied under pressure, for instance, from a city water main. These Vwater surges heretofore have resulted in the improper functlonlng of dry pipe systems in thatl they have caused certain parts of the system to operate prematurely, thus filling the pipes. with water,

causing 'possible damage by freezing and water damage and the giving of a fire signal, thereby necessitating time-consuming adjustments of parts, the resettin'g of some of them and repairs or replacements if the system freezes. It has been attempted to eliminate 'the giving of an alarm by such surges in certain cases by providing what are known as alarm retard devices to retard the operation of certain parts when such periodic surges occur. The inclusion of such devices, of necessity, introduces limitations in the system and increases its cost of installation and are not necessary in the present construction. In the instant case the opening and closing of the main control valve is effected by the pressure of the extinguishing fluid thereagainst or against a supplemental' movable part connected to the main valve, even though that pressure may vary, and the presence of water surges does not adversely aiect the position of the main valve or the instantaneous functioning of the system and its parts in proper sequence and at the proper time.

In furtherance of the general objects of the invention and in particular I provide a relief device for relieving the system from the pressure of compressed air therein to promptly condition the system with extingulshing'fluid upon the occurrence of a fire whereupon the system will operate more quickly from the effect of an incipient fire, separate actuating means independent of the aforesaid relief device for detecting fires and for also relieving the system of the pressure of compressed air, novel means for automatically actuating the main control valve upon a variation in the amount of such air pressure, means for automatically boosting or in- I creasing the air pressure when it has fallen below a predetermined amount, the giving of a signal in that event and the automatic stopping of such boosting means and signal when the amount of the desired air pressure in the system again has been attained. I further provide for the giving of a signal should there be a failure of the main supply of extinguishing fluid under pressure, or an appreciable drop in the amount of its pressure, the giving of a local as Well as a general signal immediately upon the occurrence of a tire and in adv-ance of the operation of the sprinkler head or heads, the giving of a signal should the main shut-off .or gate valve controlling the flow of extinguishing fluid to the system be turned towards closing position either by design or from inadvertence and a visual indicator to indicate whether the main automatic control valve is in open or closed position.

In -addition to the foregoing I have further provided a system of the general character above described which shall be responsive for its operation` upon two well-known principles, that of the rate-of-rise of temperature or that on the attainment of a predetermined degree of tem'- perature. 1 therefore increase the re lighting qualities of the system to an appreciable degree.

A brief summary of many of the advantages of the invention are now catalogued possibly at the expense of some repetition but to emphasize the importance of the invention and are as follows:

A. The Universal system detects fire by the most efficacious method known, that of the rateof-rise principle. This also is supplemented by a separate method, known as the fixed temperature principle, thereby utilizing two separate methods of fire detecting in the one system each operating independently of the other.

B. A re alarm signal is given in advance of first-aid crew, when possible. to extinguish the fire before the sprinkler head opens and operates. thereby eliminating water damage which is now reported to 'be some 80% of the total damage from all fires.

C. The main automatic control valve is pro.

vided with a self-indicating feature showing at all times'whether the valve is open or closed.

D. The system is not susceptible to the objectionable effects of water supply surges thereby obviating the giving of false alarms so prevalent in both present wet and dry systems.

The system gives a local fire signal at the location of the fire in addition to a signal general for all purposes.

F. Full automatic supervision features are inherent in the system and a warning alarm vis sounded if trouble occurs. This relieves an attendant of much of his personal attention and vigilance heretofore found necessary and accordingly lowers the cost of maintenance.

G. The system may be purchased and installed at no greater cost to the public than the present wet and dry pipe systems.

H. The system employs accepted standard types of sprinkler apparatus, pipes and fittings that may be readily and cheaply obtained from a number of 'manufacturers of sprinkler systems and these various parts may be readily combined to produce the invention embodying one system for universal use in any and all properties instead of the two types, wet and dry above, referred to.

I. In the present system all pipes ar empty and hence are not susceptible to freezing and one universal type of system only is provided suitable for both heated and unheated properties.

J. As the system is not susceptible to freezing, water damages and loss of protection from freezeups are eliminated.

K. Automatic notification is instantly given should the water supply to the system be either cut off or so reduced in pressure as to be inoperative.

L. Instant notification is given if the main hand control valve is tampered with, as for instance. an attempt to close the same.

M. The system employs extremely low air pressure (1l/2 to 2 lbs. per sq. inch) which is maintained as an automatic supervising medium for determining breaks in thepiping or any loss in the operating requirements, a signal being given upon any derangement thereof.

Further objects and advantages of the improved system embodying the invention will become apparent from the sub-joined description thereof, the invention consisting in the novel parts and combinations thereof hereinafter more particularly described and then specified in the claims.

In the accompanying-drawings illustrating a typical and preferred embodiment of the invention:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a portion of a general lay-out illustrating most of. but not all. of

taining a constant pressure of air in the 4system and the automatic air pressure switch.

Fig. 4 is an elevation of a portionof the system showing one of the rate-of-rise air relief valves and one of the sprinkler heads.

Fig. 5 is a section taken through one of the rate-of-rise air relief valves, and

Fig. 6 is an elevation of an indicator adapted for attachment to the automatic main controll lconventional manually controlled gate valve I4 cuit and energizing bell 23.

the elements making up the combination of the y for controlling the flow of Water from its source to the riser II is indicated at I4 and it is provided with a shank I5 threading through a wall of a supporting cylindrical housing I6, said shank connecting with said gate valve I4 to open or close it by manipulation of the operating wheel I4. The shank I5 is grooved, as at I1. The groove receives the end of a rod I8 extending through an opening in a wall of the housing I6 and which slidably supports the rod. The upper end of the rod I8 is pivoted, as shown, to a contact lever I9 which in turn is pivoted to an extension 20 on a wall of supporting housing I6. A tension spring 2| secured to said lever I9 and to a lug 22 on said wall normally urges the end of the rod I8 into engagement with the groove I1 and when in this position the gate valve is open thus permitting the extinguishing fluid to flow into the riser II.

When the gate valve is closed, of course, the system becomes inoperative for fire control and extinguishing purposes because of the failure of the flow of the extinguishing iuid thereto. To guard against a situation of this character, either from design or inadvertence, I have provided for the sounding of an alarm in the form of a bell 23 which connects by conductor 24 to gate valve trouble relay, indicated generally at 25, andby conductor 26, through battery 21 to said relay., The relay in turn is connected by conductor 28 through transformer 29 to contact 30 and by conductor 3I to extension 2U on supporting housing I 6. Thus, when the wheel I4 is manipulated to close the gate valve the end of rod I8 ridesout of groove I1 on shank I5 and onto the outer peripheral surface of said shank to force the end of lever I9 to move upwardly and engage contact 30 thereby closing the cir- When the wheel I4 is again rotated in the proper direction to open the gate valve, the end of rod I8 engages within groove I1 and releases lever I9 from engagement with contact 30 to break the circuit and deenergize bell 23.

The main automatic control valve housing which is incorporated within the riser II is indicated at 32. Within it the water or other extinguishing uid chambers 33 and 34 respectively are provided separated by a wall 35 apertured, as at 33, and providing a seat for the main valve 31 all as more clearly shown in Fig. 2. To condition or fill the system, the extinguishing fluid flows or is forced upwardly through the gate valve,

through riser II, into chamber 33, through aperture or opening 36, into chamber 34, thence into the upper portion of riser II and to and through the distributing pipes I2. `The valve 31 is provided with a valve stem 38 extending rearwardly through a stuffing box 39 and into a cylindrical closed housing 40 in which a piston head 4I constituting a valve actuator may be slidably reciprocated and to which the inner end of the valve stem 38 is connected. The piston head separates the housing 40 into two liquid chambers to wit: 42 and-43 respectively neither of which communicates directly with the fluid chamber 33. As illustrated, chamber 42 is provided with a coiled compression spring 44 which, by its action, acts to retain the valve 31 on its seat to close the valve opening 36 against the passage of liquid therethrough. Inasmuch as the piston head 4I and the main control valve 31 are rigidly connected together by the valve stem 38 and neither is Inovable independently of the other, together they constitute a single element for all practical puroses. p A four-way valve is indicated at 45. If so desired it may be secured to the housing 40 in any desirable manner. Mounted within the valve on a central shaft 46 is a rotatable valve member 41 provided with extinguishing uid passageways 48 and 49 respectively. Normally, that is, when the main valve 31 is closed and in seated position to close the passageway 36, one end of fluid passageway 48 registers with the upper end of drain pipe 50 which extends within the wall of valve 45 while the other end registers with a pipe 5 I, one end of which extends within the wall of valve 45 while the other end communicates with liquid chamber 43 of cylindrical housing 40. When the parts are in this position, as more fully shown in full linesin Fig. 2, one end of fluid passageway 49 registers with the end of a pipe 52 which extends through the wall of valve 45, its other end communicating with liquid chamber 42 of housing 40, While the other end of .passageway 49 registers with an end of pipe 53 extending through the valve 45, its lower end being connected to the lower part of the riser II beneath the gate valve previously described.

The lower end of a weighted lever 54 is secured to shaft 46 to rotate therewith. The upper end of said lever 54 is normally hooked in upper and retracted position by latch 55 of an arm 56 pivoted to an extension 51 of an air chamber' 58 a wall of which comprises a flexible diaphragm 58 to which the inner end of arm 56 is fastened in any desirable manner. A pipe 59 connects air chamber 58 with the riser II at a point remote from the location of main control valve 31.

Mounted on suitable spaced connections 60 on the branch or distributing pipes I2 are closed fusible sprinkler heads indicated generally at 6I, the

construction of which is very old in the art and requires no detailed description. Suffice it to say they `are provided with elements which fuse under the influence of heat of a predetermined degree, as that occasioned by a fire, to open the heads, condition the system with the extinguishing fluid and permit discharge of the extinguishing fluid from the system for fire controlling and extinguishing purposes.

I prefer to have the system lled with compressed air as hereinbefore referred to-for pur- -poses to be hereinafter described but the pressure of that compressed air for the purpose for which it is provided need only be .small and approximately from 11/f lbs. to 2 lbs. per square inch.

Obviously, however, the compressed air must be expelled from the system in a predetermined amount before the extinguishing uid can enter it to be discharged from the sprinkler heads for lire controlling and extinguishing purposes. To expel the air, I first provide a quick-acting relief valve acting on the rate-of-rise of temperature principle and depending for its action on'v the rate of change of temperature rather than on the attainment of a fixed degree of temperature sufcient, for instance, to fuse and thus open the sprinkler heads. Accordingly, when a re occurs, the sudden rise in temperature occasioned thereby automatically actuates the relief valve to permit the escape of compressed air from the system and to actuate the other parts and open the main valve whereby water or other extinguishing fluid will condition or ll the system ready for immediate discharge from the sprinkler heads when they fuse and open. Should the relief valve, for any reason, operate imperfectly, or fail to operate at all, the compressed air will escape from the system and the same results will be accomplished upon the fusing and opening of the sprinkler head or heads, as will be manifest.

A relief valve of the character just referred to and which might be employed is indicated at 62 (Figs. 4 and 5) and is shown and described in the patent to W. B. Griffith, No. 1,909,490, dated May 16, 1933; The relief valve per se is preferably connected to one or more of the pipes 60 for the fusible sprinkler heads 6I by a pipe 63 whereby it is under the influence of the compressed air in the system.

As described in the aforesaid patent, a pressure chamber 64 is provided as well as a chamber 65 communicating with the pressure chamber but which is separated from chamber 64 by a flexible diaphragm 66 supported in any desirable manner as by plate 61. An exhaust port is indicated at 68 and is normally closed by a valve 69 which is connected to a pivoted lever 10 the inner end of which engages beneath a collar 1I secured upon a tube 12. Said tube is loosely supported by a guide post 13 and the tube extends through the plate 61 and is fastened to the diaphragm 66. A coiled spring 14 encircles the lower part of tube 12 and supports its weight and the weight of the associated parts.

The upper end of tube 12 is lprovided with a plug or head 15 extending within chamber 65 and having a passageway 16 therein restricted in size at its upper end. This provides an equalizing vent for equalizing the air; pressure in pressure chamber 64 and chamber 65. A perforated shield 16 surmounts the upper end of plug 15 if so desired. A pipe connection 11 is provided between chamber 65 and a coil or tube 18 constituting the rate-of-rise element which is formed of relatively thin metal having a large surface area'exposed to the outer atmosphere. Upon a sudden rise in temperature, as from the heat generated by a lire, the air in element 18 quickly and appreciably expands and its pressure flexes diaphragm 66 downwardly against the action of spring 14 thereby exerting pressure against the inner end of pivoted lever 10 by collar 1I to rock the lever on its pivot and 'disengage valve 69 from its seat. This opens exhaust port 68 and permits the escape of compressed air from the system through the port after which valve 69 automatically closes to close said port in an obvious manner.

While I have shown and described a construction of relief valve operable on the rate-of-rise principle and adapted upon functioning to permit lthe riser and beneath the gate valve.

the escape of compressed airfrom the system whereby the system may be conditioned or filled with the extinguishing fluid .prior to the fusing of a sprinkler head or heads, it will be noted that the valve so shown and described is normally under the influence of the compressed air inthe system piping. Examples of such valves will be found in my prior Patents Nos. 2,187,906, dated January 23, 1940, and 2,213,528, dated September 3, 1940. A fusing and opening of the sprin kler head or heads-will accomplish the same result, however, as in the previous case.

I! the supply of Water from the main should fail, or if its pressure should be insuillcient for fire controlling and extinguishing purposes, it is desirable that an attendant or others should immediately be apprised of those facts. Accordingly, I have provided a signal for that purpose. Referring to Fig. 3, 19 indicates a pressure chamber connected by pipe 80 to the lower portion of The upper wall of chamber 19 may constitute a flexible diaphragm 8| to which a lever 82 is attached and which is pivoted to an extension on a wall of the chamber 19. An electrical contact 83 may be carried by the opposite side of the chamber and the pressure of the water flowing through pipe 80 flexes the diaphragm upwardly against the action of a spring 84 and prevents the engagement of the end of the lever with the contact 83. The contact is connected by. conductor 485 with a transformer 86 which in turn is connected with the coil of a relay by conductor 81, said relay being designated generally as 88. Said coil is also connected by conductor 89 with lever 82.

A bell or other desired signal is indicated at 80. It is electrically connected by conductors 8| and 82 with the proper parts of relay 88, conductor 82 being interconnected with battery 83. When there is no water pressure in pipe 80 or when the pressure therein falls appreciably, diaphragm 8| retracts and the action of spring 84 draws the end of lever 82 into engagement with contact 83. This closes the circuit and energizes signal 80 which continues to sound an alarm until the pressure in pipe 80 has been restored to again expand diaphragm 8| and release lever 82 from its engagement with contact 83 in an obvious manner. y

For the proper functioning of the apparatus it is necessary that its piping system, at least so much of it as is positioned above the main control valve 31, be lled with compressed air when the system is not operating, although the pressure thereof need only be relatively small and perhaps but from 11/2 lbs. to 2 lbs. per square inch as hereinbefore explained. Nevertheless, this constant pressure must be maintained. To compensate for possible loss in pressure because of leaks, etc., I 'have provided an automatic air compressor and automatic air pressure switch and regulator in the syste/m, the construction of Which will not be explained. This air compressor operates instantaneously upon a drop of air pressure in the system to prevent any premature opening of the .main automatic control valve in the manner Arelief valve hereinbeiore v.explained be actuated and opened or should a sprinkler head fuse and 'is indicated at los.

open to .permit the system to become conditioned with the extinguishing iiuid and to permit the system to function upon the opening oi' a sprinkler head.

Referring particularly to Fig. 3, the body of the air compressor pump is indicated at 93 and is provided with crank arm 84 mounted on shaft 95, the crank arm being connected by means of connecting rod 85' to a piston head 86 reciprocable in cylinder 81. The head of the cylinder is provided with a spring-controlled'airgoutlet poppet valve 88 and a' spring-controlled air inlet valve 88. The air compressor pump is driven by a motor here shown conventionally and indicated at |00, the belt connection between the pump and motor being designated as IIII.` A compressed air outlet pipe is shown at |02 and communicates with the air outlet poppet valve 88. Obviously. on the down-stroke of the piston head 86, air is drawn into the cylinder 81 by suction while on its up-stroke the air so drawn in is compressed and forced through th'e poppet valve 98 into pipe |02. The pipe is provided with two branches |03 and |04 (respectively, the first of which connects with riser II, while the second connects with the upper chamber I 05 of an automatic air pressure switch and regulator, the lower chamber of which The chambers are separated by a flexible diaphragm I 01 to which a rod |08 is attached. Said rod slidably extends through the lower wall of chamber |08 and is pivotally connected to a bar |08, one end of which is pivoted to an extension IIO of the lower wall of chamber |06, while the other end carries a contact I II in the form of a set-screw.

A relay is indicated generally at I I2. Conductors I I3 and I I4 are connected to the proper parts of said relay and also to motor |00 and a source of current supply |I5 respectively. A conductor IIS also connects' the motor and the source of current supply. The bar |08 is also electrically connected by conductor I I1 with a transformer I I8 which is in turn connected to the coil of relay II2. A still further conductor II8 connects said coil and a contact |20 which lies adjacent contact III. A tension spring I2| is provided and is fastened to the bar |08 and lower wall of chamber |08. Its action tends to force the rod |08 upwardly and in consequence the diaphragm |01 in the same direction against the pressure of the compressed air.

When the piping `of the system is filled with compressed air of the required amount, pressure is exerted thereby against the upper side of diaphragm |01 and holds the bar |08 in the position shown and against the action of spring I2I with the contacts III and |20 out of engagement with each other. When the pressure falls below the required predetermined amount, however, which can be adjusted by the position of contact setscrew III, the spring I 2| acts through bar I 09 and rod |08 to press the diaphragm |01 upwardly against whatever r pressure remains in chamber |05 thereby bringing contacts .III and |20 into engagement to energize the relay II2 and start the motor |00. The air compressor is then brought into operation in the manner heretofore explained. When the pressure has again reached the degree required, it again forces the diaphragm downwardly, against the action of springl tirely automatic and they will repeat themselves l whenever and as often as is necessary.

e ingly, this has been provided for in the present f system. Referring particularly to Fig. 2, a fluid pressure chamber is indicated at |22 and its upper wall preferably comprises a flexible diaphragm |23 fastened to the chamber in any desired manner. Said chamber is connected by pipe |24 to chamber 34. A bar |25 is fastened to diaphragm |23 and an end thereof is pivoted to an extension |25 on a wall of chamber |22. On the opposite side a contact i 21 is mounted.

Contact |21 is electrically connected to a transformer |28 which in turn is connected by conductor |29 to electromagnet |30. 'I'he electromagnet is connected by conductor |3| to bar |25.

A clock is indicated at |32 and is adapted, when' |32 to give the desired interrupted code signals vby intermittently breaking the contact between contacts |35 and |33 when the clock is in operation. Contact |33 is also connected by conductor |31 to aA battery |38 which in turn is connected to a local signal which, in this case, is in the form of a bell |39. Conductor |40 electrically connects bell |39 and register |33 together. To hold the clock |32 against rotation, I provide a pivoted lever |4| having a hooked end |42 normally engaging within a notch in the clock and held in this position by the action of a spring |43. When -the main control valve 31 is unseated, the extinguishing fluid flows through opening 38 into chamber 34 and then by way of pipe |24 into fluid pressure chamber |22 where it exerts pressure, upwardly directed. against diaphragm |23 thereby causing bar |25 `to engage contact |21 to close the electrical circuit and energize electromagnet |30. This rocks lever |4| on its pivot in a counterclockwlse direction and against the action of spring |43 to release the hooked end |42 from its engagement with the notch in clock |32 which rotates the clock and brings register |33 and alarm |39 into operation.,

When flre breaks out the relief valve previously described is almost immediately affected by the sudden rate-of-rise of temperature occasioned thereby and in advance of the fusing and opening of a sprinkler head. 'I'his results in the release of the compressed air in the system in the manner previously described and faster than it can be restored by the air compressor thereby relieving the diaphragm ,58' oi' the air pressure which had been present in air chamber 58. Should the lrelief valve fail to function properly, or to function at all, the same result is accomplished by the fusing and opening of a sprinkler head.

The release of pressure on the diaphragm 58' causes it to move or be deflected or contracted inwardly thereby swinging the arm 56 on its pivot and disengaging the latch or hook 55 from the end of weighted lever 54. Lever 54 then falls by gravity in the direction of the arrow (Fig. 2) to rotate the valve member 41 with it. The ends 43 or to chamber 42.

of valve passageway 40 will then be brought into register with pipes 5| and 53 respectively and the ends of valve passageway 49 into register with pipes 52 and 50, as shown in dotted lines. Obviously, therefore, the water under pressure from the source of supply will then flow through pipe 53, passageway 48 and pipe 5| into chamber 43 and any water in chamber 42 will flow or be forced through pipe 52, passageway 49 and to and through the drain pipe 50. 'I'he reversal of pressure to the opposite side of piston head 4.| forces it rearwardly against the action of spring 44 to unseat the main control valve 31 and force the extinguishing fluid through the opening 36 and up and through the riser and distributing pipe to thoroughly condition the system and send an alarm and permit of the immediate discharge of the extinguishing fluid from the sprinkler heads as soon as they fuse and open,

From the above explanation, it will be understood that the position of the valve member 41 determines the position of the main control valve, that is, whether it is in open gor closed position. Said valve member 41, manifestly, controls the flow of the extinguishing fluid either to chamber When the extinguishing fluid flows into chamber 42, pressure is exerted against the back of the piston head 4| to hold the main control valve in closed position, or that position shown in Fig, 2. When however, -the valve vmember 41 is swung to open position or in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 2, flow of the extinguishing medium to chamber 42 is cut-off and is diverted to chamber 43 and it exerts pressure against the reverse face of piston head 4| to force the main control valve into open position as will be apparent.

Although the main control valve is at, all times subjected tothe pressure of extinguishing fluid flowing from the source of supply, this fact does not prevent the opening of the main control valve when the flow of the fluid is diverted to the opposite side of the piston head 4I and into chamber 43 because of the pressure differential between the piston head 4| and main control valve 31.

brought about by the greatly increased surface area of the former over the latter.

To determine by mere visual inspection whether the main control valve is in open or closed position I have provided a convenient indicator illustrated in Fig. 6. When this indicator is employed, the valve 45 and associated parts are positioned further to the left or more remote from the cylindrical housing 40 than as shown in Fig. 2. In said Fig. 6 the reference numeral |44 indicates a rod which is fastened to the piston head 4| and which extends through the rear wall of the housing 40.A 'I'he casing |45 bearing the legends "closed and open" is supported by bracket member |46 and a pair of lamps |41 is housed within said casing behind said legends. The electrical circuits for said lamps |41 are so arranged that when the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 6, the lamp behind the'legend closed will be energized and when the rod |44 engages with a contact member |48, because of the movement of the main control valve to open position, the lamp behind the word open will air under pressure other than atmospheric pressure, a main control valve for controlling the supply of extinguishing fluid to the riser and dis- .tributing pipes and operable to closed or open position by the pressure of said extinguishing fluid and held in closed position by such pressure, normallyclosed fusible sprinkler heads mounted on said distributing pipes, an air relief device connected to one of said sprinkler heads and automatically operable upon an abnormal rate of rise in temperature to permit equalization of the pressure of air in the system with that of the atmosphere and to thereby condition the system with extinguishing uid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, an air pressure-responsive device connected to the system and responsive to a variation of air pressure therein and means connecting said pressure-responsive device and the main control valve for reversing the direction of the pressure of the extinguishing uid against the main control valve to automatically open the same and operable upon actuation of said air pressure-responsive device.

2. In afire controlling and extinguishing system, a source' of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the inuence of air under pressure in excess of atmospheric pressure, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads adapted for opening under the inuence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve adapted to control the admission of said uid to the system, means carried by said system for automatically permitting the escape of excess air pressure from said pipes upon an abnormal rate-ofrise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing iiuid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, air pressure-responsive means connected to the system and operable upon a variation in the amount of pressure therein, a supplemental control element connected to said main control valve and under pressure of the extinguishing Iiuid for normally holding the main control Valve in closed position and valve means connecting said pressure-responsive means and supplemental control element and automatically operable upon actuation of said escapement means to reverse the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluidl against the supplemental element and thereby force the main control valve into open position.

3. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing uid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the influence of air under pressure in excess of atmospheric pressure, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted on the distributing pipes and adapted for opening under the influence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve influence of air under pressure in excess yofatmospheric pressure, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted on the distributing'pipes and adapted for opening under the influence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve adapted to control the admission of said fluid to the system, means carried by said system for readapted to control the admission of said fluid to l the system, means carried by saidsystem for reument connected to said main control valve and having opposed sides each of greater surface area than either side of said main control valve with one of the sides of said supplemental element normally underv full pressure of the extinguishing iiuid while the other side is free from pressure for lieving said pipes from excess air pressure upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature to thereby condition the system with extinguishing iiuid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, air pressure-responsive means connected to the distributing pipes and operable upon a variation of air pressure in said pipes, a supplemental control element comprising a closed cylinder, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder, a valve stem connecting said piston and main control valve together, one side of said piston normally being under the pressure of the extinguishing iiuid while the other side is free from pressure to hold .the main control valve in closed position and means connecting said pressure-responsive means and automatically -operable on actuation of said pressureV relieving means to divert the pressure of the extinguishing fluid from its normal direction against the said one side of said piston to the opposite side while relieving said one side from any pressure to thereby force the main control valve into open position.

5. In a re controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing uid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the iniiuence of air under pressure in excess of atmospheric pressure, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted on the distributing pipes and adapted for opening under the influence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve adapted to control the admission of said uid to the system, means carried by said system for relieving said pipes from excess air pressure upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temper- .ature, pressure-responsive means connected to the distributing pipes and operable upon a loss in the amount of air pressure in said pipes, a. supplemental control valve element comprising a cylinder, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder to provide two liquid chambers and a valve stern connecting said piston and main control valve together, a rotatable valve member, a pipe connection between the source of extinguishing uid and said rotatable valve member, a pipe connection between one of said liquid chambers and said rotatable valve member, a drain pipe also connected to said rotatable valve member permitting a construction whereby the extinguishing `fluid will flow from the source of supply into said one of said liquid chambers to exert pressure against said piston and retain the main control valve in closed position and to permit the extinguishing uid in said second liquid chamber to ow to and through said drain pipe, and means connected to said pressure-responsive means and automat- -ically operable on actuation of said pressurerelieving means to move said rotatable valve member to a position whereby the extinguishing fluid will flow through said rotatable valve member and to the other of said liquid chambers to open said main control valve whereby the liquid in said rst of said chambers will flow through said rotatable valve member and to and through said drain Pipe.

6. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a' source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality ci.' distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the influence of air under pressure, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted on the distributing pipes and adapted for opening under the influence of a predetermineddegree of heat, a main control valve adapted to control the admission of said fluid to the system, means carried by said system for relieving said pipes from excess air pressure upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature, pressure-responsive means connected to the distributing pipes and operable upon diminution of the amount of air pressure in said pipes, a supplemental control valve element comprising a cylinder, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder and a valve stem connecting said piston and main control valve together, said piston normally being under thei pressure of the extinguishing uid to hold the main control valve in closed position, a pivoted detent connected to said pressure-responsive means and operable thereby, a weighted element normally held against movement by said detent and means actuated upon release of said weighted element to change the direction oi.' pressure oi' the extinguishing fluid against the piston and thereby force the main control valve into open position.

7. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing iiuid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the inuence of air under pressure, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted on the distributing pipes and adapted i'or opening under the iniluence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve adapted to control the admission of said fluid to the system, means carried by said system for-relieving said pipes from excess air pressure upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature. an air pressure chamber, a flexible diaphragm carried thereby and under the inuence of the pressure of air in the distributing pipes, a supplemental control valve element comprising a cylinder, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder, means connecting said piston and main control valve together, a rotatable four-way valve connected to thesource of extinguishing uid and to either side of said piston to force it to move in a direction to either open or close the main control valve, a Weighted element connected to said four-way valve and movable therewith and a pivoted detent engaging said diaphragm and normally holding said weighted element against movement and adapted to release the same to actuate the four-Way valve upon diminution oi pressure in the distributing pipes.

8. In a iire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communition therewith and normally under the iniiuence of air under pressure, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted on the distributing pipes and adapted for opening under the influence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve adapted to control the admission of said iiuid to the system, a relief valve connected to the ysystem for permitting the escape of the air taining the main control valve in closed position,

a shaft, a. rotatable four-way valve" mounted on said shaft and connected to the source of extinguishing uid and to-said cylinder at either side of said piston to close or open said main control valvelby iiuid pressure exerted against said piston, a weighted element mounted on said shaft and rotatable therewith and a pivoted detent engaging said diaphragm and normally holding said weighted element against movement and adapted to release the same to rotate said shaft and thereby change the position of said four-way valve to open said main control valve upon diminution of pressure in the distributing pipes.

9. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the iniluence of compressed air, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted at intervals on the distributing pipes and adapted for fusing and opening under the influence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve for controlling the admission of the extinguishing iuid to said distributing pipes, a relief valve connected t'o the system for permitting the escape of air under pressure in the distributing pipes upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing fluid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, an air pressure chamber connected to the distributing pipes, movable means thereon operable upon the escape of the aforesaid air pressure, a supplemental control element connected to said main control valve and adapted to hold the main control valve in closed position by pressure exerted against said supplemental element by the extinguishing fluid in one direction, valve means connected to said movable means and to the source of extinguishing fluid for reversing the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against said supplemental control element while freeing said control element from any pressure exerted in said one direction to open said main control valve upon diminution of pressure in said distributing pipes, a signal and a liquid pressure-responsive device connected to the source of extinguishing iiuid and operable upon a diminution of the pressure of Said extinguishing fluid from said source to energize said signal.

10. In a iire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the said distributing pipes, a relief valve connected to the system for permitting the escape of air under pressure in the distributing pipes upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing fluid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, an air pressure chamber connected to the distributing pipes, movable means thereon operable upon the escape of the aforesaid air pressure, a supplemental control element connected to said main control valve and adapted to hold the main control valve in closed position by pressure exerted against said supplemental element by the extinguishing fluid in one direction, valvefmeans connected to said movable means and to the source of extinguishing fluid for reversing the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against said supplementalcontrol element while freeing said control element from pressure in said one direction to open said main control valve upon diminution of pressure in said distributing pipes, a signal, a source i' current supply connected to said signal, a liquid pressure-responsive chamber connected to the source of extinguishing uid beneath the aforesaid main control valve and a s switch connected to the source of current supply,

to said signal and to said liquid pressure-responsive chamber and adapted to energize said signal upon diminution in the pressure of said extinguishing fluid.

11. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the influence of compressed air, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted at intervals on the distributing pipes and adapted for fusing and opening under the influence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve for controlling the admission of the extinguishing fluid to said distributing pipes, a relief valve connected to the system for permitting the escape of air under pressure in the distributing pipes upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing uid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, a supplemental control element connected to themain control valve and normally under the influence of the pressure of the extinguishing iluidin vone direction to hold the kmain control valve in closed position, means automatically operable upon the aforesaid escape oi' air under pressure to reverse the. direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluidagainst said supplemental control element while freeing said control element of pressure in said one direction and thereby open said main control valve, an air compressor connected to the system for automatically increasing the pressure of air therein when it fallsl below a predetermined amount, an automatic pressure-responsive switch connected to said air compressor and to the system and under the influence of the air pressure in the system, driving means connected to said air cornpressor and a source of current supply connected to said pressure-responsive switch and said driving means.

12. In a fire controlling' and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in communication therewith and normally under the iniluence of compressed air, normally closed fusible sprinkler heads mounted at intervals on the d istributing pipes and adapted for fusing and opening under the influence of a predetermined degree of heat, a main control valve for controlling the admission of the extinguishing fluid to said distributing pipes, a relief valve connected to the system for permitting the escape of air under pressure in the distributing pipes upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature to condition the f system with extinguishing fluid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, a supplemental control element connected to the main control valve and under the influence of the pressure of the extinguishing fluid in one direction to normally hold the main control valve in closed position, means automatically operable upon the aforesaid escape of air under pressure to reverse the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against said supplemental control element while freeing said control element from pressure in said one direction and thereby open said main control valve, a gate valve positioned below the main control valve for controlling the flow of extinguishing iluid from the source of supply thereto, manual means for operating the same, a source of current supply, a switch associated with said gate valve and said source of current supply, a signal connected to said source of current supply and said switch and connecting means between said switch and gate valve and operable to close said switch and energize the signal upon manipulation of the manual means in a direction for closing the gate valve.

13. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing iluid under pressure, a distributing pipe in connection therewith and normally under the influence of air under pressure, a normally closed fusible sprinkler head connected to said distributing pipe and adapted to open upon the attainment of a predetermined fixed degree of temperature, a rate-of-rise relief valve connected to the system for relieving the pressure of air therein upon a sudden rise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing uid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, a main control valve for controlling the flow of the extinguishing fluid to the distributing pipe and operable for either opening or closing by selective pressure of the extinguishing fluid thereagalnst in one direction while releasing pressure thereagainst in the opposite direction, said l control valve being normally held closed by the pressure of said extinguishing fluid, an air pressure responsive device connected to the system and responsive to a variation in the air pressure therein and means connected to said air pressure responsive device and main control valve and automatically actuated by said air pressure responsive device to reverse the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against said main control valve for opening the same.

14. In a fire controlling and extinguishing' system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in connection therewith and with each other and normally under the influence of air under pressure, normally closed sprinkler heads connected to said distributing pipes` and adapted to open upon the attainment of a predetermined fixed degree of temperature, a rate-of-rise relief valve connected to the system for relieving the pressure of air therein upon an abnormal rate of rise in temperature to permit the extinguishing fluid to ilow to the distributing pipes and condition the system prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, a main control valve for controlling the flowof the extinguishing fluid to the distributing pipes and movable to open or closed position by pressure exerted thereagainst by the extinguishing uid, an air prespressure responsive device and said main con trol valve for automatically reversing the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid from one side of the main control valve to the other side while releasing said one side from pressure upon a variation in the air pressure in the system and thereby change the position of said main control valve.

15. In a ilre controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under Dressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in connection therewith and with each other and nrmally under the influence of air under pressure, normally closed sprinkler heads connected to said distributing pipes and adapted to be opened upon the attainment of a predetermined fixed degree of temperature, means connected to the system for relieving the pressure of air therein upon an abnormal rate-of-rise of temperature to condition the system with extinguishing fluid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, a main control valve for controlling the flow of the extinguishing uid to the system, a supplemental device connected to said main control valve and normally subjected to the pressure of the extinguish- 16. In a flre controlling and extinguishing sys-l tem, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in connection therewith and with each other and under the influence of the pressure of air of means for automatically relieving said distributing pipes from said air pressure upon a sudden rate-of-rise of temperature to condition the system with extinguishing fluid, normally closed sprinkler heads connected to said distributing pipes and adapted to open upon the attainment of a xed degree of temperature, a main control valve for controlling the flow of extinguishing fluid from its source to said distributing pipes and movable by pressure of the extinguishing fluid, air pressure responsive meansconnected to the system and normally under the influence of the air pressure therein and a reversing valve connecting said main control valve and air pressure responsive means and adapted to open said main control valve upon actuation of said relieving means and a consequent decrease in pressure against said air pressure responsive means, said reversing valve being selectively operable to reverse the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid from one side of the control valve to the other side while simultaneously freeing said one side from fluid pressure. n

17. In a ilre controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in connection therewith and with each other and normally under the influence of air under pressure, fusible sprinkler heads connected to said distributing pipes and operable upon the attainment of a predetermined fixed degree of temperature, a rate-of-rise relief valve connected to the system QUSSMBQB forrelievingthe pressure of air therein upon s.

sudden rise in temperature to.condition the system with extinguishing fluid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, a main control valve for controlling the flow of the extinguishing fluid to the distributing pipes and operable by the pressure of the extinguishing fluid which normally holds the main control valve in closed position, an air pressure responsive device connected to the system and actuated by actuation of said relief valve, means connected to said air responsive device and main control valve and automatically actuated by said air responsive device to reverse the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against the main control valve from one side thereof to the other side while simultaneously freeing said one side from fluid pressure for opening the same, a signal and means for actuating said signal comprising an extinguishing fluid responsive device therefor operative upon diminution of extinguishing fluid pres- Sure.

18. In a flre controlling and extinguishing sysabnormal rate of rise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing fluid prior to the -opening of a sprinkler head, a main control valve for controlling the flow of the extinguishing fluid to the distributing pipes and operable by the pressure of the extinguishing fluid which normally holds the main control valve in closed position, an air pressure responsive device connected to the system and actuated by actuation ofsaid relief valve, a reversing valve connected to said air responsive device and main control valve and automatically actuated by said air responsive device to reverse thedirectionof pressure of the extinguishing fluid against the main control valve from one side thereof to the opposite side while simultaneously freeing said one side from fluid pressure for opening 'the control valve, an air pressure responsive device connected to the system, a switch connected thereto and adapted for closing upon a fall in pressure in said air responsive device and an air compressor connected to the system and to said switch for automatic actuation to increase the pressure of air in the system upon the closing of said switch.

19. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure, a plurality of distributing pipes in connection therewith and with each other and normally under the influence of air under pressure, fusible sprinkler heads connected to said distributing pipes and operable upon the attainment of a predetermined fixed degree of temperature, a rateof-rise relief valve connected to the system for relieving the pressure of air therein upon an abnormal rate of rise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing fluid prior to the opening of a sprinkler head, a main control valve for controlling the flow of the extinguishing fluid to the distributing pipes and operable by the pressure of the extinguishing fluid which normally holds the main control valve in closed position, an air pressure responsive device connected to thesystem and actuated by actuation of said l relief valve, means connected to said air responsive device and main control valve and automatically actuated by said air responsive device to change the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against the main control valve from one side thereof to the opposite side While simultaneously freeing said one side from iiuid pres-l sure for opening the'control valve, a gate valve for controlling the admission of the extinguishing uid to the main control valve, a notched stem connected thereto, means connected to said stern for manually operating said gate valve, a signal and means engaging the notch in said stem when the gate valve is in open position and adapted to become disengaged from said notch to actuate said signal upon manipulation of said manual means in a direction to close said gate valve.

20. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing iluid under pressure, a distributing pipe in connection therewith and normally under the iniiuence of air under pressure, a normally closed sprinkler head connected to said distributing pipe and adapted to open upon the attainment of a predetermined xed degree of temperature, a rate-of-rise relief valve connected to the system for relieving the pressure of air therein upon an labnormal rate of rise in temperature to condition the system with extinguishing iluid prior to the opening of the sprinkler head, a main control valve for controlling the flow of the extinguishing fluid to the distributing pipe and operable for opening or closing by the pressure of the extinguishing fluid thereagainst and normally held closed by said extinguishing fluid, an air pressure responsive device connected to the System and responsive to a variation in the air pressure therein, a reversing valve connected to said air responsive device and main control valve and automatically actuated by said air responsive device to change the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against said main control valve from one side thereoi7 to the opposite side while simultaneously freeing said one side from fluid pressure for opening the control valve, and means for giving a visual indication of the position of said main control valve.

21. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid under pressure. a distributing pipe in connection therewith and normally under the influence of air under pressure, a normally closed sprinkler head connected to said distributing pipe and adapted to open under the influence of heat to relieve the pressure of air in the distributing pipe and to discharge the extinguishing iluid, a main control valve for controlling the flow of the extinguishing fluid to the distributing pipe and operable for opening or,closing by the pressure oi' the extinguishing fluid thereagainst and normally held closed by said extinguishing fluid, an air pressure responsive device connected to the'system and responsive to a variation in the air pressure therein and a reversing valve connected to said air responsive device and said main control valve and automatically actuated by said air responsive device to change the direction of pressure of the extinguishing fluid against said main control valve for opening the same, said reversing valve being selectively operable topermit the full pressure of the extinguishing fluid to be exerted against said main control valve in one direction while simultaneously freeing said control valve from pressure exerted in a different direction.

22. In a fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid, a riser connected to the system, a distributing pipe connected to said riser, said riser and distributing pipe normally containing air under pressure other than atmospheric pressure, a main control valve for controlling the supply of extinguishing fluid to said riser and distributing pipe and adapted to be moved to closed and open position by the pressure of the extinguishing fluid and to be held in either position by said fluid, a normally closed sprinkler head mounted on said distributing pipe and adapted to be opened upon the attainment of a predetermined degree of temperature, a relief device communicating with said sprinkler head and automatically operable upon an abnormal rate-of-rise in temperature to vary the amount of the pressure of air in the riser and distributing pipe sufficiently to condition them for the reception of extinguishing fluid upon the opening of the main control valve and prior to the opening of the sprinkler head, a pressureresponsive device connected to the4 system and responsive to a variation of pressure therein and means vcontrolled by said pressure-responsive device and controlling the operation of the main control valve, said means being operative to control the flow of the extinguishing fluid to close the valve and to normally hold it closed when the pressure-responsive device is inactive and to control the flow of the extinguishing fluid to open the valve when the pressure-responsive device is actuated.

23. In a dry-pipe fire controlling and extinguishing system, a source of extinguishing fluid, a. riser connected to the system, a distributing pipe connected to said riser, said riser and distributing pipe normally being free from extinguishing fluid, a main control valve for control-l ling the `supply of extinguishing fluid to said riser and distributing pipe and adapted to be moved to closed and open positions by the extinguishing fluid and held in either position by said fluid, a

normally closed sprinkler head mounted on said distributing pipe and adapted to open under the influence of heat, a pressure-responsive device connected t0 the system and operable upon the opening of the sprinkler head and means controlled by said pressure-responsive device and controlling the operation oi? the main control valve, said means being operative to control the flow of the extinguishing fluid to close the valve and to normally hold it closed when the pressureresponsive device is inactive and to control the flow of the extinguishing fluid to open the valve when the pressure-responsive device is actuated.

' ERNEST'A. LOWE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2421303 *Dec 11, 1942May 27, 1947Houten Stephen T VanFire extinguishing system
US2471241 *Jan 14, 1948May 24, 1949Automatic Sprinkler CoFluid valve and remote-control system
US2542080 *Mar 19, 1948Feb 20, 1951Herrbold William JSprinkler head for fire-extinguishing systems
US3367365 *May 25, 1966Feb 6, 1968Orbit Valve CoValve
US3814375 *Aug 16, 1971Jun 4, 1974Sulzer AgShut-off valve and control system therefor
US4051467 *Feb 5, 1976Sep 27, 1977American District Telegraph CompanyFluid flow detector for a fire alarm system
US4212004 *Apr 25, 1978Jul 8, 1980Benefis Systems LimitedPressure drop detectors
US5236049 *Dec 24, 1991Aug 17, 1993Securite Polygon Inc.For connection to a control bus of a fire alarm system
US7710282Jul 1, 2005May 4, 2010Richard YoungApparatus for flow detection, measurement and control and method for use of same
US7921577 *Sep 7, 2007Apr 12, 2011Victaulic CompanyMethod and apparatus for drying sprinkler piping networks
US8316839 *Nov 11, 2010Nov 27, 2012Kbs Automist, LlcRange exhaust cleaning system and method
US8746231 *Nov 26, 2012Jun 10, 2014Kbs Automist, LlcRange exhaust cleaning system and method
US20110048397 *Nov 11, 2010Mar 3, 2011Kellogg, Bruns & Smeija, LLCRange exhaust cleaning system and method
US20130074823 *Nov 26, 2012Mar 28, 2013Kellogg, Bruns & Smieja, LlcRange exhaust cleaning system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification169/17, 116/277, 340/589, 137/557, 251/28, 340/626, 340/289, 137/554, 137/613
International ClassificationA62C35/58, A62C35/60
Cooperative ClassificationA62C35/605
European ClassificationA62C35/60B