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Publication numberUS2334914 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1943
Filing dateJan 16, 1939
Priority dateMay 19, 1932
Publication numberUS 2334914 A, US 2334914A, US-A-2334914, US2334914 A, US2334914A
InventorsCarl E Erickson
Original AssigneeCarl E Erickson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for cleaning rugs, carpets, and the like
US 2334914 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 23, 1943. Q ERICKSON 2,334,914

MACHINE FOR CLEANING BUGS; cARPETs, AND THE LIKE Filed Jan. 1 19:59 s Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. C'af/ E Z'Hckdon ATTORNEY$ Nov. 23, 1943. d. EJERICKSON $3 MACHINE FOR CLEANiNG- Rims,- cums, AND THE LIKE File; J an. 1s, 1959 3 Shets-Sheet s v v 4 1 ENTVOR. I ('or/ Ef 22600 ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 23, 1943 'MACHHNE FOR CL an. mics,

This invention relates to improvements in machine for cleaning rugs, carpets, and the like.

The main objects of this invention are:

First, to provide a machine for cleaning rugs, carpets, and the like which is well adapted for domestic use or use by an unskilled workman.

Second, to provide an attachment for vacuum cleaners, carpet sweepers, and the like adapted to convert the same into a machine for scrubbing rugs, carpets, and the like and for applying a limited amount of moisture or cleaning fluid in advance of the cleaner.

Third, to provide a machine of the class described in which the cleaning fluid is applied in a manner to avoid excessive or undesirable wetting of the surface to which it is applied and also in a manner to permit its being effectively removed with the loosened and moistened dirt or dust.

Fourth, to provide a device of the character described adapted to apply a cleaning fluid in the form of a foam or an aggregation of bubbles to the rug, the vacuum cleaneriurnishing the air for producing the foam or bubbles.

Fifth, to provide a device for applying cleaning fluid in the form of suds or foam or bubbles to the surface to be cleaned.

Sixth, to provide a novel method of cleaning rugs, carpets, and the like.

Objects relating to details and economies of the invention will appear from the description to follow. The invention is defined in the claims.

Preferred embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation illustrating a vacuum cleaner of well known type having the foam or bubble producing and applying devices of the invention attached thereto to thereby constitute a rug cleaning machine in accordance with the invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary front view looking to the left in Fig. 1, further illustrating the construction.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view in sideelevation of the assembly illustrated in Fig. 1, being partially in vertical section on line 33 of Figs. 2 and 4 to further illustrate the details of construction.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view in section on line 44 of Fig. 3. i

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary detail view in section on line .5-5 of Fig. 1, illustrating the removable sediment chamber constituting a part of the invention.

Fig. 6 is a detail view in section on line 8-6 of Fig. 1.

Fig. ,7 illustrates a modified embodiment of my invention as applied to a carpet sweeper, being a view in longitudinal vertical section on line l-'| of Fig. 8.

Fig. 8 is a view in section on line 88 of Fig. '7, illustrating details of the modified construction.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary view in vertical transverse section on line 9-9 of Fig. '7.

The present invention is concerned with a novel method of cleaning carpets, rugs, and the like by first applying a layer of a cleanin substance in' the form of foam or suds to a rug or carpet and then continuously picking up the said layer and dirt particles which have been loosened from the rug or carpet thereby, the aforesaid steps of laying down and picking up the cleaning agent being performed continuously by traversing the machine of my invention across thesurface of the rug or carpet. In order to make possible this operation, the machine or device includes novel means for continuously producing and applying a uniform quantity of the cleaning agent in the form of foam or suds, the said means being embodied either in a conventional carpet cleaner and actuated in the usual movement thereof or being in the form of an attachment readily assembled on a vacuum cleaner of well known types and in assembled condition constituting the cleaner an effective scrubbing machine.

Referring to the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Figs. 1 to 6 of the accompanying drawings, the reference numeral I indicates a known type of vacuum cleaner, the brush 2 being mounted in the suction head or nozzle 3 at the front of the cleaner. The motor arranged within the housing 4 produces the suction. The handle 5 is designed to manipulate the cleaner on the surface to be cleaned as is readily understood.

The cleaning solution applying device of this embodiment of my invention consists of the casing 6 having a rearwardly extending bracket I provided with an adjustable clamping member 8 to clamp the device to the head 3 of the suction cleaner as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3. The

\ clamp is provided with an adjusting screw 9 provided with a suitable finger piece or head adapted to be manipulated with the fingers so that the device can be readily attached to or removed from the suction cleaner.

The casing 6 is provided with a combined bubble or suds forming chamber and reservoir La float chamber H, and a supplyreservoir l2. The float chamber and the combined bubble and reservoir chamber are separated by the longitudinal partition I3 which has openings l4 in the bottom thereof connecting the two chambers. The float l5 controls an inlet valve which controls the delivery of liquid from the chamber l2, the delivery pipe being indicated at IS, the valve being generally indicated by the numeral 11, see Fig; 4.

One of the main reasons for providing this float controlled feed chamber is to prevent the agitation of the float such as might result if the float were disposed directly in the liquid of the bubble or foam forming chamber.

The supply 'chamber i2 is provided with a filler opening having a closure l8.

It will be noted that the chamber In is rela- 24. This pipe is connected by the hose or tubing to the discharge of the vacuum cleaner so that air under pressure is supplied to the bubble pipe with the result that air is forced through the jet orifices of the cleaning solution producing bubbles or foam which are discharged downwardly from the chamber l0 onto the surface to be cleaned.

I preferably provide a cleaning solution which suds or produces bubbles freely when it is agitated by the discharge of the air jets therein. The

quantity of bubbles can be regulated by the amount of air discharged and I conventionally illustrate a valve in the air connection 25 at 26.

In the embodiment illustrated, I provide a dirt collecting chamber 21 to receive the blast of air from the cleaner, this being arranged between the delivery nozzle 28 of the cleaner and the dust bag 29. Ordinarily the dust bag is provided with a chuck or coupling 30 adapted to be engaged with the nippleA28. To make the parts readily adaptable, the dirt collecting chamber 21 is provided with a chuck or coupling 3| at its front end adapted to be engaged with the nipple 2B and with a nipple 32 at its rear end adapted to receive the dust bag coupling 30. The air connection 25 is provided with a pipe 33 disposed within the dust collector 21 and having a flared mouth 34 arranged centrally of the coupling 3! so as to effectively receive the blast of air.

The housing or casing 6 is preferably provided with caster wheels having supporting springs 36. These springs are adapted to yield somewhat to accommodate for the varying positioning of the casing as might result from the adjustment of the clamp or attaching means to the chuck head or to the part of the cleaner to which it may be attached. In operation, the discharge of air through the bubble pipe into the cleaning solution produces a very substantial aggregate or quantity of bubbles and these are discharged downwardly upon the surface to be cleaned, moistening the same and loosening the dust and dirt which is immediately picked up by the cleaner, a very effective combination being a cleaner embodying the brush as indicated in this embodiment of Figs. 1 to 6 inclusive. There is of course a substantial tendency for the bubbles to burst as they are applied to the surface but commonly a. substantial portion of them do not burst until they are picked up by the brush or the suction together with dirt or dust that may be trapped by or adhere thereto. The application of the cleaning fluid in this manner enables a very uniform spreading of the same upon the surface to be cleaned without undue or undesired wetting of the surface and very little moisture is left after the machine has passed over the surface. Of course, the machine may be repeatedly passed over a particularly soiled portion of the rug or carpet or over portions which are most frequently used thereby acquiring more dirt and the dirt being more thoroughly ground into or embodied into the rug. The machine may be passed several times over a surface without the surface becoming objectionably wet or saturated. The suction cleaner illustrated is of the Hoover brush type. However, it will be understood that my cleaning solution applying device may be readily adapted for other types of cleaners, the main modifica- .tion being in the form of the clamping or attaching means.

In Figs. '7, 8 and 9, I illustrate an embodi-v ment of my invention in a carpet sweeper type of cleaner. In this embodiment, the casing 31 is provided with a combined bubble forming or suds chamber 38, a-reservoir 39, a pump chamber 40, and an air chamber ii between the pump chambar and the reservoir 39, see Fig. '7. In the accompanying drawings, these parts are shown mainly as an integral casting but it will be understood that they may be made up of suitably joined parts. The supply chamber 29 is separated from the chamber 38v by means of the longitudinal partition 42 which has a forwardly curved top portion 23 coacting with the inwardly curved front wall ed in providing an elongated downwardly directed discharge throat 45 for the chamber 38. The bubble pipe 46 is disposed in the bottom of the chamber 38 and is provided with downwardly directed jets 41, this pipe being connected by the connection 48 to the chamber M.

Within thepump chamber, I provide a plurality of pumps, the cylinders 49 of which are shown as formed integrally with the casing and connected by the manifold 50 to the chamber 4|, each pump cylinder being provided with a delivery valve 52, see Fig. 7. The pump pistons 53 are provided with connecting rods 54 connecting the pistons to the crank axle 55 for the rear pair of wheels 56. The rear wheels 56 and the front wheels 51 are operatively associated with the rotary brush 58 to drive the brush. Dust pans 60 are provided at each side of the brush. The pump chamber 40 has an air inlet 6|, the pump cylinders being connected thereto through the valve chambers 62 provided with ball valves 63. The handle for manipulating the sweeper is indicated at 64. The bottom of the pump chamber is closed by the wall member 65 so that the brush and the pans are effectively housed and entirely separated from the chambers described. One of the advantages of this is that in operation the moistened dirt picked up tends to stick or adhere to the dust pans and to the bottom of the casing or the inner side of the top chamber in which the dust pan and the brush are housed. By this arrangement, the dust pan can be removed, being secured by means of screws or other attaching devices 66, and the dust pans and walls of the brush chamber cleaned. Indeed, a hose might be used for this purpose as there is nothing about the'device that would be injured by the application of water and it is desirable to keep the brush clean.

The brush is supported by the hangers 61 provided with bearings for the brush spindle, the brush spindle being provided with rollers 68 coacting with the rubber tires 69 of the wheels, springs acting to urge the rollers into frictional engagement with the wheels. These springs are detachably engaged with the ears H affording a means for ready detachment and attachment of the brush.

I have illustrated a plunger type of pump. It will be understood that bellows or fan types might be employed and the number varied as desired. In the embodiment illustrated, I provide three pumps of the plunger type, the throws of the axle 55 being arranged in angularly oflset relation to maintain a fairly uniform delivery of air. It is not necessary to have heavy airpressure but it is desirable that the air pressure be fairly uniform or constant in order to secure the delivery of a fairly uniform quantity of the cleaning fluid. i

I have illustrated and described embodiments of my invention-one designed primarily to be used as an attachment for carpet sweepers of the vacuum cleaning type, and the other an embodiment in a carpet sweeper of the manually operated brush type for use in instances where electric current is not available for driving the cleaner.

I have not attempted to illustrate or describe other modifications or adaptations of my invention as it is believed that this disclosure will enable those skilled in the art to embody or adapt my invention as may be desired.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. The combination with a vacuum cleaner provided with a brush, of a wheeled casing provided with means for attachment at the front of the cleaner for manipulation therewith, said casing being provided with a relatively narrow elongated bubble chamber adapted to contain a liquid and having a downwardly directed dis charge, a liquid supply reservoir, a floatchamher to which said liquid supply reservoir delivers, said float chamber communicating with said bubble chamber through restricted openings at the bottom thereof, an air delivery pipe constituting a bubble pipe disposed longitudinally of the bubble chamber adjacent the bottom thereof and having a plurality ofv downwardly directedmanipulation therewith, said casing being provided with a relatively narrow elongated bubble chamber adapted to contain a liquid and having a downwardly directed discharge above the liquid level thereof, a liquid supply reservoir, a float chamber to which said liquid supply reservoir delivers, said float chamber communicating with said bubble chamber through restricted openings at the bottom thereof, an air delivery pipe constitutinga bubble pipe disposed longitudinally of the bubble chamber adjacent the bottom thereof and having a plurality of downwardly directed .iet openings, and means for sup lying air under pressure to the pipe for producing an aggregation of bubbles which are discharged downwardly from the bubble chamber upon the surface to be cleaned, the discharge of the chamber being'provided with s'pac'ed discharge directing members extending substantially across the bubble chamber.

I 3. The combination of a translatable casing provided with a bubble chamber adapted to contain a liquid and having a gravity discharge above the liquid level thereof, means for discharging air under pressure internally of the liquid for producing a copious aggregation of bubbles which rise vertically in the chamber and are gently discharged by gravity alone from the discharge upon the surface to be cleaned, the discharge of the chamber being provided with spaced discharge directing members extending substantially across the bubble chamber, and vacuum means and rotary brush means journaled onan axis parallel to the path of translation of the casing, said vacuum and brush means being associated with the casing immediately to the'rear of the chamber discharge thereof to pick up and remove bubbles and dirt carried thereby without substantially working the same into the surface.

4. The combination of a casing provided with a bubble chamber adapted to contain a liquid and having a discharge above the liquid level thereof, of means for discharging air under pressure internally of the liquid for producing a copious aggregation of bubbles which rise vertically in the chamber and are gently discharged by gravity alone from the discharge upon the surface to be cleaned, and rotary brush means journaled on an axis transverse to the path of translation of the casing, said brush means being connected to the casing and disposed immediately to the rearof the chamber discharge thereof to pick up and remove bubbles and dirt from said surface without substantially working the same into the surface, said discharge being .from the bubble chamber forwardly and downwardly directly onto the surface to be cleaned, and rotary brush means associated with said casing immediately to the rear of said chamber discharge, said brush means being journaled on an axis transverse to the path of translation of the casing and serving to pick up said bubbles following deposition thereof on the surface without substantially working the bubbles into the surface, said discharge being suificiently in advance of said brush means to deposit said bubbles directly upon said surface in advance of and out of contact with the brush means to avoid extencarrying wheels, a rotary brush associated with said carrying wheels to be driven thereby, dust pans at each side of said rotary brush-said several chambers being closed from said dust pans and brush, an air pump disposed in said pump chamber to deliver to said air chamber and having driving connection with at least one of said wheels, and a bubble pipe disposed longitudinal ly of said bubble chamber to discharge air below the liquid level thereof and in communication with saidair chamber. ,v '1,

7. In a structure of theclass described,-'{the combination of a casing provided with a relas tively narrow elongated bubble chamber adapted a a liquid reservoir and having a downwardly directed discharge throat at the top thereof, carrying wheels, a rotary brush associatedwith said carrying wheels to be driven thereby, dust pans at each side of said rotary" brush, said chambers being closed from said dust pans and brush, an air pump disposed in said pump chambar to deliver to said air chamber and having driving connection with at least one of said wheels, and a bubble pipe disposed longitudinally of saidbubble chamber to discharge air below the liquid level thereof and in communication withsaid pump.

'8. In a structure of the class described, the

combination of a casing provided with a bubble" chamber adapted as a liquid reservoir and hav ing a downwardly directed discharge above the liquid level thereof, carrying wheels, a rotary brush associated with said carrying wheels to be driven thereby, an air pump having driving con nection with certain of said carrying wheels, and a bubble pipe disposed in said bubble chamber to a bubble chamber adapted as a liquid reservoir, a bubble pipe disposed longitudinally of said bubble chamber below the liquid level thereof and having a\p1urality of jet openings therein, and a plurality of pumps provided with pistons operatively connected to said crank axle, said casing being provided with an air chamber to which said pump delivers, said bubble pipe being in'communication with said air chamber.

11. The method of cleaning rugs, carpets, or like surfaces comprising translating a supply of liquid cleaning agent adapted for the production of bubbles across the surface to be cleaned, aerating and agitating said liquid below the surface of the liquid to thereby produce a substantial quantity of foam, applying said foam directly onto the surface to be cleaned solely by gravity and without forcing the foam thereagainst, said application of foam taking place continuously and simultaneously with the production thereof, and brushing the surface immediately subsequent to the deposition of the foam thereon in a man- I ner to remove the foam without working the same,

substantially into the body of the rug or carpet or the like, the foam being applied to, the'surface independently of said brushing action to avoid extensive working of the same into said body.

12. The method of cleaning rugs, carpets, and

a copious quantity of light, frothy foam from said supply, applying said foam solely by gravity directly and lightly onto the surface during production thereof and without forcing the same against the surface, and brushing the surface immediately following said application to lift the foam from said surface without working the same slibstantially into the base of the rug or carpet, whereby to remove foam and particles of dirt and dust loosened and picked up thereby, the application of the foam to said'surface being effected independentlyof said brushing action.

13. The method of cleaning rugs, carpets, and the like, comprising translating a brush across a surface to be cleaned, continuously bubbling a'ir gthrough a supply of liquid cleaning solution discharge air below the liquid level thereof and in communication with said air pumpl v 9. In a machine of the class described, the

combination of a casing provided with pairs of wheels, the rear pair of wheels being provided with a crank axle, a rotary brush operatively 5' associated, with said wheels to be driven thereby,

a narrow elongated bubble chamber adapted as a liquid reservoir and provided with a supply reservoir in said casing, a bubble pipe disposed longitudinally at the bottom of said bubble chamber and having a plurality of downwardly directed jet openings therein, a pump chamber at the rear of said casing provided with a plurality of upright cylinders, each cylinder being provided with an inlet valve communicating with said pump simultaneously with said translation to agitate and aerate the same and produce a quantity of foam, and simultaneously and-continuously applying said foam solely by gravity directly and lightly on to the surface in advance of and out of contact with said brush during the translation whereby to loosen and collect dirt on the surface prior to being picked up by the brush. I

-14. The method of cleaning rugs, carpets and the like comprising the steps of translating a container of liquid cleaning agent across the surface to be cleaned, subjecting liquid cleaning agent in the-container to agitation by bubbling fluid therethrough during translation across the surface to I be cleaned to generate an aggregation of bubbles sufficient to overflow the container onto the surface, and immediately thereafter subjecting the surface to which the liquid solution has been so applied to a brushing cleaning operation. to remove the bubbles and dirt entrained therein from a the like comprising the steps of producing an aggregation of bubbles and, while producing the bles solely by gravity directly upon the surface to be cleaned, and immediately thereafter sub-o jecting the bubble covered surface to'a combined brushing and suction cleaning operation, to remove the bubbles and dirt entrained therein from the rug or carpet surface without working the same substantially into the surface, the initial application of said bubbles to said surface being effected independently of said cleaning operation.

16. The'method of cleaning rugs, carpets and the like comprising the steps of producing an aggregation of bubbles, and while producing the same, gently discharging the aggregation of bubbles solely by gravity directly upon the surface to be cleaned, and immediately thereafter subjest-ing the bubble covered surface to a brushing cleaning operation, to remove the bubbles and dirt entrained therein from the rug or carpet surface without working the same substantially into the surface, the initial application of said bubbles to said surface being effected independ"- ently of said cleaning operation.

17. The method of cleaning rugs, carpets and the like comprising the steps of producing an aggregation of bubbles and, while producing the same, gently discharging the aggregation of bubbles solely by gravity directly upon the sur; face to be cleaned and immediately thereafter subjecting the bubble covered surface to a sue-'- tion cleaning operation, to remove the bubbles and dirt entrained therein from the mg or carpet surface without working the same substantially into the surface, the initial application of said bubbles to said surface being effected independently of said cleaning operation.

18. The method of cleaning rugs, carpets and the like comprising the steps of producing an aggregation'of bubbles and, while producing the same, gently discharging the aggregation of bubbles solely by gravity directly upon the sur production thereof, and means for subsequently brushing the surface.

20. A device for cleaning rugs, carpets, and the like,-comprising means for receiving and translating a supply of liquid cleaning agent, means on the device for applying fluid pressure to said supply internally thereof to aerate and agitate the same during translation and thereby produce a substantial quantity of foam, means for gently applying said foam by gravity alone to the surface to be cleaned simultaneously with the production thereof of further foam and means connected to and translated with said supply for subsequently removing said foam from the surface without substantially working the same into the surface, said applying means being positioned in advance of said removing means sufficiently to apply the foam to the surface independently of face to be cleaned, and immediately thereafter subjecting the covered surface to a cleaning operation to remove the bubbles and dirt entrained therein from the rug or carpet surface without working the same substantially into the surface,-

the initial application of said bubbles to said surface being effected independently of said cleaning operation.

19. A device for cleaning rugs, carpets, and the like, comprising means for receiving and translating a supply of liquid cleaning agent, means on the device and actuated in response to movesaid removing means.

'21. In a cleaning apparatus of the class de-. scribed the ccmbination of a vacuum cleaner hav' ing mounted thereon an elongated liquid tank extending across the front of said cleaner, said tank having a curved top wall and a front wall, the upper edge of which is spaced substantially from the top wall providing a forward tank mouth of substantial width and length extending longitudinally of the tank, said front wall having a downwardly inclined discharge portion for the discharfie of suds generated within the tank solely by gravity between said curved top wall and inclined discharge portion directly onto a surface in advance of the cleaner, and means actuated for generating suds within the tank, the area of said mouth being of substantial size as compared to the area of liquid within the tank, whereby suds generated in said tank rise freely and unimpededly for discharge through said mouth and over said inclined discharge portion in advance of the cleaner without substantial constrictive action exerted thereon.

22. In a cleaning apparatus of the class described, the combination of an elongated liquid tank adapted to have suds generated therein, having a curved top wall and a front wall, the upper edge of which is spaced substantially from the top wall providing a forward tank mouth of substantial width and length extending longitudinally of the tank, said front wall having a downwardly inclined discharge portion for the discharge of suds generated within the tank between said curved top wall and inclined discharge portion onto a surface, the area of, said mouth being of substantial size as compared to the area of liquid within the tank, wherebyssuds generated in said'tank rise freely and unimpededly for discharge through said mouth and over said inclined discharge portion without substantial constrictive action exerted thereon.

' CARL E.ERICKSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2910720 *Jun 22, 1954Nov 3, 1959Smith Philip PMachine for cleaning rugs and the like
US2976112 *Oct 5, 1959Mar 21, 1961Bissell IncMethod of applying detergent to rugs and the like
US3035293 *Aug 22, 1956May 22, 1962Sherman L LarsonCar wash apparatus and controls therefor
US3075540 *May 22, 1961Jan 29, 1963Mckeegan Richard GFoam dispensing attachment for scrubbing machines
US3428985 *Feb 28, 1967Feb 25, 1969Certified Chem & Equipment CoFoam generator for rug cleaning machine
US3430280 *May 22, 1967Mar 4, 1969Advance Machine CoDevice for generating foam for a carpet and floor scrubbing machine
US3543321 *Oct 2, 1968Dec 1, 1970Charles D RaiaMethod and apparatus for washing floor coverings including carpets,rugs and the like
US3633240 *Feb 12, 1970Jan 11, 1972Electrolux AbSurface cleaning apparatus
US3676889 *Mar 2, 1970Jul 18, 1972William Joel Reginald EdlinCleaning apparatus for floor coverings
US3919729 *Aug 1, 1974Nov 18, 1975Servicemaster IndMethod for cleaning carpets
US4000536 *Jan 8, 1976Jan 4, 1977Nayfa James EFloor cleaning machine with foam dispensing system
US4507819 *Feb 16, 1984Apr 2, 1985Health-Mor, Inc.Power nozzle sudser for canister type vacuum cleaner
US4974618 *Sep 9, 1985Dec 4, 1990Duraclean International, Inc.Apparatus and method for fabric cleaning with foam
US5287590 *Sep 2, 1992Feb 22, 1994Yonkers Robert AWet vacuum/extractor with vacuum priming system
US5289611 *Sep 3, 1991Mar 1, 1994Bissell Inc.Extractor with manual priming pump
US6263539Dec 23, 1999Jul 24, 2001Taf BaigCarpet/floor cleaning wand and machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/137, 15/320, 15/50.1, 134/10, 261/121.1, 134/36, 134/21, 134/6
International ClassificationA47L11/32, A47L13/22, A47L13/20, A47L11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4083, A47L11/325, A47L11/4041, A47L13/22, A47L11/4094, A47L11/408
European ClassificationA47L11/40R, A47L11/40N2, A47L11/40N, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/32A, A47L13/22