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Publication numberUS2335096 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1943
Filing dateFeb 10, 1940
Priority dateFeb 10, 1940
Publication numberUS 2335096 A, US 2335096A, US-A-2335096, US2335096 A, US2335096A
InventorsAlfred Zech
Original AssigneeInd Wire Cloth Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil screen
US 2335096 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. ZECH OIL SCREEN Filed Feb. 10, 1940 FIG.3.

INVENTOR. ALFRED ZECH BY dzm s w/ A TTORNE Y5 Patented Nov. 23, 1943 OIL SCREEN Alfred Zech, Detroit, Mich, assignor to Industrial Wire Cloth Products Corporation, Wayne, Mich, a corporation of Michigan Application February 10, 1940, Serial No. 318,232

5 Claims.

The present invention relates to floating filters or screensand particularly to devices of this kind specially designed for use in the crankcase of internal combustion engines to screen oil passing to the oil-circulating means.

Among the objects of the invention is a screen of the kind indicated which isprovided with a .bypass involving no moving parts.

Another object is to further simplify the construction of such devices both in the formation of the parts and in their assembly.

Still another object is a device of the kind indicated which is constructed substantially entirely of sheet metal.

Other objects will readily occur to those skilled in the art upon reference to the following description and the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure 1 is a top plan View of the device with parts in central horizontal section.

Figure 2 is a sectional view on a central vertical plane with parts in elevation and without the outlet tube.

Figure 3 is an end elevation as from the right of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a section on line 4-4 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a section similar to Figure 4 but showing a modified form of construction.

In the drawing, the device is shown as made up of an outer stamped element ID of which the greater portion forms a bell and has extending from one side a channel Illa, this member being open at its bottom and provided with several ears Illb which are bent over to fix together the assembly.

Inverted in the bell Ill and with the edge soldered, brazed, or otherwise fixed in sealed relation to the inner surface of the bell, is a sheet metal cup II, serving as a sealed float chamber, and arranged in the space between cup II and the outer wall of bell I is a cylindrical screen l2, both ends of the screen cylinder being open.

The lower end of the screen I2 and the space between the bell wall and fioat is covered by a plate I3 provided with a plurality of Openings I3a through which oil may pass to the interior of screen I2 in the space between the latter and the float II. This plate I3 is held in place by bending over the ears I019.

The channel portion Illa, of bell Ill, is preferably closed by a separate plate I4 whose edges are bent over the flanged edge of channel Illa, as shown best in Figure 4.

As indicated in Figures 1, 2 and 4, the oil outlet is through a laterally projecting tube I passing through the side walls of channel Illa and riveted over as at I5a to hold it in place. This end of tube I5 is, of course, closed and a lateral opening I5b within the channel Illa permits the outpassage of the oil.

The tube l5 may be provided with peripheral ribs or shoulders I5c which allow the filter to be mounted for rotary movement around the axis of the tube without movement longitudinally thereof and this rotary movement is limited by the plate I6 formed with stop lugs Ilia.

The plate I6 is preferably provided with an opening for the passage of the tube I5, one of the shoulders I5c serving to hold the plate against channel Illa, and has its lower edge bent over the edge of plate I4, as shown in Figure i. This structure serves to prevent relative rotation of the plate IB and channel Illa as well as aiding in maintaining the plate I4 in place.

In order to prevent rotation of the tube I5 in its seats in the walls of channel Illa, the opening in the wall Illc of the channel is preferably provided with notches I5d into which some of the metal of the tube will be pressed during the riveting operation to fix it in place.

In Figure 5 is shown a modified form of outlet tube construction which ofiers some advantages.

In this figure the channel IIlla will be of substantially the form of Illa except that, instead of the opening receiving the end of the outlet tube, this far wall of the channel will be provided with a pressed in portion I I5a serving as a locator for the end of the outlet tube I I5. And the tube I I5, instead of being a screw machine part produced from a solid piece, will be a section of tubing.

In producing this structure, the tube II5, stop plate IIB, cover H4, and ring H50 and channel IIIla will be assembled and the parts brazed together.

As shown clearly in the drawing, the bell Ill and plate I3 may be so formed as to provide seats for the engaging parts, the cup II, for example, being seated in a suitable groove seat Ha and the screen I2 positioned by suitable shoulders IM and IZb.

Further, since in such devices provision must be made for passing oil by the screen in the case of clogging of the latter, the bell Ill is provided with a formed-up portion 20 Which permits passage of oil over the screen I2 at 2| from inside the latter to the space between the screen and the bell walls if and when it will not pass throug the screen.

Now having described the invention and the preferred embodiment thereof, what is claimed is:

1. A floating screen device for screening liquids,

comprising a bell portion having an integral channel portion communicating with the interior thereof, said bell and channel being open, a float chamber within said bell and spaced from the walls thereof, a screen dividing the space between said float chamber and said walls, cover means for closing the said space, said cover means being provided with openings leading to the inside of said screen, cover means for closing the open side of said channel portion, and outlet means for said channel portion.

2. In a floating screen, a sheet metal element constituting a bell with a channel extending therefrom, a substantially cylindrical screen having its upper edge seated in the upper wall of said bell and spaced from the side wall thereof,

closure means for said channel, closure means for said bell, the latter means being provided with a seat for the lower edge of said screen and with openings for admitting liquid to the interior of said screen, and means for conductin liquid from said channel outside of said screen.

3. In a floating screen, a sheet metal element constituting a bell with a channel extending therefrom, a substantially cylindrical screen having its upper edge seated in the upper wall of said bell and spaced from the side wall thereof, closure means for said channel, closure means for said bell, the latter means being provided with a seat for the lower edge of said screen and with openings for admitting liquid to the interior of said screen, means constituting a bypass for liquid from within said screen to said channel, said bypass means consisting of a portion of the upper wall of said bell elevated and spaced above the upper edge of said screen whereby to permit liquid to flow over said screen to said channel, and means for conducting liquid from said channel outside of said screen.

4. In a floating screen, a sheet metal element constituting a hell with a channel extending therefrom, a substantially cylindrical screen having its upper edge seated in the upper Wall of said bell and spaced from the side wall thereof, a sealed float fixed in said bell within said screen, closure means for said channel, closure means for said bell, the latter means being provided with 'afseat for the lower edge of said screen and with openings for admitting liquid to the interior of said screen, and means for conducting liquid from said channel outside of said screen.

5. In a floating screen, a sheet metal element constituting a bell with a channel extending therefrom, a substantially cylindrical screen having its upper edge seated in the upper wall of said bell and spaced from the side wall thereof, a sealed float fixed in said bell within said screen, closure means for said channel, closure means for said bell, the latter means being provided with a seat for the lower edge of said screen and with openings for admitting liquid to the interior of said screen, means constituting a bypass for'liquid from within said screen to saidchannel, said bypass means consisting of a portion of the upper wall of said bell elevated and spaced above the upper edge of said screen whereby to permit liquid to flow over said screen to said channel, and means for conducting liquid from said channel outside of said screen.

ALFRED ZECH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2448212 *Jul 21, 1944Aug 31, 1948Harry E LernerFloating filter
US2508952 *Mar 18, 1947May 23, 1950Ind Wire Cloth Products CompanFloating screen
US2663425 *Aug 20, 1949Dec 22, 1953Taylor Sales Engineering CorpFloating liquid intake
US2957579 *Sep 30, 1957Oct 25, 1960Megator Pumps & Compressors LtLiquid strainers
US4310423 *Dec 26, 1979Jan 12, 1982Brown Steven FStream water pumping means and method
US6361691 *Dec 16, 1999Mar 26, 2002Delphi Technologies, Inc.Floated fuel strainer assembly for a fuel tank
US6743355Sep 11, 2002Jun 1, 2004Delphi Technologies, Inc.Heated fuel strainer assembly
US6830687Jan 21, 2003Dec 14, 2004Delphi Technologies, Inc.Fuel strainer assembly
US6833070Jan 6, 2003Dec 21, 2004Delphi Technologies, Inc.Fuel strainer assembly
US6936168Dec 13, 2004Aug 30, 2005Delphi Technologies, Inc.Fuel strainer assembly
US6998043Dec 15, 2004Feb 14, 2006Delphi Technologies, Inc.Fuel strainer assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/242.1, 285/282
International ClassificationF04B53/10
Cooperative ClassificationF04B53/1037
European ClassificationF04B53/10F