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Publication numberUS2335274 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 30, 1943
Filing dateOct 17, 1941
Priority dateOct 17, 1941
Publication numberUS 2335274 A, US 2335274A, US-A-2335274, US2335274 A, US2335274A
InventorsHarold D Hampton
Original AssigneeHarold D Hampton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable welding screen
US 2335274 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 30, 1943. H D, HAMPTON 2,335,274

PORTABLE WELDING SCREEN Filed 0G12'. 17, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 F 5 E Tige- /2 ya Harald D Hamptun i' Patented Nov. 30, 1943 Y UNITED STATES PATENT. oFFiCEf nai-01a n. Hampton, United stm; Army. Aberdeen man; Ground, ma.

(Granted under the :et of amended April 3|, 1928;

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes, without the payment to me of any royalty thereon.

This invention relates to a screen for use in conjunction with welding operations.

The purpose of the invention is to provide a light, rugged, collapsible screen for use in the eld by military maintenance organizations to protect the vision of personnel working in the vicinity of places where welding is in progress. Y

The specific nature of the invention as well as other objects and advantages thereof will clearly appear from a description of a preferred embodiment as shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view showing the screen set up in a shielding position,

Fig. 2 is an enlarged view, partly in section, of one of the spikes for erecting the screen on soft ground,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary elevational Hatch 3, 1883, as 370 0. G. 757) wall I I has a plurality of spaced slits or notches Il so as to provide a seriesof ilaps I6.' This allows the bottom ofthe screen to conform to Yuneven ground and makes a more eective light shield. The links I2 are arranged to be disengageable from sockets in certain of the uprights and folded parallel to the staves whereupon the screen components may be rolled up in the fabric wall into a compact bundle for transport purposes. Av pair of straps il and buckles I8 are secured to the fabric at the right hand post and serve to hold the bundle together.

The staves III and II are made of a light durable imaterial and are preferably a light steel tubing flattened at the top ends I9 and provided with holes 29 for attachment of guy ropes (Figs. l, 5, and 7). A spike Il (Fig. 2) is tted in the lower', tubular end of each staff and is secured by a rivet 2|. Each staff -except the one shown on the extreme right of Fig. 1 has a pair of p lugs 22, one brazed or welded near the top and Fig. 8 is a front elevational view of the top y pair of end uprights or staves Il, spaced intermediate staves II, and folding interconnecting links l2which provide a substantially rectangular frame. A treated fabric wall I3 preferably made of canvas is stretched and secured to the frame. The staves are iitted with spikes Il which are adapted to permit easy insertion in soft ground. The lower portion of the fabric the other about six inches from the bottom. Pivotally mounted on each of these lugs is a connecting link l2 having its free end bent at a right angle so as to form a hook 23, see Figs.

5 and 6. Each link l2 is preferably a tubular member and receives a at steel tongue 24 which is welded thereto near one `end and is pivoted to the lug 22 by a pin 25 at the opposite end, see also Fig. 4. 1

The intermediate staves II are provided with tubular sockets 26 which are welded thereto substantially diametrically opposite the lugs 22. These sockets are slightly larger than the diameter of the interconnecting links I2 and are adapted; to receive the hook portions 23 as shown in Figs. 1 and 6.

The staff I0 on the right hand end has similar sockets 2T conditioned to retain interconnecting links in hooked engagement. 'Ihe upper ends of these two sockets have a pair of ears 28 which are arranged to engage the horizontal vend portions 29 of the links I2, see Figs. 1, 8, and 9. These sockets are conveniently formed by slotting their upper ends and flaring them as illustrated in Fig. 9. The ears 28 prevent the right hand staff III from rotating when the links are locked therein in the assembled position and adds to the rigidity of the unit.

'I'he exible wall or cover I3 is folded about the end'staves Il and sewed at 30 so as to envelope them in pockets 3|. The four corners of the cover, as well as a plurality of intermediate points, are provided with brass grommets 32 which are affixed in apertures 33, see Figs. 7 and 11. Holes 3l are drilled adjacent the ends of the' staves l and Il and receive bolts 35 which are also threaded through the grommets in the cover.

A nut 36 locksthis assembly to the posts. A plurality of spaced canvas bands or sleeves 31 are wrapped over the intermediate staves I I as shown in Figs. 1 and 6 and sewed to the fabric wall I3. These act to secure the wall to the framework at several points.

Slidable fabric retaining sleeves 3B surround the top interconnecting links l2 as shown in Fig. 1. Each sleeve is a folded member sewed along the bottom edges 39 and its passage has a restricted portion 40 formed by stitching in a corner Il.

The lfabric wall I3 is preferably coated on one side with an ultraviolet ray protective paint to provide a more eiective light shield.

The operation of the device is as follows. To set up the screen the hooks 23 of the folding links I2 are inserted in the tubular 'sockets 28 on the staff to the immediate right. Likewise 'a pair of links I2 are depressed in the sockets 21 on the right hand staff I0. This completes the assembly of the frame structure and causes it to become rigid. Simultaneously the canvas wall I3 is stretched taut and imparts additional rigidity because of the cross bracing effect of the fabric panels. The staves i0 and Il are depressed so as to force the spikes I4 into the earth. By arranging the staves in other than a. straight line, stability is imparted to the erected screen. Guy ropes are unnecessary except in unusually windy weather. Y.

To collapse the screen the hooks are removed from their respective sockets and folded parallel to their supporting staves. The retaining sleeves 38 on the upper connecting links are slid downward so as to envelope the pair of hooks of v the folded links of each stai as shown in Figs. 5 and 10. The stitched shoulder 4I engages the hook 23 of the lower link and prevents the sleeve from sliding downward out of a confining position. As a result the links are retained parallel to thestaves. The screen is then rolled into a bundleand the straps I1 are employed to secure it in a compact cylindrical roll.

It is evident from the above description of the invention that there is provided a welding screen which is light, sturdy, simple in construction, easy to erect, can be quickly collapsed into a compact bundle for transport, and does not require the use of tools for assembling or dismantling operations.

I claim; Y

1. A portable screen for welding operations comprising, a plurality of spaced vertical uprights having pointed lower ends, spaced `collapsible means interconnecting'said uprights in series relationship, said means providing a sectionalized frame of rigid sections when assembled, adjacent sections being angularly displaceable with relation to each other, a wall of flexible material over said frame and secured to each of said uprights, an ultraviolet absorbing coating on saidnwall, and a iiap at the lower end of said wall.

2; A portable screen adaptedv to be collapsed into a roll comprising when assembled, a series of spaced vertical staves, spaced folding links pivoted to all but one of said staves, hooks on the free ends of said links, socket members on all but one of saidstaves, said members adapted to detachably receive and confine said hooks on said lnksthereby providing a sectionalized frame of rigid sections, and a iiexible wall over said frame and secured to each of said uprights.

3. A portable welding screen adapted' to be collapsed into a roll comprising when assembled, a series of spaced vertical staves, spaced folding links pivoted to all but one of said st aves, hooks on the free ends of said links, socket members on all but one of said staves, said members adapted to detachably receive and confine said hooks on said links thereby' providing a sectionalized frame of rigid sections, a wall of flexible material over said frame and secured to each of said staves, a'loose iiap on the lower end of said wall, and an ultraviolet absorbing coating on said wall and said iiap.

4. A portable welding screen adapted to be collapsed into a roll comprising when assembled, a series of spaced vertical staves having pointed lower ends, spaced folding links pivoted to all but one of said staves, hooks on the free ends of said links, socket members on all but one of said staves, said members adapted to detachably receive and confine said hooks on said links thereby providing a sectionalized frame of rigid sections, a wall of exlble material over said frame and secured to each of said uprights, a flap on the lower end of said wall, an ultraviolet absorbing coating on saidwall and said iiap, and a strap member on one end of said wall for binding said screen when collapsed.

5. A portable welding screen adapted to be collapsed into a roll comprisingwhen assembled, a series of spaced vertical staves, spaced folding links pivoted about a horizontal axis to all but one of said staves, vertically extending hooks on the free ends of said links, vertical socket members on all but one of said staves, said members adapted to detachably receive and confine said hooks on said links thereby providing a sectionalized frame of rigid sections having rotation between sections about a vertical axis, a'. Wall of flexible material over said frame and secured to each of said uprights, a iiap on the lower end of said wall, and an ultraviolet absorbing coating on said Wall and said flap.

6. A portable Welding screen adapted to be collapsed into a roll comprising when assembled, a series of spaced vertical uprights, pairs of spaced elongated hooks pivoted about a horiaontal axis to all but an end upright, the pivots A of said hooks being positioned adjacent the upper and lower ends of -said uprights, spaced vertical socket members on all, but the other end upright,

said members adapted to detachably and pivot- Wall, and an ultraviolet absorbing coating on i said wall and said iiap.

7. A portable welding screen adapted to be collapsed into a roll comprising a series of spaced vertical staves, pairs of spaced folding links pivoted to all but one of said staves, hooks on the freeends of said links, a sleeve slidable on one of each pair of the folding links for confining the free ends of a pair of links when folded for transport, each of said sleeves having a reduced passage for positioning the sleeve about the hook portions of the folded links, socket members on ail-but one of the staves, said members adapted to detachably receive and conne said hooks on' said links thereby providing when assembled a sectionalized frame of rigid sections, a wall of flexible material over said frame and secured to V each of said staves. a. loose iiap on the lower end of said wall, and an ultraviolet coating on said wall and said flap.

8. In a collapsible screen, an upright, folding links pivoted adjacent the ends of said upright,

v when folded parallel to the upright.

HAROLD D. HAMPTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3053218 *Jan 5, 1959Sep 11, 1962Erickson Albert SShip salvaging apparatus
US3125155 *Nov 28, 1961Mar 17, 1964 Portable screen structures
US4685484 *Sep 13, 1985Aug 11, 1987Moneta Ted CWind shelter
US4773437 *Jan 23, 1987Sep 27, 1988Glutting Roy HPortable blind
US5070665 *Jul 25, 1989Dec 10, 1991Adamen Inc.Child's play panel
US5450890 *Oct 1, 1993Sep 19, 1995Rite-Hite CorporationRoll-up strip curtain barrier apparatus
US5542463 *Jul 15, 1994Aug 6, 1996Rite-Hite CorporationRoll-up strip curtain barrier apparatus
US6145528 *Jun 26, 1998Nov 14, 2000Shelter-Pro, LlcPortable blind
DE938281C *Feb 2, 1952Jan 26, 1956Miag Muehlenbau & Ind GmbhSchutzvorrichtung
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/40, 160/127, 135/119, 135/157, 135/143, 160/230, 160/135, 160/377, 135/900
International ClassificationB23K5/22
Cooperative ClassificationB23K5/22, Y10S135/90
European ClassificationB23K5/22