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Publication numberUS2335951 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1943
Filing dateMar 29, 1941
Priority dateMar 29, 1941
Publication numberUS 2335951 A, US 2335951A, US-A-2335951, US2335951 A, US2335951A
InventorsIrving V Mansell
Original AssigneeIrving V Mansell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined illuminating unit and sign
US 2335951 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

/ Dec. 7, 1943.

I. v. MANSELL! COMBINED ILLUMINATING UNIT AND SIGN Filed March 29, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Dec. 7, 1943. v MANSELL 2,335,951

COMBINED ILLUMINATINGHUNI-T AND SIGN Fil'd Marh 29, 1941 Y 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNES Patented Dec. 7, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT,

OFFICE,

COll/IBINED ILLUMINATIN G UNIT AND SIGN 7 Claims.

This invention relates to display signs and illuminating units, particularly of the type in which there is a face plate having character strokes thereon, illuminated from the rear by one or more elongated tubular lamps. The first duty of a sign is to attract attention. In an illuminated sign it must be bright enough to draw attention to the idea desired to be conveyed, and then must excite sufi'icient interest to be studied or observed, but to fulfill its purpose it must attract attention first. Most of the existing illuminated signs are of two types viz., the so-called neon sign, which obtains brightness by the tube lamps themselves being exposed and bent into legible shape for conveying the sign message, or the other type of directly illuminated face plate sign, in which the lamp or lamps are directly in back of the face plate for direct illumination of the character strokes. Both of these types have serious drawbacks which (without enumerating) are overcome in my invention, by my new and novel method of multi-focused indirect illumination of the character strokes, re-

sulting in improved brightness and much improved efficiency.

A particular object is to provide a sign illuminated by one or more elongated tubular lamps (preferably the so-called fluorescent lamps, as these have large uniforms illuminating surfaces furnishing a large amount of light by useof rel- 'atively small amounts of electrical energy, but it can also be used with the high tension illuminating tubes, such as so-called neon or other gas tubes) in which there is a reflector associated with the lamp having a mirrorized surface comprising a large number of reflecting surfaces arranged to reflect a large number of images of the lamp through clear character strokes of the Another object is to provide a sign in which the reflector having the mirrored surface is so shaped and located with reference to the lamp or lamps and also so formed that it will reflect a large volume of relatively intense beams of light to and through the light transmitting character strokes of the face plate so as to create the effect of uniform bright illumination of the character strokes throughout a considerable range of visibility.

Another object is to provide a combined sign and illumination unit in which by far the major portion of the light from the lamp or lamps can be used for regular illumination purposes, without detracting from the brightness or uniformity of the illumination of the sign face plate character strokes. v 1 1 With the foregoing and other objects in. view I have devised the constructions illustratedin the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification, and in which several embodiments of the invention are shown as illustrating various examples of how the invention may be used. It will however be understood that I am not limited to the specific details and arrangements shown but may employ various changes, modifications and other arrangements within the scope of the invention.

In these drawings: I

Fig. 1 is a partial front elevation and partial section of a sign constructed according to this invention, various elements being broken away to more clearly show the construction;

Fig. 2 is a transverse section substantially on line 2-2 of Fig. 1 and on a larger scale;

Fig. 3 is a front elevation of a portion of one form of reflector which may be used;

Fig. 4 is a section substantially on lined- 4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a similar section of a somewhat differ ent form of reflector;

Fig. 6 is a front elevation thereof Fig. '7 is a front elevation of a portion of asign of the type of' Fig. 1 in which instead of the characters being clear strokes on a substantially opaque background the characters are opaque on a clear background; I Fig. 8 is a transverse section showing somewhat diagrammatically a modified arrangement;

Figures 9 to 14 inclusive are similar transverse sections showing somewhat diagrammatically different modifications and arrangements;

Figs. 15and 16 are edge views and a front elevation of a portion respectively of another form of reflector which may be used? and 1 1.

Figs. 17 and 18 are similar views of another form of reflector.

The general constructions and arrangements of Figs. 8 to 14-. inclusive are substantially; the same as that of Figs. 1 and 2, but show theconstruction in less detail and somewhat diagrammatically as the changes or modifications relate primarily to changes in the arrangement of the character strokes, the lamp or lamps for illu minating them, and the reflector associate therewith.

Therefore the description of Figs. 1 and 2 will also apply to the other figures, the individual changes or modifications being more specifically pointed out later in connection with the particu lar figures. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the sign comprises a frame or box which may be of metal, plastic or other suitable material including a substantially inverted U-shape top member I and end members 2 which may be in one piece with the top member I. The open bottom is closed by a separate member 3 of substantially U-shape in cross section and having end flanges 4 at the inner sides of the end members 2 and secured thereto by any suitable means such as the screws or bolts 5. By removing these screws or bolts the member 5 may be removed to give access to the interior of the sign for mounting or removing the various elements or for inserting or removing the lamps. This bottom member 3 preferably has an elongated opening 6 covered with a glass I permitting the passage of light from within the sign for illuminating the space and objects below the sign. The rear wall comprises a sheet of metal or other suitable material 8 secured in the frame, and the bottom edge portion may be bent forwardly and upwardly as shown at 9 to support the lower edge of a reflector it. Secured in the upper part of the device under the top member I by any suitable means, such as the bolts H, may be a metal or other suitable material trough-shape member i2 for carrying the wires l3 and also forming a support for the upper portion [4 of the reflector It.

The front wall of the sign comprises a glass plate l5 which has thereon the display matter.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, and as preferred for most purposes, it may have one or more rows of letters or character strokes l6 comprising clear strokes with an opaque or substantially opaque background I? contrasting with these character strokes. The background is not necessarily opaque, but might be such as to transmit a certain amount of light, although it should contrast with the letters or other design strokes to give easy visibility. If preferred, instead of having the character strokes of a clear glass or stroke, they may be opaque or substantially opaque as shown at [8 Fig. 7 on a clear background I9. The letter or design strokes l6 may be clear glass or they could be cut in an opaque sheet such as sheet metal, but glass or similar transparent material is preferred, or glass or similar transparent sheet over the cut-out letters in the opaque sheet in order to protect the interior of the sign from dirt and moisture. The background ll or th letters I8 can be'provided by cementing suitable substantially opaque paper or other material to the surface of the glass, or it can be painted on the surface. The inner or rear surface of this background is also preferably made reflecting, such for example as a painted glossy white for reflecting light backwardly to the reflector it for further illumination thereof and brighter visibility through the character strokes-so that light hitting the back of the front plate which does not pass through the letter or display strokes is not lost, but is reflected back to the curved reflector Ill so that eventually a large portion of it passes through the display matter, giving it greater brilliancy and visibility and increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the sign.

For illuminating the sign there is provided one or more elongated. tubular lamps 29 extending longitudinally of the sign, and may be located in different locations to secure the eifect desired as is illustrated by the different arrangements in the different figures of the drawings. The tubular lamps preferred are the new fluorescent lamps placed on the market in the last few years, as

they are very efficient and furnish a large amount of illumination with the expenditure of a relatively small amount of electrical energy and may be secured in clear white and various colors, and particularly because the have large illuminating surfaces and furnish a uniform illumination throughout their entire surfaces. However I may use with this sign other elongated tubular lamps, particularly such high tension gas lamps, such as are known as neon, and other rare gas lamps. The elongated tubular lamp 29 is shown as a fluorescent lamp mounted at its opposite ends in suitable supports 2! giving electrical contact with the usual contact pins at the ends of the lamp and to which the electric current is supplied by leads 13 from any suitable source of supply, and the booster or other control means for the lamp, indicated diagrammatically at 22 and 23, may be mounted within the sign casing.

In the arrangement shown in igs. l and 2 this elongated tubular lamp extends longitudinally of the casing at the lower part thereof immediately back of the front plat 55 carrying the display matter, and also preferably somewhat below the line of this display matter. The reflector H] is placed to the rear of this lamp a suitable distance and is curved upwardl and forwardly over the lamp as shown in Fig. 2. It is so curved or shaped that light from the lamp is reflected therefrom in the substantially restricted zone represented by the display matter so as to give maximum illumination and brillianc to this display matter, but the light rays are reflected through the clear or semi-clear character s rokes to the observer in a rather broad zone from which the sign is viewed so that the sign is clearly visible from a large number of different locations and different angles. This means that the reflector I0 is spaced backwardly from the lamp a sufflcient distance to permit of this substantially uniform illumination, and is curved so that no matter at what angle the light from the lamp hits the reflector it will be reflected substantially uniformly over the range of the display matter. I have found that the higher and therefore the greater the vertical width of the display matter, it will generally be required that the reflector be placed a greater distance back from the lamp and the reflector curved accordingly, the curvature of the reflector being generally or substantially a parabolic curve.

The surface of the reflector is a bright metal or lustrous finish or mirrorized surface or any sort of mirrorizing reflector that will efficiently reflect light rays. t is shaped in a general parabolic curved outline to focus the reflected light from the lamp, within a fixed-range. It is formed in many curvatures or planes or both at varying angles, so that the light from the lamp shining thereon is reflected in numerous beams of light or lamp images. Due to this shape and these formations of this mirrorizing reflector and its position in relation to both the tubular lamp and the display matter on the sign face, these large numbers of light beams lamp images shine brightly through the clear or semi-clear character strokes of the displa matter and continue to do so throughout a considerable range of observation. The portions of the reflector visible through the sign face character strokes are substantially uniformly brightly illuminated creating a brilliant display which attracts attention and after attracting attention, maintains interest.

This surface of the reflector whereby the large number of images of the lamp are formed and reflected may be provided in a number of different ways. Thus as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 the reflecting surface of the reflector is embossed with small forwardly curved projections 24, and

in the particular arrangement shown these projections are curved both horizontally and vertically as shown at 25 and 26, giving a sort of curved pyramidal effect. Such a surface provides a large number of reflecting surfaces at different angles, and it gives the effect when viewed from the front of being illuminated by a large number of different overlapping images of the light source, in this case the elongated tubular lamp 2!].

A similar effect of a large number of images or lamps when viewed from different directions is shown in Figs. 5 and 6. Here the surface of the reflector [0a is embossed with low circular raised portions 21 which may be a portion of a spherical surface, and when viewed from the front at the various locations indicated by the points 28 gives the effect of being illuminated by a large number of images of the light source or lamp 2!) because of the large number of reflecting surfaces at different angles.

In Figs. 14, and 16 is indicated still another form of reflecting surface. Here the surface is embossed to give curved surfaces 29 and 30 running horizontally throughout the length of the reflector. This could be described as having curved corrugations. The curvature of each individual resulting ridge or corrugation varies so that, the lower portion 29 is of relatively small curvature while the upper portion 30 is of considerably greater or steeper curvature. This gives the effect of a large number of reflecting surfaces at different angles, and gives the reflector the appearance of being illuminated by a large number of elongated overlapping images of the elongated lamp.

In Figs. 1'7 and 18 the large numb-er of reflecting surfaces are provided by shaping the surface of the reflector so that it has a large number of narrow flat or curved surfaces 3! running the length of the reflector and each arranged at a slight angle to the next adjacent surface. This arrangement when viewed from the front also gives the reflector the appearance of being illuminated by a large number of elongated overlapping images of the elongated lamp.

In all the forms relatively shallow embossing is better and gives a better effect than deep embossing. Also the embossing should not be too large. Figs. 5, 9 and i l illustrate very well why an embossed bright or mirrored reflecting surface gives much better results. It serves to provide a wider angle of range or greater field from which the sign can be viewed and in which it is effective, which is important in signs. It also breaks up the light into very many rays. The number of reflected rays coming off the bright reflector surfaces are sufficient at any point within the range of observation to provide the brilliant and effective sign.

These reflectors as illustrated are shown by way of example, and other forms of embossing or shaping of the surface of the reflector may be employed to give the large number of reflecting surfaces at different angles and thus give the reflector the appearance of being illuminated by a large number of overlapping images of the elongated tubular light source. Any one of these different reflector light surfaces may be used in any one of the examples of arrangements shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 8 to 14 inclusive. No attempt has been made in Figs. 8 to 13 inclusive to show the embossing of the surface of the reflector, the reflector being shown merely diagrammatically as curved to show its general relation to the elongated tubular light source and the display matter on the front face of the sign.

In Fig. 8 the front face of the sign indicated at.32' and corresponding to the plate if is inclined backwardly toward its upper edge to increase its brilliancy and visibility when the sign or display matter is located below the normal level of the line of vision of the observer. This is particularly adapted for such applications as showcases and the like, and may be employed with one or more lamps 20 and 20a with the reflector H) being curved to secure a substantially uniform illumination of the surface which is viewed through the clear strokes of the display matter. The two lamps 20 and 20a may be of the same or different colors as desired, to secure white or different color effects, and the bottom of the sign may be open and covered with the clear, frosted, opal or other light transmitting glass 1 to illuminate articles or space below the sign or showcase.

In Fig. 9 is illustrated an arrangement for improving visibility where the sign is located above the level of the normal line of vision of the observer, in order to secure substantially uniform illumination of the surface of the reflector seen through the clear strokes of the display matter. Here theelongated tubular lamp 20 is located above the level of the display matter 15, and the reflector 33 is curved accordingly, the lower part 34 being a more gradual curve to reflect the images of the lamp more nearly horizontal or a short distance below the horizontal so that the display matter is clearly and uniformly illuminated when approaching from a distance, as indicated at 35, the angle of he line of vision being a smaller angle to the horizontal level of the display matter. It will be seen however that as the observer approaches the sign, say to the position 36, the angle becomes much greater, or the sign is at a sharp angle above the head, and to secure the uniform illumination the upper part of the reflector at 31 is given a much greater curvature so as to reflect images of the lamp downwardly at greater angles as indicated by the line 38, so that the display matter has the appearance from this position of being uniformly illuminated. The two portions 32 and 31 may be incorporated in one continuous reflector as shown or they could be separate reflectors.

The light rays should come off the reflector in such a way that they will focus on the observer through the transparent or semi-transparent, or clear, character strokes of the sign. Unless this is accomplished the dazzling or brilliant appearance of the character strokes is not effective. Therefore the reflector formed as in Fig. 2 would not be sufficiently effective for the conditions of Fig.9.

In Fig. 10 is shown an arrangement for a sign with a larger sign face or larger surface of display matter, or where there may be two lines of display matter 39 and M3 on the face M arranged one above the other. In this case the elongated tubular lamp 29 is located between the lines of display matter, and the reflector 42 is curved to give the effect of substantial illumination for these display matters. If it is designed to be generally observed from substantially the point 43 directly in front of the lower display point 40 the lower portion 44 of the reflector will be shaped and curved accordingly. As the observer however is somewhat below the upper display matter 39, the upper portion 45 of the reflector will be more steeply curved to throw the rays from the images downwardly at somewhat of an angle as indicated by the line d6.

In the arrangement of Fig. 11 there are two lines of clear display matter indicated at 48 and 47 located one above the other but with the elongated tubular lamp 2% at the lower part of the sign and immediately back of the display matter 41. One row of characters may be of a different color from the other if desired, or the upper row 48 could be clear and the lower row 4'! colored. The color eflect can be secured by covering the character strokes with a tinted transparent material of the color desired. The reflector 48 is shaped to illuminate both lines of display matter substantially uniformly, and as in Fig. 10, if it is intended that the sign shall be viewed most often from substantially the level of the lower display matter i'i as indicated by the location 459, the lower part 59 of the reflector would be less steeply curved than the upper part 5! wh ch must reflect the images of the lamp downwardly through the upper display matter iii. In this figure the character strokes ll are also shown as extending partly in front of the lamp so that there would be some direct illumination. It has been found to be possible when the reflector is properly formed to direct and focus the light rays to the portion of the sign face directly above the lamp. With th s properly arranged it is impossible to see a line of demarcation between direct light from the lamp and reflected or mirrored light from the reflector when the observer stands a short distance from the sign, or when a tinting or color (making the character strokes semi-transparent) is put in the character strokes in front of the lamp. It is better not to have the clear letters directly in front of the lamp, but the colored or tinted letters could be. The sign of Fig. could have parts of character strokes in front of the lamp in the same way. Fig. l1 also has the open light transmitting bottom, the same as in Figs. 2 and 8 for the purpose of illuminating the space below the sign, without detracting in any way from the sign effectiveness. The light which passes downwardly through the clear glass l is principally that from the lower side of the lamp which is ordinarily not available for illuminating the sign matter. This is augmented by light which may be reflected downwardly from the reflector H1, Ml and so forth, to the rear of the lap or from the reflecting surface on the back of the background 5'? of the sign face, thus increasing the fiiciency and minimizing the amount of light which is not used or lost.

In Fig. 12 there is shown an arrangement using an additional lamp Zita back of the lamp 2%. Ihis could be used for larger signs or for brighter and more brilliant illumination. The lamps could be of the same or difierent colors to secure different colored effects. With an automatically operating switch the lamps could be alternately lighted to give alternate different colored illumination of the display matter.

In Fig. 13 is shown an arrangement for larger s gns or for a plurality of lines of display matter, or for two different colors of lamps in the same sign, thereby providing two different colors of character strokes through the clear character strokes. In this case a lamp 2d and curved re flector 52 is used for the lower display matter 53 and a separate lamp 2dr], and a separate reflector 54v being used for the upper display matter 55. If the lower lamp 28 is to be used for illumination of the space or articles below the sign through the light transmitting glass 1 then this lamp can be a white or colorless lamp, or if a distinctive color glow of illumination is desired the lamp may be any color that is available.

Clear synthetic resin, such for example as the acrylic and methacrylic resins, may be applied over the character strokes as they are sufficiently clear and transparent so that the reflected images of the lamp are visible through them. These resins can be utilized to secure colored effects as pigments can be put in these materials while liquid or in a solvent and then strained off, giving a tint to the material which is visible when light is transmitted through it, but the stroke is a practically clear stroke and the reflected images of the lamp are readily visible through it. This material and the letters can also be tinted with transparent colors, or as above described the effect of colored letter can be secured by us ng colored lamps.

My invention and discovery, therefore, comprises primarily the new arrangement of the elongated tubular lamp and the specially formed reflector which focuses the reflected light to or through the character strokes to be effective in a range of vision. The reflector is substantially parallel to the elongated tubular lamp and is curved partly around the lamp toward the face plate carrying the character strokes. Although the most brilliant and best efiect is secured with this arrangement when the character strokes are clear, or clear or transparent color, this arrangement has also been found to be very effective with translucent character strokes because it is found this new formed reflector in combination with the elongated tubular lamp gives a much evener intensity of light in the character stroke and illuminates it better and more uniformly throughout the whole stroke than does a plain or uncurved reflector. In mentioning mirrorizing reflector we mean any of the bright lustrous materials or finishes that will mirror images in reflection, such materials as aluminum, silver, nickel, chromium and others of like nature.

Although glass is mentioned for the face plate of the sign as it is the preferred material, however where glass is mentioned it is to be understood as including plates or sheets of other transparent light transmitting materials, such as other plastics or not shatterable glass plates and so forth. In short, any similar material may be used in place of the glass, although for convenience glass is specified as this is the material which is more generally employed on account of its relatively low cost and adaptability. Or faces of metal or other material with cut-out character strokes may be used.

In defining the bottom or the casing as light transmitting in the claims it is to be understood it may be either open or closed with glass or similar material permitting passage of light for illumination. It is preferably closed by glass to keep out dust and moisture.

Having thus set forth the nature of my invention what I claim is:

1. An illuminated sign comprising a casing having a front wall comprising a face plate having light transmitting character strokes, an elongated tubular lamp to the rear of the plate and at the lower part of the casing, a mirrorizin-g reflector to the rear of the plate and lamp and having an embossed surface providing a large number of small reflecting surfaces at varying angles to reflect the light of a large number of small images of the elongated lamp at different angles, said reflector extending substantially parallel to the lamp and curved toward the face plate to reflect light to the character strokes and direct it downwardly toward the bottom of the casing, and a clear glass forming the bottom Wall of the casing so that light from the lower part of the elongated lamp and the interior of the casing may be directed downwardly to illuminate objects under the sign.

2. An illuminated unit of the character described comprising a casing having a front wall comprising a face plate having light transmitting character strokes, an elongated tubular lamp to the rear of the plate at the lower part of the casing, a mirrorizing reflector to the rear of the plate and the lamp having a surface comprising a plurality of reflecting surfaces at different angles to reflect the light of a plurality of images of the lamp, said reflector being substantially parallel to the elongated lamp and inclined upwardly over the lamp toward the face plate to direct light to the zone of the character strokes and also downwardly, and a light transmitting glass forming the bottom wall of the casing so that light fro-m the lower part of the elongated lamp and the interior of the casing may be directed downwardly to illuminate objects under the unit.

3. An illuminated unit of the character described comprising a casing having a front Wall comprising a face plate including a background and character strokes constructed to transmit light from the rear of the face plate and contrasting with said background, an elongated tubular lamp to the rear of the plate, a mirrorizing reflector to the rear of the plate and the lamp having a surface providing a large number of reflecting surfaces at changing angles reflecting the light of a large number of images of the lamp, the rear surface of said background being a light reflecting surface, said reflector extending substantially parallel with the elongated lamp and inclined upwardly toward the face plate to direct light to the rear surface thereof, said reflector and rear surface of the background being arranged to also direct a large portion of the light from the upper portions of the lamp to the bottom of the casing, and a light transmitting glass forming the bottom Wall of the casing so that light from the lamp, the reflector and rear surface of the background within the casing may be directed downwardly to illuminate objects under the unit.

4. In a combination sign and illuminating unit, a face plate having portions constructed to transmit light from the rear of said plate and other portions substantially opaque, an elongated tubular lamp to the rear of said face plate at the lower part of the unit and extending longitudinally thereof, a mirrorizing reflector to the rear of said face plate and lamp, said mirrorizing reflector having surface formations at varying angles to direct beams of light to the light transmitting portions of the face plate and downwardly toward the bottom of the unit, and the bottom of said combination unit being arranged for light transmission from the lamp and the reservoir of light within the unit to the space below the unit for purposes of illumination.

5. A combined illuminating fixture and sign display unit comprising a casing including a face plate having light transmitting character strokes the back surface of which face plate other than the character strokes being a light reflecting surface, the bottom of said casing being light transmitting, one or more elongated tubular lamps located near said bottom and extending longitudinally thereof, a mirrorizing reflector located to the rear of the face plate and lamps having a surface comprising a large number of reflecting surfaces at different angles arranged to reflect beams of light back to the face plate, and said face plate and reflector together arranged to direct a large proportion of the light from the lamp or lamps through the bottom of the unit to illuminate articles thereunder.

6. A combined illuminating fixture and sign unit comprising a casing with a light transmitting section, an elongated tubular lamp or lamps located closely adjacent said section and extending longitudinally thereof to illuminate articles through said section, a face plate having light transmitting character strokes located forwardly of said lamp or lamps, the rear surface of said face plate other than the character strokes being a light reflecting surface, a mirrorizing reflector rearward of the lamp or lamps having a surface comprising a large number of reflecting surfaces at different angles to reflect light to the back of the face plate, and said reflector and face plate being so located and shaped that the reflector in conjunction with the reflecting surface of the face plate direct a large portion of the light from the upper portions of the lamps through the said section to augment the direct light from the lamps for illuminating purposes.

'7. A combination sign and illuminating unit comprising a casing having as a front wall a sign face plate including portions constructed to transmit light from the rear of the plate and other portions contracting therewith and arranged for illuminated display, the bottom of said casing being provisioned for light transmission, one or more elongated tubular lamps located within said casing and near said light transmitting bottom and extending longitudinally thereof, a mirrorizing reflector located to the rear of said lamp or lamps and extending upward and forward toward said face plate, said reflector having mirrorizing formations on the surface thereof to reflect light beams at varying angles to said face plate, said face plate and said reflector in said casing providing a canopy formation directing top light from the lamp or lamps, unused through the sign face, downwardly to augment the direct light from the bottom of the lamp or lamps, for illuminating purposes outside the combined unit.

IRVING V. MANSELL.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTI ON Patent No. 2,555,951. December 7, 19Lp5.

IRVING V. NANSELL It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as followszPage L first column, line 5h, for "lap" read -lamppage 5, second column, line L B, for "contracting" read -c ontrasting-; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office Signed and sealed this LLth day of April, A. D. 19bi Leslie Frazer (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423884 *Jul 31, 1944Jul 15, 1947Walter GlassReflector shield unit for germicidal lamps
US2530133 *Jun 8, 1946Nov 14, 1950Bausch & LombIlluminating device for uniformly and diffusely illuminating a background
US2674688 *Oct 3, 1949Apr 6, 1954Feder Abraham HCombination incandescent and fluorescent wall troffer lighting fixture
US2806939 *Jan 14, 1955Sep 17, 1957De Montebello RogerLight-box
US3211904 *Mar 6, 1964Oct 12, 1965Patent License CorpLighting fixture
US4835661 *May 6, 1988May 30, 1989Weymouth FogelbergEnhanced lighting unit for displayable materials
US5099593 *Nov 2, 1989Mar 31, 1992Lakeside Ltd.Illuminated sign with ice-like characters
US5282330 *Oct 25, 1991Feb 1, 1994Lakeside Ltd.Illuminated sign with ice-like characters
US5355291 *Oct 15, 1992Oct 11, 1994Holophane Lighting, Inc.Internally illuminated sign
US20040090768 *Nov 8, 2002May 13, 2004Kim David K.J.Reflection mechanism for illuminating insignia on a computer system
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/553, 362/812
International ClassificationG09F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09F13/00, Y10S362/812
European ClassificationG09F13/00