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Publication numberUS2336689 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1943
Filing dateJun 17, 1941
Priority dateJun 17, 1941
Publication numberUS 2336689 A, US 2336689A, US-A-2336689, US2336689 A, US2336689A
InventorsKarle John D
Original AssigneeSinger Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical needle
US 2336689 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1943. D, K RLE 2,336,689 SURGICAL IIIEEDLE Filed Ju ne 17, 1941 I I grwq/wbob :fiahn D. Karla Patented Dec. 14, 1943 UNiTED STATES PATENT OFFKQE SURGICAL NEEDLE Application June 17, 1941, Serial No. 398,367

8 Claims.

This invention relates to needles for surgical stitching instruments and it has as a primary object to provide an improved needle which will facilitate the use of the instrument by reducing the force required to be applied thereto to cause the needle to penetrate the tissues, whereby the instrument may be used with considerably less effort than could prior devices.

A further object of the invention is to provide a surgical stitching needle adapted to produce a puncture in the tissues which will more effectively resist the pull of the suture without tearing the tissues than was possible with prior needles.

These and other objects have been attained by the construction described in the following specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of a surgical stitching instrument embodying my improved needle.

Fig. 2 is a left end view of the instrument illustrated in Fig. 1 showing it in the act of suturing a flesh wound.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged side elevation of my improved needle.

Figs. 4, 5, 6 and '7 are cross sectional views of the needle taken on the lines 4-4, 5-5, 6-6 and 'i'l, respectively, of Fig. 3.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged side view of the needle and a portion of its holder, showing the needle at one extreme position in the act of suturing a flesh wound.

Figs. 9 and 10 are side and top views, respectively, on a greatly enlarged scale, of the free or pointed end of the blade portion of my improved needle.

Fig. 11 is a plan view illustrating the needle in the act of suturing a flesh wound.

Referring more specifically to the drawing the invention is illustrated as embodied in a'needle N comprising a shank 3, adapted to be clamped, at 9, in one end of a rod-like support 1" forming one part of a suturing instrument designated generally as S, and a blade v extending from said shank and curved in the direction of its length and provided at its free end with a tissue-piercing point p. The blade is preferably tapered slightly in both width and thickness from the shank to the free end thereof. As shown most clearly in Figs. 5, 6 and 16, the inner concave surface I and outer convex surface 2 of the blade are widthwise flattened while the connecting side walls 3 and 3 are rounded. A suture-eye 1 is formed in the blade at a distance from the point p and extends from the concave upper surface I throughthe blade to the convex lower surface 2. At its under or convex side the blade b is formed with a major suture groove 5 which extends substantially from the shank s to the eye d.

A suture thread t, for use in the needle N, is preferably taken from a suitable spool 6 held within a spool-holder 1, carried by the instrument S. This thread runs from the spool, through a thread-guide 8, formed in the needle-clamping head 9, and thenc tangentially into the groove 5 on the under side of the needle. A minor suturegroove It is formed in the upper or concave surface I of the blade I) at opposite ends of the suture-eye 5. As shown most clearly in Figs. 1 and 10, that side wall 3 of the blade I) which is at that side of the needle to which the support 1 projects, is straight from the shank s to the free end thereof. Adjacent its free end the opposite side wall 3 is beveled laterally from H, adjacent thesuture eye 4, to the free end of the wall 3 In the same region, the under wall 2 is beveled upwardly as at [2 to the free end of the blade, thereby producing the point p. From ll to the point p the upper and lower surfaces of the needle blade are also beveled horizontally as indicated at b and N, Fig. '7, to provide, along the side wall 3 and within the cross sectional outline of the blade, a tissue-cutting edge I3 Which is substantially coextensive with the tapered point of the needle.

In use, the instrument is first threaded as shown in Fig. 1. The point of the needle is then placed upon the flesh or tissue 7 at one side of a wound or incision, w. Rotation of the instrument about its longitudinal axis then causes the point of the needle to pass into and through the tissues and emerge therefrom at the opposite side of the wound, carrying with it the suture thread i. In Fig. 8 the instrument is illustrated in its fully rotated position with the eye of the needle projecting well beyond the point of emergence of the needle and with the thread extending a a chord 76 between the needle-eye and the said point of emergence of the needle. This chord of thread is clearly visible and readily accessible for engage; ment by a suitable instrument by means of which the free end of the suture thread is pulled through the needle puncture to the position indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 8. This free end of the thread is then grasped and the instrument is rotated reversely to withdraw the needle from the tissues. The thread projecting from the flesh at the opposite sides of the wound is then tied, as indicated at c in Fig. 11, thereby drawing the two sides of the wound together, after which the thread is severed or trimmed.

Because of the upwardly inclined bottom surface of the pointed end of the needle, the point p naturally tends to turn upwardly when passing through the tissues thereby facilitating the emergence of the point of the needle.

Inasmuch as the tissue-cutting edge I3 is located within the cross sectional outline of the blade it readily may be formed by simple grinding operations which is a decided advantage from the standpoint of manufacture and economy. In other words, it is devoid of lateral protuberances which to make would require swaging or other machining operations. Another decided advantage gained by the location of the cutting edge at the side of the needle is that when piercing the tissues the needle makes a puncture which extends transversely of the needle blade and therefore lengthwise of the wound which is to be closed. as shown in Fig. 11 this causes the pull of the suture thread to be applied transversely of the needle puncture, as distinguished from pulling lengthwise thereof, so that there is less tendency of the suture thread to tear or cut into the flesh tissues.

Still another advantage gained by having the cutting edge l3 located on the side of the needle is that, after a stitch has been made, the cutting edge of the needle may very readily be brought into contact with the suturing thread to sever the same.

It has been found, in actual use, that due to the shape and proportions of my improved needle including the flat upper and under surfaces, the rounded side walls, the long tapered point, tapered from one side to the other and the tissuecutting edge located at the side of the needle and within the cross sectional outline thereof, suturing of flesh wounds may be accomplished with greater facility and with less effort than with surgical needles and surgical stitching instruments as heretofore constructed.

Furthermore, it has been found that because of the fixed and constant relation between the handle and the needle and because of the shape of the needle-point and the provision of the tissue-cutting edge along the side thereof, the needle may be passed through the tissues without applying thereto stresses which heretofore have tended to break the needle. This, together with the increased strength of the needle due to its tapered construction, has greatly reduced needle breakage. Still further, should a needle be broken between the eye and the shank the two parts thereof readily may be removed from the wound without difficulty because the shank portion is secured in the instrument and the blade portion has the suture thread passed therethrough by means of which that portion may be retrieved.

Having thus set forth the nature of the invention what I claim herein is:

1. A surgical needle comprising a shank adapted to be secured in a suitable holder, a blade extending from said shank and curved in the direc-- tion of its length and having widthwise flattened convex and concave surfaces and rounded side walls connecting said surfaces, the free end of said blade being tapered from bottom to top and from one side to the other to form an upwardly inclined tissue-piercing point, said blade having a suture-eye formed through the free end portion thereof at a distance from said point, and a tissue-cutting edge formed along one side wall of said blade between said eye and said point.

2. A surgical needle comprising a shank, a

blade extending from said shank and curved in the direction of its length to form a concave inner surface and a convex outer surface, said inner surface being widthwise flattened, the free end of said blade being tapered to form a tissuepiercing point, said blade having a suture-eye formed therein at a distance from said point and a suture-groove in its convex outer surface, said groove extending substantially from said shank to said eye, and a tissue-cutting edge formed along one side of said blade between the convex and concave surfaces thereof and extending from adjacent said suture-eye to said point.

3. A surgical needle comprising a shank adapted to be secured in a suitable holder, a blade extending from said shank and curved in the direction of its length, said blade having concave and convex surfaces which are substantially flat in the direction perpendicular to a plane containing the axis of said blade and rounded side walls connecting said surfaces, said blade also having a suture-eye formed therein adjacent to but spaced from one end thereof, one side wall of said shank extending substantially straight to the free end of said blade and the opposite side wall being beveled toward the other side wall from adjacent said eye to the free end of the blade to form a tissue-piercing point, said blade also being beveled from a lower corner thereof at the juncture of one of said side walls and said convex surface to an upper corner at the juncture of the other side side wall and said concave surface to form a tissue-cutting edge substan-- tially coextensive with said tissue-piercing point.

4. A surgical needle comprising a blade curved in the direction of its length and having convex and concave surfaces and side walls connecting said surfaces, one end portion of said blade being tapered to form a tissue-piercing point and having a suture-eye formed therein at a distance from said point, said blade being beveled downwardly from said concave surface and upwardly from said convex surface to form a tissue-cutting edge along one side wall of said blade between said eye and said point.

5. A surgical needle comprising a blade curved in the direction of its length and having convex and concave surfaces and side walls connecting said surfaces, one end of said blade being tapered upwardly and laterally to form a tissue-piercing point in line with one edge of said blade, said blade having a suture-eye formed therein adjacent to but spaced from said point, said blade also being beveled downwardly from said concave surface and upwardly from said convex surface to form a diagonally extending tissue-cutting edge along one side wall of said blade between said eye and said point and within the cross-sectional outline of said blade.

6. A surgical needle comprising a straight shank adapted to be secured in a suitable holder, a blade extending from said shank and curved in the direction of its length, said blade having widthwise flattened convex and concave surfaces, rounded side walls connecting said surfaces and a suture-eye adjacent to but spaced from one end thereof. one side wall of said blade extending substantially straight to the free end of said blade and the opposite side wall being beveled lengthwise toward the straight side wall from adjacent said eye to the free end of said blade, said beveled side wall being sharpened to form a tissue-cutting edge arranged lengthwise of said blade and extending angularly from one side wall to the other.

7. An eye-pointed surgical needle including a curved blade generally rectangular in cross section and having a concave top Wall, a curved bottom wall and two side walls of which one is rounded throughout its'length, a tissue-piercing 5 point at one end of said blade, said top and bottom walls being locally beveled toward each other to form a tissue-cutting edge along the other of said side walls adjacent said point and within the cross sectional outline of the blade.

8. An eye-pointed surgical needle including a 10 cross sectional outline of the blade.

JOHN D. KARLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2841150 *May 6, 1957Jul 1, 1958American Cyanamid CoCutting edge suture needle
US4221085 *Sep 11, 1978Sep 9, 1980Conaghan Bill FCover for stored bulk material
US4527564 *Feb 2, 1981Jul 9, 1985Janome Sewing Machine Co. Ltd.Suturing needle for medical operation
US4798595 *Sep 9, 1986Jan 17, 1989Ingvar AnderssonInjection device
US5318577 *Sep 30, 1991Jun 7, 1994Mitek Surgical Products, Inc.Suture threading device
US5417700 *Mar 25, 1993May 23, 1995Thomas D. EganAutomatic suturing and ligating device
US5437680 *Jan 6, 1993Aug 1, 1995Yoon; InbaeSuturing method, apparatus and system for use in endoscopic procedures
US5571119 *May 10, 1995Nov 5, 1996Children's Medical Center CorporationRetractable suture needle with self-contained driver
US5725555 *Sep 3, 1994Mar 10, 1998Moll; ClemensAtraumatic needle for surgical suturing machines
US7758614Apr 5, 2002Jul 20, 2010Tornier, Inc.Coupling member for knotless sutures and ligatures
US8292920Nov 10, 2005Oct 23, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSickle needle and method
US20140103065 *Mar 11, 2013Apr 17, 2014Coravin, LlcNon-coring reduced shearing needle
WO2006063481A1 *Dec 12, 2005Jun 22, 2006Zuercher Hochschule WinterthurHelical needle
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/223, 606/147, 606/146
International ClassificationA61B17/04, A61B17/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/04, A61B2017/06071
European ClassificationA61B17/04